Recent NYU Law Grad Taking Questions

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Baskin
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Recent NYU Law Grad Taking Questions

Postby Baskin » Tue Sep 28, 2010 6:32 pm

About Me:

Graduated from NYU in May, took the bar at the end of the summer (hopefully done with that exam forever!) and am starting work soon in NYC Biglaw. Going back to the firm where I summered in '09 and am surprisingly happy about it. Finished up above median, but was probably right around median during OCI.

I interviewed in multiple cities, weighed multiple offers and tried to do the best research I could given my limited background knowledge.

I'm glad to provide my two cents on any of your questions, from interviewing with firms, weighing decisions among firms, call-backs, offers, getting your summer-offer, or on NYU in general.

lovelaw27
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Re: Recent NYU Law Grad Taking Questions

Postby lovelaw27 » Tue Sep 28, 2010 7:17 pm

I have talked to several people who worked at a law firm in the summer of 2009 and the same firm in the summer of 2010 and said work was much slower in 2010. But that was in a market that was not NYC. How are you generally feeling about workload right now at law firms in NYC? Do you think things are basically still slow or picking up?

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BruceWayne
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Re: Recent NYU Law Grad Taking Questions

Postby BruceWayne » Tue Sep 28, 2010 7:28 pm

When you were a 1L did you put a lot of work into your classes? Did you focus on the casebook or supplements?

Baskin
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Re: Recent NYU Law Grad Taking Questions

Postby Baskin » Tue Sep 28, 2010 7:56 pm

On whether work is picking up across NYC biglaw:

I think the answer to your question depends in part on the firm, its practice group strengths and priorities (think leveraging issues). I know that work has picked up significantly at my firm since the start of the '09 summer.

More generally, my perception from talking to my associate friends at other firms is that counter-cyclical groups such as bankruptcy remains really busy, but deal work has started to come back in and litigation is much busier. I think work that was particularly impacted by the economic downturn remains slow.

Cautious optimism is the the theme I hear the most. I think it's notable that firms that either did not drastically reduce their summer class sizes for the '10 summer are looking to keep their class size at the same size and firms that did reduce their numbers in '10 are looking to increase their numbers in 2011. Those numbers aren't going back to pre '09 levels, but they will rise - all as firms are being more conservative in general. Lateral hiring has also picked up in hot practice areas (I had several older friends who had been laid off from nyc biglaw and who have recently found work at other nyc biglaw firms). It's still rough out there, but my perception is that the worst is over and some of my friends are incredibly busy. I expect to be busy as well when I start.

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Re: Recent NYU Law Grad Taking Questions

Postby Unemployed » Tue Sep 28, 2010 8:12 pm

Which other markets were you considering? What made you want to stay in NYC?

Thanks!

Baskin
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Re: Recent NYU Law Grad Taking Questions

Postby Baskin » Tue Sep 28, 2010 8:19 pm

On my study habits as a 1L:

I learned a little the hard way. I did put a lot of work into my classes, but I certainly knew people who worked harder. Still, lack of hard work was not an issue. I did my reading, went to class, and relied on the casebook. Before exams first semester I gave into self-doubt and bought a bunch of hornbooks and supplements that I saw my classmates using. This was a mistake. I could build a fort of supplements, but ultimately I should have focused more on what my specific professor was going to test us on; I failed to see the forest through the trees (which is more common than you think as a 1L). I should have taken as many practice exams as I could. I did practice exams, but not enough and those I did do I worked on with little time left before I took the actual exams.

How did I do? Well, I followed the herd in my exam preparation routine and finished in the middle of my class. I had worked hard, but ended up being disappointed. Was it the end of the world? No. I knew I had worked hard, gave it my best, but I was now more focused on making constructive changes. If my effort and smarts weren't preventing me from finishing in the middle, how could I improve?

