DC Litigation Boutiques

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Anonymous User
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Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

DC Litigation Boutiques

Postby Anonymous User » Mon Feb 14, 2011 1:27 am

What have you heard about some of the prominent DC lit boutiques (e.g. Robbins, Russell; Zuckerman Spaeder; Kellogg Huber)?

Specifically, I am curious as to the type of work given to associates, salary, job growth, hiring...honestly anything good or bad you know about them.

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jonas
Posts: 101
Joined: Mon Dec 05, 2005 6:25 pm

Re: DC Litigation Boutiques

Postby jonas » Mon Feb 14, 2011 10:25 am

The good:

1) Lean staffing and lots of responsibility early in your career.
2) Interesting, front-page-news cases.
3) Pay is often higher than big law -- sometimes significantly higher.
4) Better partnership prospects, and sometimes shorter partnership tracks, than in big law.
5) Great exit options (govt, nonprofit, academia, etc.).

The bad:

1) Same hours as big law, or longer.
2) Incredibly hard to get. You'll need top grades from a top school and an elite clerkship. If you haven't already, check the bios of associates at these firms; you'll see lots of 2/9/DC Circuit clerks, SCt clerks, Bristow Fellows, OLC lawyers, etc.

Magnificent
Posts: 144
Joined: Sun Feb 27, 2011 1:27 pm

Re: DC Litigation Boutiques

Postby Magnificent » Sat Jun 30, 2012 9:59 pm

jonas wrote:The good:

1) Lean staffing and lots of responsibility early in your career.
2) Interesting, front-page-news cases.
3) Pay is often higher than big law -- sometimes significantly higher.
4) Better partnership prospects, and sometimes shorter partnership tracks, than in big law.
5) Great exit options (govt, nonprofit, academia, etc.).

The bad:

1) Same hours as big law, or longer.
2) Incredibly hard to get. You'll need top grades from a top school and an elite clerkship. If you haven't already, check the bios of associates at these firms; you'll see lots of 2/9/DC Circuit clerks, SCt clerks, Bristow Fellows, OLC lawyers, etc.


anyone know which DC lit boutiques pay more than biglaw?




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