Making Clerkship

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RVP11
Posts: 2774
Joined: Tue Nov 06, 2007 6:32 pm

Re: Making Clerkship

Postby RVP11 » Tue Nov 02, 2010 11:00 pm

vamedic03 wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
G. T. L. Rev. wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:CoAs aren't really good experiences either... The dockets are so light and the judges kinda just do whatever the hell they want since they are article III judges and can't be fired. The reason you do them is because they are really prestigious. But I guess the same isn't necessarily true of state supreme courts.

Say what? Obviously people are going to have differing opinions on varioys types of legal jobs, but to cast COA clerkships as a universally bad experience is pretty ridiculous. I happen to love mine, and I can think of several hundred applicants we turned down who would jump at the chance to come on board next year.


I've heard from practicing attorneys that you get WAY more out of a D. Ct. clerkship in terms of practical experience for the vast majority of litigation practices. CoA clerkships are desirable because of the prestige and because a lot of brainy people have fantasies about being appellate litigators.



Hmm... anonymous poster who's heard rumors versus a nonanonymous current COA clerk.


TBF, it's more like anonymous poster vs. anonymous poster who claims to be current COA clerk.

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vanwinkle
Posts: 9740
Joined: Sun Dec 21, 2008 3:02 am

Re: Making Clerkship

Postby vanwinkle » Wed Nov 03, 2010 12:44 am

Anonymous User wrote:I've heard from practicing attorneys that you get WAY more out of a D. Ct. clerkship in terms of practical experience for the vast majority of litigation practices. CoA clerkships are desirable because of the prestige and because a lot of brainy people have fantasies about being appellate litigators.

I can personally understand trial litigators having this POV; of course they're going to say something like this, since they're trial litigators and thus trial-biased. And there is something practical to working in a district court if you're actually going to be a trial litigator, because unlike in a COA clerkship you get to actually witness trials and learn how they work from the judge's perspective, and to a trial litigator that could be very useful. However, with regard to legal training, everything I've read says COA clerkships are more desirable because they're solely about matters of law and legal application, and push you further intellectually as a result.

And, of course, there is the prestige.

Anonymous User
Posts: 273147
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Re: Making Clerkship

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Nov 03, 2010 2:44 pm

Anonymous User wrote:
G. T. L. Rev. wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:CoAs aren't really good experiences either... The dockets are so light and the judges kinda just do whatever the hell they want since they are article III judges and can't be fired. The reason you do them is because they are really prestigious. But I guess the same isn't necessarily true of state supreme courts.

Say what? Obviously people are going to have differing opinions on varioys types of legal jobs, but to cast COA clerkships as a universally bad experience is pretty ridiculous. I happen to love mine, and I can think of several hundred applicants we turned down who would jump at the chance to come on board next year.


I've heard from practicing attorneys that you get WAY more out of a D. Ct. clerkship in terms of practical experience for the vast majority of litigation practices. CoA clerkships are desirable because of the prestige and because a lot of brainy people have fantasies about being appellate litigators.


A lot of alum that I talked to that did or were in CoA clerkships said basically this as well (i.e. that they loved the job but thought they might have gained more by doing a D. Ct. first).

Anonymous User
Posts: 273147
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Re: Making Clerkship

Postby Anonymous User » Fri Jan 28, 2011 2:58 am

Anonymous User wrote:
G. T. L. Rev. wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:How hard to get a flyover district court clerkship from top 25% at T10? Or how about SD California, Nevada, Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Utah, Oregon?

LR? Published? Faculty going to make calls for you? If yes on all three, then I'd say a pretty good shot but not a lock; if only two, a nonzero, but far from guaranteed chance remains; and if one or none, then the odds are against you. Finish strong, lock up strong faculty support, and apply as an alum (for a year after graduation) if you want to maximize your odds.


No on LR, being published, or faculty going to bat for me. But a judge in one of those districts knows me well and would probably recommend me to others on his district.


This....

???

Lasker
Posts: 42
Joined: Sat Nov 20, 2010 10:17 pm

Re: Making Clerkship

Postby Lasker » Fri Jan 28, 2011 10:28 am

Anonymous User wrote:Does undergrad or work experience matter at all when it comes to clerkships? Focusing more on lack of prestigious undergrad and lack of work experience hurting a top students chances than the opposite being a benefit.


This question is relevant to my interests. Music conservatory undergrad, music teaching WE, no grad school.




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