Lessons learned: You've been successful your whole life at studying. Do what works for you. Don't follow a "system" if it doesn't work for you (i.e. for all those people who used six different hi-lighters when reading cases, good for you, but that didn't really work as a retention tool for me). I found the following to be helpful for me after my first semester/2nd-3rd year of law school:

I found hornbooks to be useful only when I didn't understand a concept and the hornbooks could explain it to me clearly and concisely. For every bit of studying you do, you should be able to say, "this should help me prepare for my specific professor's exam." If it doesn't help you prepare for the exam, you probably shouldn't do it. Use your time efficiently. This is why many law students become skeptical about briefing cases and obsessing over their outlines over time: memorizing facts, looking good in class, and having the world's best 100 page outline won't be too much help at exam time. In future semesters I did more practice exam questions. I also started each class with a good outline from the student bar association website. I made this outline my own as the semester went on, but it was useful as a road-map for where the professor would take us and his interest in the grey areas of the holdings. I also found study groups to be more about commiserating than about being productive. The exception is to compare essay practice essay answers with smart friends of yours or to share attack outlines with friends close to exam time.

I followed these lessons and improved my performance in general for the remainder of law school.

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Re: Recent NYU Law Grad Taking Questions

Postby Anonymous User » Tue Sep 28, 2010 8:23 pm

Baskin wrote:About Me:

Graduated from NYU in May, took the bar at the end of the summer (hopefully done with that exam forever!) and am starting work soon in NYC Biglaw. Going back to the firm where I summered in '09 and am surprisingly happy about it. Finished up above median, but was probably right around median during OCI.

I interviewed in multiple cities, weighed multiple offers and tried to do the best research I could given my limited background knowledge.

I'm glad to provide my two cents on any of your questions, from interviewing with firms, weighing decisions among firms, call-backs, offers, getting your summer-offer, or on NYU in general.

Can you generalize about what the no-offered kids did or didn't do?

Baskin
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Re: Recent NYU Law Grad Taking Questions

Postby Baskin » Tue Sep 28, 2010 8:33 pm

Unemployed wrote:Which other markets were you considering? What made you want to stay in NYC?

Thanks!


I was considering DC, New York and - briefly - Chicago. I have roots in NYC and D.C., but ultimately I liked the NYC firms that gave me offers better than the ones I got from DC and Chicago. I also figured it would be easier to go from the largest legal market in the country to a smaller market, but it is harder to go from a smaller market to a bigger market.

The DC market is in general harder to tap because it's much smaller than NYC (particularly when it comes to their summer classes at the non-D.C. based law firms). I found the firms in D.C. to be much more grade-conscious than I expected. Thus, finishing around the median at NYU after 1L year hurt me more than I thought when I began the process. Friends at GW who were not in the top quarter of their class also had a very hard time (as in they did not receive any offers for their 2L summer). Georgetown and UVA have some location advantage, but D.C. is still tough to crack if you are not in the top quarter of your class. Ultimately the firms that gave me offers from D.C. were not as impressive to me as those who did in New York. I also found that the prospect of doing regulatory work was more boring to me than I originally considered (or, the D.C. lawyers who did that sort of work did not inspire me during my interviews with them).

The quality of life is certainly better in D.C. (more for your money) and my friends who work there work long hours, but seem to have it marginally better than those in their firms' New York offices. I do like the smaller class size and office sizes that D.C. offers (for a variety of work-related reasons) but ultimately I made the decision based more upon the firms that gave me offers than on their location.

Last, I'll add that I loved going to school in NYC and, besides the ridiculously expensive costs that come with living here, l love being a New Yorker.

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Re: Recent NYU Law Grad Taking Questions

Postby Baskin » Tue Sep 28, 2010 8:49 pm

Anonymous User wrote:
Baskin wrote:About Me:

Graduated from NYU in May, took the bar at the end of the summer (hopefully done with that exam forever!) and am starting work soon in NYC Biglaw. Going back to the firm where I summered in '09 and am surprisingly happy about it. Finished up above median, but was probably right around median during OCI.

I interviewed in multiple cities, weighed multiple offers and tried to do the best research I could given my limited background knowledge.

I'm glad to provide my two cents on any of your questions, from interviewing with firms, weighing decisions among firms, call-backs, offers, getting your summer-offer, or on NYU in general.

Can you generalize about what the no-offered kids did or didn't do?


