Striking out at OCI- a frank discussion

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Anonymous User
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Re: Striking out at OCI- a frank discussion

Postby Anonymous User » Fri Oct 01, 2010 11:08 am

NYAssociate wrote:Wait, do you seriously think an electrical engineer will understand programming code better than an an English major?

Yes. Any EE has wayyyyyyyyy more programming experience than any English major. And its not just a "few programming classes" at the earlier poster, I went to a top 5 engineering school, every single one of us had serious programming requirements (MATLAB, C, C++, Java). CompE's probably have even more.

I was ME for a while, and I had more programming in ME than I did in EE.
Last edited by Anonymous User on Fri Oct 01, 2010 11:10 am, edited 1 time in total.

awesomepossum
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Re: Striking out at OCI- a frank discussion

Postby awesomepossum » Fri Oct 01, 2010 11:08 am

NYAssociate wrote:
awesomepossum wrote:
NYAssociate wrote:
i mean, if you're microsoft's gc, who would you rather have doing depositions on experts, reviewing technical documents etc. - an amherst english major or an mit ee?


Wait, do you seriously think an electrical engineer will understand programming code better than an an English major? The EE might have a head-start because of his facility with math, but they both will have to take lessons. That leads us back to square one.


A few programming classes are generally required for EEs. So....I think they will understand code better.


Fair enough, but now we're getting into specifics. What about bio majors? physics students?



Bio majors have a heck of a time getting in the door at a lot of patent lit groups / boutiques. The reason is supply and demand. There are a fuckload of ex-pre-med bio majors who get law degrees and a lot of the serious bio folks are PhDs. Bio is one of those fields where you don't know a heck of a lot unless you're a PhD. Even in industry, it's relatively easier to get a technical job with an EE undergrad than a bio undergrad.

NYAssociate
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Re: Striking out at OCI- a frank discussion

Postby NYAssociate » Fri Oct 01, 2010 11:12 am

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Last edited by NYAssociate on Tue Oct 05, 2010 9:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Striking out at OCI- a frank discussion

Postby Anonymous User » Fri Oct 01, 2010 11:15 am

I know Irell gives a decent bump up for candidates with technical degrees (especially EECS people). I imagine at least a few other well-known IP firms do the same. So while a technical degree is not required for getting into patent litigation, it can only help.

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Re: Striking out at OCI- a frank discussion

Postby Anonymous User » Fri Oct 01, 2010 11:17 am

NYAssociate wrote:So it seems like the takeaway here is that you don't just need a science background, but you specifically need a degree in a field like EE, CompE, etc.?

This corresponds closely with who top patent groups around the country recruit. I go to a t14 with a decent number of techies hitting up OCI, and the only guys who basically blew up the callback, offer scene were EEs.
Last edited by Anonymous User on Fri Oct 01, 2010 11:18 am, edited 1 time in total.

awesomepossum
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Re: Striking out at OCI- a frank discussion

Postby awesomepossum » Fri Oct 01, 2010 11:17 am

NYAssociate wrote:
awesomepossum wrote:
NYAssociate wrote:
i mean, if you're microsoft's gc, who would you rather have doing depositions on experts, reviewing technical documents etc. - an amherst english major or an mit ee?


Wait, do you seriously think an electrical engineer will understand programming code better than an an English major? The EE might have a head-start because of his facility with math, but they both will have to take lessons. That leads us back to square one.


A few programming classes are generally required for EEs. So....I think they will understand code better.


Fair enough, but now we're getting into specifics. What about bio majors? physics students? My point here is that having a science background doesn't make one an expert in "all things science," and eventually the associate will have to reach outside of his discipline to do a case. In that instance, he will surely be on the same footing as the English major.



I don't think the "outside his discipline" thing is quite right either. Take a basic engineering curriculum. You're generally required to take basic physics, math, CSCI, and chemistry. If you have an advanced degree in engineering or science, you also garner the ability to understand diverse pieces of scientific literature because so much advanced work is fairly interdisciplinary.

It's not to say engineers are better lawyers as a whole. I will freely admit that my writing is probably behind that of my English/Poly-Sci compatriots, but I'm working on it. The point rather is that for people with appropriate technical backgrounds, it's a lot easier to have them do certain pieces of patent work immediately. Things like writing claim charts is a whole heck of a lot easier with a tech background.

You have to remember that time = money for lawyers. If something takes a non-tech person way longer to accomplish a certain task, that costs somebody money. It either costs the client money, or if time has to be written off, it costs the firm money.

I also think that there's some distinction that has to be made between entry level lawyers and people who have been in the biz for a while. Partners may be awesome litigators and have taken up patent lit as an interest. They have a skill-set that's valuable. An entry non-tech person generally won't have that sort of skill-set. Therefore, it makes much more sense for firms to grab tech people over non-tech people for patent lit, all things held equal. Obviously if there's some awesome candidate who's not a tech person, that person is going to get a look. But all things held equal, it's easier for tech people with the appropriate tech background to break into patent lit. I'm 100% sure that's true.

NYAssociate
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Re: Striking out at OCI- a frank discussion

Postby NYAssociate » Fri Oct 01, 2010 11:22 am

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Last edited by NYAssociate on Tue Oct 05, 2010 9:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Striking out at OCI- a frank discussion

Postby Anonymous User » Fri Oct 01, 2010 11:24 am

Top firms have a pecking order for associate recruiting - and EEs with top law grades in top law schools are first-in-line, firms aren't flying around the country looking for "technical advisors" - they can hire plenty of top 5 engineering PhDs for that (those guys will GLADLY scoop up the job given the job market in THAT area).

This thread used to be for a frank discussion for people who struck out at OCI.
Last edited by Anonymous User on Fri Oct 01, 2010 11:26 am, edited 1 time in total.

awesomepossum
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Re: Striking out at OCI- a frank discussion

Postby awesomepossum » Fri Oct 01, 2010 11:25 am

One thing I'd like to mention. There are people who go to work for a certain firm, start taking on patent assignments, and over time work themselves into that group. From what I've heard (totally anecdotal) it can be hard to do because patent groups tend to farm out only their extra work to non-patent people, and competition for that work can be fierce (obviously totally depends on the firm). It is however a route into patent lit if that's what you want to do and you don't have a background that will get you an "in."

awesomepossum
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Re: Striking out at OCI- a frank discussion

Postby awesomepossum » Fri Oct 01, 2010 11:29 am

Anonymous User wrote:
This thread used to be for a frank discussion for people who struck out at OCI.



Agreed. My bad. I butted in because I saw some strange bits of info being floated around in here.




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