Is it possible to get into corporate law without.....

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bport hopeful
Posts: 4913
Joined: Wed Dec 08, 2010 4:09 pm

Re: Is it possible to get into corporate law without.....

Postby bport hopeful » Thu Apr 14, 2011 2:58 pm

beachbum wrote:
bport hopeful wrote:Ive looked at the work of a lot of business majors. Its pretty freaking easy. I wouldnt say that its useless, but its nothing to throw in anyone elses face.


Someday a southern business major is going to take your job.

My worst fears realized.

czelede
Posts: 689
Joined: Tue Jun 08, 2010 1:54 pm

Re: Is it possible to get into corporate law without.....

Postby czelede » Fri Apr 15, 2011 6:54 pm

Just wanted to leave this here.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/17/educa ... =education

Business majors spend less time preparing for class than do students in any other broad field, according to the most recent National Survey of Student Engagement: nearly half of seniors majoring in business say they spend fewer than 11 hours a week studying outside class. In their new book “Academically Adrift: Limited Learning on College Campuses,” the sociologists Richard Arum and Josipa Roksa report that business majors had the weakest gains during the first two years of college on a national test of writing and reasoning skills. And when business students take the GMAT, the entry examination for M.B.A. programs, they score lower than students in every other major.


BUT also:
Brand-name programs — the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, the University of Notre Dame Mendoza College of Business, and a few dozen others — are full of students pulling 70-hour weeks, if only to impress the elite finance and consulting firms they aspire to join. But get much below BusinessWeek’s top 50, and you’ll hear pervasive anxiety about student apathy, especially in “soft” fields like management and marketing, which account for the majority of business majors.


I think, on the whole, programs can largely be what you make of it - I've seen poli-sci majors that work their ass off trying to get published, taking on second majors, chairing organizations and really pushing themselves. I've also seen engineering majors that slack off and drink all week. Not every student is created the same and not every program is created the same. The valedictorian of my high school became a finance major at UPenn (she worked like crazy); the salutatorian majored in Econ at Yale.


beachbum wrote:Also,

bport hopeful wrote:Ive looked at the work of a lot of business majors. Its pretty freaking easy. I wouldnt say that its useless, but its nothing to throw in anyone elses face.


Someday a southern business major is going to take your job.


My large state school with a decent B-school program (I think it's top 50 but probably in the latter 10 of the top 10) had a sprinkling of ambitious kids but I can tell you that none of them spent much time out of the bars. I agree with this statement somewhat as it pertains to the business program at my particular school - having studied and worked with a few of them (for consulting case competitions), none of the material is very difficult until you start getting into high level economic analysis (which few business majors do). At the same time, a) this in no way speaks to the intelligence of the business majors, since just because the material isn't challenging in and of itself doesn't mean they should be faulted for the program; b) I have no doubt that there are very challenging finance and econ programs out there.

Also, just for the record, all the managers in my company have engineering degrees beneath their MBAs.




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