On the no-offered kids: If you are professional, hard-working, meet deadlines, are detailed-oriented and are enthusiastic about the firm (without being an ass) you really should get an offer. It's really not rocket science. The people I know who did not get offers violated one of the above common-sense rules. Attend a decent number of events, but watch your alcohol intake. Don't make lewd comments or engage in that kind of behavior. Don't miss a deadline to attend a social event that your friends are attending. Stay in touch with your supervisor and brief him/her on your progress. Most of the time people will be generous with extensions if you contact them early enough in the process. "Don't be an ass" is a simple, all-encompassing rule. People who didn't get offers tended to violate that rule. know there are plenty of grey issues that arise in the course of following these common-sense rules, but by and large the people who did not get offers clearly violated those common-sense rules.

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Re: Recent NYU Law Grad Taking Questions

Postby Unemployed » Tue Sep 28, 2010 8:50 pm

Baskin wrote:
Unemployed wrote:Which other markets were you considering? What made you want to stay in NYC?

Thanks!


I was considering DC, New York and - briefly - Chicago. I have roots in NYC and D.C., but ultimately I liked the NYC firms that gave me offers better than the ones I got from DC and Chicago. I also figured it would be easier to go from the largest legal market in the country to a smaller market, but it is harder to go from a smaller market to a bigger market.

The DC market is in general harder to tap because it's much smaller than NYC (particularly when it comes to their summer classes at the non-D.C. based law firms). I found the firms in D.C. to be much more grade-conscious than I expected. Thus, finishing around the median at NYU after 1L year hurt me more than I thought when I began the process. Friends at GW who were not in the top quarter of their class also had a very hard time (as in they did not receive any offers for their 2L summer). Georgetown and UVA have some location advantage, but D.C. is still tough to crack if you are not in the top quarter of your class. Ultimately the firms that gave me offers from D.C. were not as impressive to me as those who did in New York. I also found that the prospect of doing regulatory work was more boring to me than I originally considered (or, the D.C. lawyers who did that sort of work did not inspire me during my interviews with them).

The quality of life is certainly better in D.C. (more for your money) and my friends who work there work long hours, but seem to have it marginally better than those in their firms' New York offices. I do like the smaller class size and office sizes that D.C. offers (for a variety of work-related reasons) but ultimately I made the decision based more upon the firms that gave me offers than on their location.

Last, I'll add that I loved going to school in NYC and, besides the ridiculously expensive costs that come with living here, l love being a New Yorker.


Thank you! I am pretty much weighing the same factors as you. Congratulations and good luck with the bar exam result and your brand new career!

Btw, median at CCN usually means striking out in DC these days... :cry:

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Re: Recent NYU Law Grad Taking Questions

Postby facetious » Tue Sep 28, 2010 9:06 pm

Thanks for taking questions.

1) What did you do for your 1L summer? Similarly, how did you go about getting your 1L job (if not through the PILC fair), what factor this played in EIW, and any other incite on 1L summer?

2) What type of extra-curricular were you involved w/ - clubs, journal, etc.

3) Any general tips for the several of us lurking NYU 1Ls?

Thanks again.

Baskin
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Re: Recent NYU Law Grad Taking Questions

Postby Baskin » Tue Sep 28, 2010 9:55 pm

facetious wrote:Thanks for taking questions.

1) What did you do for your 1L summer? Similarly, how did you go about getting your 1L job (if not through the PILC fair), what factor this played in EIW, and any other incite on 1L summer?

2) What type of extra-curricular were you involved w/ - clubs, journal, etc.

3) Any general tips for the several of us lurking NYU 1Ls?

Thanks again.


1. For my 1L summer I got a job at an DOJ-USAO office through the regular channels. For 2L summer interviews this was helpful in that I could talk about legal writing work that I did during the summer. When it comes to 1L summer jobs you can do many things. Rather than the kind of job you got, firms seemed to care much more about whether you did legal writing and that you can articulate a legal topic that arose from your summer work. Within this framework, do something that interests you if you can.

