First Year Associate, Taking Q's

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005618502
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Re: First Year Associate, Taking Q's

Postby 005618502 » Wed Dec 01, 2010 5:59 pm

This has been discussed alot, btu never answered directly. I know you are not really looking to make partner but do you know how much fith year associates make? and how much partners make? Or a general idea

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Re: First Year Associate, Taking Q's

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Dec 01, 2010 8:03 pm

AssumptionRequired wrote:This has been discussed alot, btu never answered directly. I know you are not really looking to make partner but do you know how much fith year associates make? and how much partners make? Or a general idea


My firm is lockstep, so 5th years make $230,000. Bonuses are generally NY market but can be higher or lower depending on your reviews.

Partners make north of $1 million, but besides that I don't know how my firm divies up the money. I don't think it's split evenly.

liltay357
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Re: First Year Associate, Taking Q's

Postby liltay357 » Tue Dec 14, 2010 2:43 pm

May we ask how much you were offered? Dont know if this is taboo, just a hopeful 1L looking to see if those $160,000+ jobs actually still exist. Will help a ton in my decision to matriculate.

Thank you so much.

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jchoggan
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Re: First Year Associate, Taking Q's

Postby jchoggan » Tue Dec 14, 2010 3:19 pm

liltay357 wrote:May we ask how much you were offered? Dont know if this is taboo, just a hopeful 1L looking to see if those $160,000+ jobs actually still exist. Will help a ton in my decision to matriculate.

Thank you so much.

Anonymous User wrote:My firm is lockstep


umm...

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Re: First Year Associate, Taking Q's

Postby Anonymous User » Tue Dec 14, 2010 3:31 pm

I posted anonymously on a similar topic, and I'd like to remain anonymous for now. (If people were to read that thread, I'd be fairly easily identifiable if I posted openly here.)

Question for OP is, are there any first-year associates in their mid-to-late 30s at your firm, or does your firm tend to shy away from older JD grads? And if you do have colleagues that age, from your observation, what would you say are the pros and cons of being a first-year associate at that age? (i.e., will firms assume that you won't stick around, or do they value your life experience and maturity vs. younger first-year associates, etc.)

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Big Shrimpin
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Re: First Year Associate, Taking Q's

Postby Big Shrimpin » Tue Dec 14, 2010 3:34 pm

liltay357 wrote:May we ask how much you were offered? Dont know if this is taboo, just a hopeful 1L looking to see if those $160,000+ jobs actually still exist. Will help a ton in my decision to matriculate.

Thank you so much.



If you're referring to 160K starting jobs, those jobs surely exist. If you're asking about more than 160K starting, yes they do, but often those firms are either Wachtell or elite litigation boutiques like Susman Godfrey (e.g. like most starting associates were at least top of their class/CoA clerk after law school). Overall, starting salary depends on the firm/market. For instance, "market" in like NYC/DC/LA/etc...or other large cities tends to be in the 160K neighborhood. Smaller markets like Philly, etc...will often have more of a "market" to the tune of 130-145K, etc...you see how this goes. Check out http://www.nalpdirectory.com for firm-specific starting salaries (not all listed, but many do).

Since OP said his firm was lockstep, the 1st year associate there most likely makes 160K to start, before bonus.

Lockstep is usually (by year):
160
170
185
210
230, etc...

Also, in case you're wondering, it is extremely difficult to get these jobs. No longer may law students bask in the comfort and promise of a bygone era: the mid-2000s.

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Re: First Year Associate, Taking Q's

Postby Anonymous User » Tue Dec 14, 2010 5:15 pm

OP here.

liltay357 wrote:May we ask how much you were offered? Dont know if this is taboo, just a hopeful 1L looking to see if those $160,000+ jobs actually still exist. Will help a ton in my decision to matriculate.

Thank you so much.


Like others mentioned above, my firm is market lockstep so I'm paid $160,000 as a first year.

Big Shrimpin wrote:Also, in case you're wondering, it is extremely difficult to get these jobs. No longer may law students bask in the comfort and promise of a bygone era: the mid-2000s.


Those days were awesome. After my 2L summer, my 1L and 2L firms were actively trying to woo me for months before I made a decision. If I had gone to law school a year later, that probably would not have happened.

Anonymous User wrote:Question for OP is, are there any first-year associates in their mid-to-late 30s at your firm, or does your firm tend to shy away from older JD grads? And if you do have colleagues that age, from your observation, what would you say are the pros and cons of being a first-year associate at that age? (i.e., will firms assume that you won't stick around, or do they value your life experience and maturity vs. younger first-year associates, etc.)


My firm is completely open to older first year associates. In fact, my office-mate is in his mid to late 30s and has a wife and two kids.

