Biglaw chances at University of Toronto

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A&O
Posts: 347
Joined: Mon Nov 29, 2010 11:08 am

Re: Biglaw chances at University of Toronto

Postby A&O » Thu Dec 09, 2010 2:02 pm

If we're talking just about "being employed," I wouldn't be surprised if most of the T14s had similar employment rates, even in this economy.

If we're talking about average salaries upon graduation, I wouldn't be surprised if 12 of the 14 T14s beat out the Canadian law schools.

If we're talking about overall wealth of graduates within 1 year, 5 years, and 10 years of graduation, I wouldn't be surprised if the Canadian law schools matched American law schools, or even if they exceeded them slightly.

Crim
Posts: 22
Joined: Thu Dec 11, 2008 8:33 pm

Re: Biglaw chances at University of Toronto

Postby Crim » Thu Dec 09, 2010 3:30 pm

A&O wrote:If we're talking just about "being employed," I wouldn't be surprised if most of the T14s had similar employment rates, even in this economy.


There's also a quality of employment consideration. When Canadian grads are employed, the overwhelming majority are in 'career jobs', as opposed contract employment. This is actually a question rather than a comment: how much of the below-medians or bottom-quartiles of T14 grads' employment is contract work with no job security?

A&O wrote: If we're talking about average salaries upon graduation, I wouldn't be surprised if 12 of the 14 T14s beat out the Canadian law schools.


This is likely true, but it's probably not as far apart as one might initially imagine given the disparity in market salaries.

A&O wrote:If we're talking about overall wealth of graduates within 1 year, 5 years, and 10 years of graduation, I wouldn't be surprised if the Canadian law schools matched American law schools, or even if they exceeded them slightly.


I think this is what really sets the Canadian market apart. Even if you get a great BigLaw job coming out of a T14, chances are you're going to move to a much lower paying job, by choice or not, within the next 5 years or so. A much higher proportion of Canadian law grads are going to make partner because the firms are not as highly leveraged (i.e. most are about 1:1). I wonder if there's any reliable data for this comparison.

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Seally
Posts: 62
Joined: Sat Nov 20, 2010 11:50 pm

Re: Biglaw chances at University of Toronto

Postby Seally » Thu Dec 09, 2010 7:48 pm

thexfactor wrote:
crazycanuck wrote:
A&O wrote:
The Canadian system is just the American system, with money distributed differently. With cheaper law schools comes lower starting salaries. That aside, when one factors in loan payments and cost of living, a Canadian law graduate might be better off than a US top law school graduate. But, if one looks at pure salary statistics, I can't fathom that any Canadian school beats out any T14. And I'm willing to throw some non-T14s in the pot too.


I have a friend at UBC law, she knows of 1 person who is an unemployed 3L, and that person is apparently the bottom of the class (as in dead last).

Usually no more than the bottom 10% of the class can't find law jobs (which they shouldn't) and Canadian BigLaw is achievable out of every school, regardless of what is paid in tuition. Lots of people from the University of Manitoba/Saskatchewan who are on Bay Street.

Basically in Canada you go to school where you want to practice and unless you really sucked, you will find a job.



Anyone else care to comment? Is this true?


Yes, since the Canadian Bar is not a bunch of money-hungry freaks who accredidate new Law Schools just for the hell of it.They try to keep the profession as Elite as possible, pretty much like the Medical Association.

Bay St BigLaw is achievable from every Canadian Law School, except that it may require a bit more work if you come from let's say, Moncton Law than if you graduate from McGill/UofT/Oz.

The only exception is Quebec, where Montreal BigLaw recruits even at lower ranked Canadian Law Schools such as University of Montreal, Laval University and Sherbrooke Law.

But even Moncton Law School places very well in Moncton, so i can't really bash them for that.

If you are a U.S. aspiring Law student thinking about coming to Canada to study, be prepared for just as much competition, even more if you want to hit the Top 3.

To date the only "chaoticly" saturated market in Canada is Vancouver, the rest are pretty much stable.

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crazycanuck
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Re: Biglaw chances at University of Toronto

Postby crazycanuck » Thu Dec 09, 2010 10:01 pm

Seally wrote:
thexfactor wrote:
crazycanuck wrote:
A&O wrote:
The Canadian system is just the American system, with money distributed differently. With cheaper law schools comes lower starting salaries. That aside, when one factors in loan payments and cost of living, a Canadian law graduate might be better off than a US top law school graduate. But, if one looks at pure salary statistics, I can't fathom that any Canadian school beats out any T14. And I'm willing to throw some non-T14s in the pot too.


I have a friend at UBC law, she knows of 1 person who is an unemployed 3L, and that person is apparently the bottom of the class (as in dead last).

Usually no more than the bottom 10% of the class can't find law jobs (which they shouldn't) and Canadian BigLaw is achievable out of every school, regardless of what is paid in tuition. Lots of people from the University of Manitoba/Saskatchewan who are on Bay Street.

Basically in Canada you go to school where you want to practice and unless you really sucked, you will find a job.



Anyone else care to comment? Is this true?


Yes, since the Canadian Bar is not a bunch of money-hungry freaks who accredidate new Law Schools just for the hell of it.They try to keep the profession as Elite as possible, pretty much like the Medical Association.

Bay St BigLaw is achievable from every Canadian Law School, except that it may require a bit more work if you come from let's say, Moncton Law than if you graduate from McGill/UofT/Oz.

The only exception is Quebec, where Montreal BigLaw recruits even at lower ranked Canadian Law Schools such as University of Montreal, Laval University and Sherbrooke Law.

But even Moncton Law School places very well in Moncton, so i can't really bash them for that.

If you are a U.S. aspiring Law student thinking about coming to Canada to study, be prepared for just as much competition, even more if you want to hit the Top 3.

To date the only "chaoticly" saturated market in Canada is Vancouver, the rest are pretty much stable.


Employment in Van in general is chaotic.




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