2. From a hiring standpoint, firms like to see that you're involved in SOMETHING at your law school outside of class, with clinics and journals being more significant than clubs. Involvement in one of those two activities enables you to do some legal writing and to show your interest in legal issues. I'd say you should do either a clinic or a journal, but try to do at least one of those. Do the writing competition and try to make law review. If you don't make law review, the differences among journals are minimal when it comes to hiring so do a journal that you'll like (there is a difference at NYU among journals in terms of how much work you'll do. Also, the people on specific journals can make or break your experience). If you do a clinic, work on an area that interests you. I found that people in general were passionate about their clinic experiences and enjoyed them. I was involved in clubs in terms of attending their activities, but not at the leadership level. As an aside, I think the more work experience you have before law school that would interest firms, the less you have to do in terms of non-class activities (from the standpoint of getting of offer).

3. For lurking 1Ls I'd read the exam-related advice I posted a little earlier in the evening. You're also free to message me with any more specific questions that you have throughout the semester. I'd say success is more of a marathon than a sprint. Go to class, do the reading and you can lead a fairly balanced life. Get your sleep, work out regularly or find some routine that works for you. Being healthy psychologically is underestimated, but credited path to doing well. I really think the key to law school is seeing the forest through the trees. I know I'm writing a lot of cliches, but it's true. Keep perspective, stay positive and you'll be just fine. Take things as they come. Control what you can control. Hope that helps a bit.

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facetious
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Re: Recent NYU Law Grad Taking Questions

Postby facetious » Tue Sep 28, 2010 10:42 pm

Baskin wrote:
facetious wrote:Thanks for taking questions.

1) What did you do for your 1L summer? Similarly, how did you go about getting your 1L job (if not through the PILC fair), what factor this played in EIW, and any other incite on 1L summer?

2) What type of extra-curricular were you involved w/ - clubs, journal, etc.

3) Any general tips for the several of us lurking NYU 1Ls?

Thanks again.


1. For my 1L summer I got a job at an DOJ-USAO office through the regular channels. For 2L summer interviews this was helpful in that I could talk about legal writing work that I did during the summer. When it comes to 1L summer jobs you can do many things. Rather than the kind of job you got, firms seemed to care much more about whether you did legal writing and that you can articulate a legal topic that arose from your summer work. Within this framework, do something that interests you if you can.

2. From a hiring standpoint, firms like to see that you're involved in SOMETHING at your law school outside of class, with clinics and journals being more significant than clubs. Involvement in one of those two activities enables you to do some legal writing and to show your interest in legal issues. I'd say you should do either a clinic or a journal, but try to do at least one of those. Do the writing competition and try to make law review. If you don't make law review, the differences among journals are minimal when it comes to hiring so do a journal that you'll like (there is a difference at NYU among journals in terms of how much work you'll do. Also, the people on specific journals can make or break your experience). If you do a clinic, work on an area that interests you. I found that people in general were passionate about their clinic experiences and enjoyed them. I was involved in clubs in terms of attending their activities, but not at the leadership level. As an aside, I think the more work experience you have before law school that would interest firms, the less you have to do in terms of non-class activities (from the standpoint of getting of offer).

3. For lurking 1Ls I'd read the exam-related advice I posted a little earlier in the evening. You're also free to message me with any more specific questions that you have throughout the semester. I'd say success is more of a marathon than a sprint. Go to class, do the reading and you can lead a fairly balanced life. Get your sleep, work out regularly or find some routine that works for you. Being healthy psychologically is underestimated, but credited path to doing well. I really think the key to law school is seeing the forest through the trees. I know I'm writing a lot of cliches, but it's true. Keep perspective, stay positive and you'll be just fine. Take things as they come. Control what you can control. Hope that helps a bit.


Thanks for response. Incredibly useful and (relatively) reassuring. I am sure I will have some more, but I need to finish up my Torts reading :x

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Re: Recent NYU Law Grad Taking Questions

Postby Anonymous User » Tue Sep 28, 2010 11:08 pm

Can you say what firm you're at, or what range in Vault?

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Re: Recent NYU Law Grad Taking Questions

Postby Baskin » Tue Sep 28, 2010 11:33 pm

Anonymous User wrote:Can you say what firm you're at, or what range in Vault?