My firm certainly does take advantage of any previous careers or experience you have have had before law school. For me, they try to utilize my knowledge from my (relatively short) post-undergraduate job. For my office-mate, they recruited him for a particular project because of his past career. The experience you have certainly does give you an "in" to certain assignments and people. The firm does not specifically consider whether an older new associate will stick around (mostly because drop-out rates are similar regardless of starting age). Another plus is the ability to relate to partners better because of the narrower (if at all) age gap.

The biggest con is balancing work and family life (assuming a person of that age has a family). I've overheard several near arguments between my office-mate and his wife about when he's coming home and whether he will take responsibility of the kids for random things. Hell, I'm still in my 20s and I sometimes get flack from my gf about staying late to work.

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Re: First Year Associate, Taking Q's

Postby Anonymous User » Tue Dec 14, 2010 5:22 pm

OP, you don't know how much I appreciate that reply (re: the age thing). I really do.

odon59
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Re: First Year Associate, Taking Q's

Postby odon59 » Wed Dec 15, 2010 11:17 am

How did you go about getting your 1L SA? I'm at a T30 with a strong technical background, and trying to figure out my job search strategy for the summer. Thanks.

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Re: First Year Associate, Taking Q's

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Dec 15, 2010 2:39 pm

odon59 wrote:How did you go about getting your 1L SA? I'm at a T30 with a strong technical background, and trying to figure out my job search strategy for the summer. Thanks.


I got the 1L summer associate position through a partner at the firm that I knew. Sorry that's not of any help to you. If you have a network, use it! Otherwise, just go all out with job apps... big firms, boutiques, companies with IP departments. Highlight your technical skills and background and see if you can match with specific practices that the firm has. It helps if you have passed the patent bar or have patent drafting/technical writing experience. Although people here seem to believe in IP SECURE, ITE there is no guarantee even with your background. Have a backup plan as well... judicial internship, public interest, etc.

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Big Shrimpin
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Re: First Year Associate, Taking Q's

Postby Big Shrimpin » Wed Dec 15, 2010 3:33 pm

Anonymous User wrote:It helps if you have passed the patent bar


For 2L SA hiring, I cannot stress enough how extremely helpful this can be. To be sure, like anon above said, there is no guarantee. But Odon, if you don't have the patent bar and you're looking for a way to enhance your chances during 2L OCI, I would strongly suggest getting it out of the way. If not for practicality, then to merely be able to put as the first line on your resume, something like "Admissions: United States Patent and Trademark Registration # xx,xxxx." I took it before LS to get it out of the way. I'd say at least 70-80% of my interviewers mentioned it favorably.

The upside employment potential clearly outweighed, in my experience, the inconvenience of having to study/sit for the exam. Also, it really wasn't THAT hard.

bernard97
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Re: First Year Associate, Taking Q's

Postby bernard97 » Mon Jan 10, 2011 2:38 pm

OP, thanks for answering questions.

You have an engineering background, but I'm curious as to what kind. I have a mechanical background and I'm curious how much of a disadvantage that is to someone with a electrical background. Is there a mix at your firm or primarily a certain background?

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androstan
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Re: First Year Associate, Taking Q's

Postby androstan » Mon Jan 10, 2011 3:54 pm

I'm in at GW part-time but a little gun-shy ITE. I have an undergrad in chem engr and master's in chemistry. Do I really need to place in the top 10 or 15 percent just to have a shot as a FYA?

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Re: First Year Associate, Taking Q's

Postby Anonymous User » Mon Jan 10, 2011 6:46 pm

bernard97 wrote:OP, thanks for answering questions.

You have an engineering background, but I'm curious as to what kind. I have a mechanical background and I'm curious how much of a disadvantage that is to someone with a electrical background. Is there a mix at your firm or primarily a certain background?


I'm an EE, which is in popular demand at firms. Unfortunately mechanical engineers aren't as popular. Our IP group comprises mostly EEs, computer science, biology and biotech, and pharma people. Those areas roughly correspond to the technical mixture of our clients and it's where most of the money is at right now. As a mech eng, you either need to target firms that have more mechanical-aligned practices or sell yourself as someone who is versatile, can pick things up quickly and has expertise/interest in some "hot" mechanical techs out there (e.g. wind farm technology).


androstan wrote:I'm in at GW part-time but a little gun-shy ITE. I have an undergrad in chem engr and master's in chemistry. Do I really need to place in the top 10 or 15 percent just to have a shot as a FYA?


Well, it never hurts to have higher grades. The chem background can be useful, but it depends on how you sell yourself (see above). Don't expect to just show up, wave your scientific degree, and yell "hire me!" Figure out what technologies in your field are hot and try to sell yourself as someone who has the ability and interest to do good work in those technologies. Also, research firms and see if they've done a lot of work in areas that you have expertise/interest in. You can find this information on firm websites (they usually have an attorney by industry search).




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