I would rather not say the firm because I believe I can provide better, more candid advice if I stay anonymous. While I would question how much of a life one would have to attempt figuring out who I am, I'd just as soon be private and reduce that risk.

A word about Vault: In the opinion of my associate friends at a variety of firms, the vault rankings are basically a joke and they don't take them at all seriously. I can tell you that partners I have met barely seem to know what Vault is. It can be useful as the most basic of metrics about how well-known a firm is or to illustrate a broad echelon, but the amount of hand-wringing people make between vault deciles is totally ridiculous (V20 vs. V30 etc). The "prestige" survey is filled out mostly by young people in their 20s who have worked only at one biglaw firm. They are asked to evaluate dozens of other firms on the basis of their "prestige." On what basis are their opinions authoritative? Moreover, once you're dealing with a certain echelon of firms, is "prestige" as perceived by 20-somethings a useful measurement? I'm skeptical. I think Chambers rankings would be far more useful measure and, indeed, I found Chambers Associate and Chambers USA far more useful when I was weighing my offers (particularly because practice areas matter). Also, as an aside, the hiring standards among V100 firms don't correspond too well with their rankings (within a certain echelon that is...obviously Cravath is going to be tougher to land a summer offer than whatever the V95 firm is). My offers and rejections were from all over the vault map.

All that said, I like to be responsive - and sorry for the mini-rant- so I'll say that my firm is in the V10-V50 range and is highly rated in Chambers in a variety of areas. I hope that wasn't overly broad (I honestly couldn't tell you what exact vault rank the firm is without looking it up).

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Re: Recent NYU Law Grad Taking Questions

Postby facetious » Tue Sep 28, 2010 11:43 pm

While this is not directly related to your NYU experience, what type of projects were you assigned as an SA and did your SA gig help you in figuring out a type of practice area (even as broad as corp/transactional v. lit)? Some people have implied that by the end of 1L most people will have a general idea of what they are interested in. I am not sold on this notion, but was it the case for you? Thanks again.

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Re: Recent NYU Law Grad Taking Questions

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Sep 29, 2010 10:19 am

Did you get the sense that your getting an SA offer, and then a permanent offer, was the norm among your classmates? How did your fellow median buddies do at OCI?

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Re: Recent NYU Law Grad Taking Questions

Postby Baskin » Wed Sep 29, 2010 12:05 pm

facetious wrote:While this is not directly related to your NYU experience, what type of projects were you assigned as an SA and did your SA gig help you in figuring out a type of practice area (even as broad as corp/transactional v. lit)? Some people have implied that by the end of 1L most people will have a general idea of what they are interested in. I am not sold on this notion, but was it the case for you? Thanks again.


It may be true that many people have a general idea of what they are interested in at the end of 1L year, but I I think it's good to keep an open mind about corp/transactional v. litigation because in law school people are exposed mostly to litigation-style kinds of activities (legal research and writing, analyzing cases, etc). Unless you've had pre-law school work experience in a particular kind of field that has influenced your interest in corporate work, most law students have little to no understanding of what day-to-day deal work actually entails (and, to be fair, since I haven't even started work yet at my firm, it will take awhile for me to learn what the heck I'm doing). So yeah, at the end of my 1L year I thought I leaned pretty solidly toward litigation. And yet, I was open-minded about corporate work. I had some pre-law school work experience in which I thought I was using a similar skill set to law firm deal-making type work and I liked it. When asked if I had a preference during interviews I said - honestly - that I leaned toward litigation, but was interested in doing some corporate work as an SA because I wanted to make a more informed decision.

Fortunately most summer programs will enable you to do rotations in both corporate and litigation. Alternatively, you can explore both areas at firms that have a more free-market system. During my summer I explored both corp and lit. While it is hard to feel very well-informed after only a summer, this is the business we've chosen (Godfather reference, sorry). Nevertheless, by the end of the summer I did feel that I had a preference for what I wanted to do (corporate, not litigation). I was surprised, but glad I kept an open mind. I do think the kinds of projects I was assigned as an SA impacted my decision.

Here are just a few examples: For lit work I was assigned to research several legal issues concerning damages and turn it into a legal memo for a senior associate. I also got to draft a motion on a pro bono matter and work on sections of a brief on another pro bono matter. I attended depositions and did some written pre-deposition prep work (example: drafted a timeline of key events. For transactional work I helped assist on a deal closing, sat in on negotiations, and drafted part of an opinion letter. Those are just a few of the things that I worked on, but ultimately what influenced me most was seeing the work that associates and partners did and considering whether I would like to do those kinds of things. I was fortunate that I got to have a lot of direct interaction with partners and was able to sit in on key calls, client meetings, negotiations, court proceedings, depositions, etc. I had the freedom to work on what I wanted and I found the work to be interesting. The other SA's at my firm and my friends who were SAs at other places seemed to have a much better idea about what they wanted to do by the end of the summer as well (in terms of corp vs. lit, with some understandable tough decisions about which specific practice group to choose). Of course there are some people who KNEW they loved legal writing and wanted to do litigation, or those with IP backgrounds who came to law school to do IP...those people by and large felt consistently throughout law school; however, for me it was good that I kept an open mind.

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Re: Recent NYU Law Grad Taking Questions

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Sep 29, 2010 12:15 pm

Are you in it for the long-haul (partner track hopeful) or are you already thinking of an exit plan? If exit plan, what is your goal?

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Re: Recent NYU Law Grad Taking Questions

Postby Baskin » Wed Sep 29, 2010 12:36 pm

Anonymous User wrote:Did you get the sense that your getting an SA offer, and then a permanent offer, was the norm among your classmates? How did your fellow median buddies do at OCI?


Yes, as bad as the economy was in the fall of 2008, I did get the sense that my getting an SA offer, and then a permanent offer, was the norm among my classmates at NYU. I do think that the number of people who did not receive permanent offers at the end of the summer was higher than ever before (including last summer's SA class). And yes, there were people who struck out at OCI, more than ever before from NYU (not including people interviewing for last summer's SA class). People were very quiet about it and I wasn't one to gossip or try to figure out who they were. It used to be that around %15 of people would take advantage of 3L OCI. 3L OCI was literally non-existent in fall 2009. My understanding is that most people who struck out or who got no-offered ended up getting SOME kind of summer SA job or did another summer of government/public interest work and applied for fellowships or clerkships after law school. Are there people without jobs? Yes. It's hard for me to gauge the number from my class (the class of 2010) because people don't talk about it, but they are out there. I would bet the number is fairly small, not quite a "significant minority," but not a handful either.

What I think really changed was that people got rejected from firms where they would have had offers in previous years. I had heard stories from CCN friends who summered in 2006 and 2007 of getting 20+ callbacks and of people at median getting offers at places I thought only gave offers to top-of-the-class students at the top law schools. Those days are over and were over for my OCI. Did I get an offer from a V10 firm? Yes, but only one. Did I end up taking it? No, I didn't. At one firm that rejected me, I actually got a call from the man who interviewed me at OCI. He really wanted to give me a callback, and in previous years they would have, but he explained that the firm had raised its GPA minimum for NYU due to the economic conditions and there was nothing he could do about it. It was a nice, but telling gesture.

When I had OCI in the fall of 2008, the credit markets were already in poor shape. We were warned by career services and by employment-related articles on legal websites that summer hiring and/or offers would be down by %20 or more. When Lehman fell, we were told to expect the worst hiring conditions since the early 1990s. Of course, the following fall's OCI would be worse than ours, but these conditions led people to avoid discussing offers, grades and callbacks, perhaps more than usual out of sensitivity for their classmates. My group of friends did not discuss grades in general (we thought it was lame to do so) but obviously I knew who among my friends had made law review and who had not. And I knew in general how my roommate did. I had an idea who was at the very top and very bottom of my class, but I honestly could not tell you where people fell if they were in the %25-%75th percentile range. I am always surprised when I hear or read people say things such as, "My buddy is top %40 at MVP.." or, "My friends who are top 1/3rd at CCN...". Maybe it was just my friends, but we never got that specific with percentages. My friends would say things such as, "Yeah, I did fine on my exams, didn't blow them out of the water, but I did fine." That seems pretty standard for NYU. But yes, among my friends who felt "meadian-ish," at NYU, most got offers from firms within the Vault 75. They may have not received a lot of offers, but they did get offers and I did not hear of anyone median-ish who did mass-mailing. I realize conditions have changed and median at NYU for the class of 2011 had it worse than median at NYU had for the class of 2010, but we were mostly fine. All you need is one offer at a firm you like.

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Re: Recent NYU Law Grad Taking Questions

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Sep 29, 2010 12:44 pm

Are commitment issues normal? My significant other makes fun of me for this, but I'm having trouble with the idea of committing to one place for a job that will (hopefully - assuming I get a perm offer) start two years in the future. What if my interests change? What do I do then? So confused abt this whole process.

Note: Already accepted an offer I'm super happy with, but just having these cold feet I guess. It feels so heavy to make a decision two yrs in advance that could have significant impacts on one's career.

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Re: Recent NYU Law Grad Taking Questions

Postby Baskin » Wed Sep 29, 2010 12:47 pm

Anonymous User wrote:Are you in it for the long-haul (partner track hopeful) or are you already thinking of an exit plan? If exit plan, what is your goal?


Right now I am in the "I hate debt and I want to pay off my loans as soon as possible" track:)

Seriously though, I worked before law school and I entered school being older than many of my classmates (although I won't be 30 for some time). I am at the age and point in my life when I am starting to think about settling down, having a family, etc. I'm a planner by nature (and so are many of the type-a people who go attend law school) so yes, I enjoy hearing and thinking about what kinds of exit options I hope to have down the line. I stay in touch with people and let old mentors know what I'm up to, I take advantage of networking opportunities that come my way, etc. That said, I try to take things one at a time and for the next few years I see myself living in New York and doing the best job I can at my firm. I hope I like it, but I know enough to know that I have no idea what the next few years will be like for me.

I am working on the corp side and yes, moving over into the private sector and doing deal work there would be of interest to me (PE, IB or working for an up-and-coming business and helping it to grow). On the other hand, I am interested in public service, specifically government-related work, the kind I did before law school. There are many ways to give back, but I'd like to have a legal career that combines fulfilling private practice work with government service. For whatever I do, I would like to stay active in some form of public service.

Baskin
Posts: 20
Joined: Fri Sep 10, 2010 4:27 pm

Re: Recent NYU Law Grad Taking Questions

Postby Baskin » Wed Sep 29, 2010 1:01 pm

Anonymous User wrote:Are commitment issues normal? My significant other makes fun of me for this, but I'm having trouble with the idea of committing to one place for a job that will (hopefully - assuming I get a perm offer) start two years in the future. What if my interests change? What do I do then? So confused abt this whole process.

Note: Already accepted an offer I'm super happy with, but just having these cold feet I guess. It feels so heavy to make a decision two yrs in advance that could have significant impacts on one's career.


Congrats on your offer! Yes, I think commitment issues are normal and the grass is always greener....that's true for many things I think. The whole hiring model for law firms is ridiculous and everyone knows it, but it is also a reactionary model so we're stuck with it for now. I have a few married friends from law school and it was definitely difficult for them to pick a place to work when they or their significant other had roots and potential opportunities in other cities. I think our demographic has a difficult time closing any "door" in general, even if it means picking another choice happily. I tell myself it is important to plan, but to leave yourself open to taking risks and to changing course. Unfortunately the law firm hiring model, lack of 3L interviewing options, and student loans makes you choose sooner rather than later. Is a part of me remorseful that I chose NYC over D.C.? Yes, but I tell myself I am, nevertheless, happy to be living in New York, happy with the choice I made and I need to accept it and move forward. I can tell you that it got easier for me after I accepted my offer. It also makes it easier that if good things happen for you in the upcoming months and years (you get married, you find the perfect home, etc). you can tell yourself that these things might not have happened to you if you didn't live where you were living.

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facetious
Posts: 196
Joined: Tue Jun 02, 2009 4:56 pm

Re: Recent NYU Law Grad Taking Questions

Postby facetious » Wed Sep 29, 2010 1:07 pm

Baskin wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:Are you in it for the long-haul (partner track hopeful) or are you already thinking of an exit plan? If exit plan, what is your goal?


Right now I am in the "I hate debt and I want to pay off my loans as soon as possible" track:)

Seriously though, I worked before law school and I entered school being older than many of my classmates (although I won't be 30 for some time). I am at the age and point in my life when I am starting to think about settling down, having a family, etc. I'm a planner by nature (and so are many of the type-a people who go attend law school) so yes, I enjoy hearing and thinking about what kinds of exit options I hope to have down the line. I stay in touch with people and let old mentors know what I'm up to, I take advantage of networking opportunities that come my way, etc. That said, I try to take things one at a time and for the next few years I see myself living in New York and doing the best job I can at my firm. I hope I like it, but I know enough to know that I have no idea what the next few years will be like for me.

I am working on the corp side and yes, moving over into the private sector and doing deal work there would be of interest to me (PE, IB or working for an up-and-coming business and helping it to grow). On the other hand, I am interested in public service, specifically government-related work, the kind I did before law school. There are many ways to give back, but I'd like to have a legal career that combines fulfilling private practice work with government service. For whatever I do, I would like to stay active in some form of public service.


This is interesting, as I find PE and other aspects of asset management/fund governance really interesting stuff. I also, however, would like to probably transition to government or at least be involved in public service after a (hopeful) stint in the private sector. What type of exit opportunities into the public sector are there for corp/transaction practices? Especially in NYC, where so much of the work revolves around the financial sector, what opportunities are out there for going into gov't from a corp background? I sort of worry about this, as I find transactional work and sec reg pretty interesting, but am not sure how this could lead to the gov't w/o litigation experience. I plan on staying in NYC and wouldn't want to go to DC (as if I could even crack that market...), so I am curious what you think the sort of public sector options are for corp attorneys.

Thanks again - you've been very helpful.

Anonymous User
Posts: 273567
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Re: Recent NYU Law Grad Taking Questions

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Sep 29, 2010 2:28 pm

facetious wrote:
Baskin wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:Are you in it for the long-haul (partner track hopeful) or are you already thinking of an exit plan? If exit plan, what is your goal?


Right now I am in the "I hate debt and I want to pay off my loans as soon as possible" track:)

Seriously though, I worked before law school and I entered school being older than many of my classmates (although I won't be 30 for some time). I am at the age and point in my life when I am starting to think about settling down, having a family, etc. I'm a planner by nature (and so are many of the type-a people who go attend law school) so yes, I enjoy hearing and thinking about what kinds of exit options I hope to have down the line. I stay in touch with people and let old mentors know what I'm up to, I take advantage of networking opportunities that come my way, etc. That said, I try to take things one at a time and for the next few years I see myself living in New York and doing the best job I can at my firm. I hope I like it, but I know enough to know that I have no idea what the next few years will be like for me.

I am working on the corp side and yes, moving over into the private sector and doing deal work there would be of interest to me (PE, IB or working for an up-and-coming business and helping it to grow). On the other hand, I am interested in public service, specifically government-related work, the kind I did before law school. There are many ways to give back, but I'd like to have a legal career that combines fulfilling private practice work with government service. For whatever I do, I would like to stay active in some form of public service.


This is interesting, as I find PE and other aspects of asset management/fund governance really interesting stuff. I also, however, would like to probably transition to government or at least be involved in public service after a (hopeful) stint in the private sector. What type of exit opportunities into the public sector are there for corp/transaction practices? Especially in NYC, where so much of the work revolves around the financial sector, what opportunities are out there for going into gov't from a corp background? I sort of worry about this, as I find transactional work and sec reg pretty interesting, but am not sure how this could lead to the gov't w/o litigation experience. I plan on staying in NYC and wouldn't want to go to DC (as if I could even crack that market...), so I am curious what you think the sort of public sector options are for corp attorneys.

Thanks again - you've been very helpful.


+1. I am going into corporate (I think, at any rate), and I want to end up at USAO or in some other gov't position down the line and am worried that a lack of litigation experience will prevent this from happening.




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