JD & MBA for Securities Law

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hoyas2010
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JD & MBA for Securities Law

Postby hoyas2010 » Thu May 20, 2010 10:50 pm

I am wondering about the utility of getting my MBA along with my JD. I studied finance as an undergrad so I am looking to pursue securities law, or possibly M&A/Restructuring. The MBA would be from Anderson, so one of the top B-schools, and they have a number of courses in Venture Capital/Private Equity and other issues surrounding IPOs and financing. Basically, I am wondering how useful this background would be for the particular type of law I mentioned?

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thesealocust
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Joined: Mon Oct 20, 2008 8:50 pm

Re: JD & MBA for Securities Law

Postby thesealocust » Thu May 20, 2010 11:37 pm

Wait, what?
Last edited by thesealocust on Tue Jun 29, 2010 8:27 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Barolo
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Re: JD & MBA for Securities Law

Postby Barolo » Thu May 20, 2010 11:55 pm

thesealocust wrote:MBA schools and law schools love to talk about the value of joint degrees. In the real world there is very little value added. You just don't need an MBA to get your foot in the door doing finance work out of law school, especially with a UG background. All it takes is a good school + good grades. If you don't have those, an MBA will not make up for their absence.


+1

MBA programs tend to have little academic value. Anderson is a good but not great program. MBA snobbery is even worse than TLS JD snobbery. Outside of the very top programs, there's not much point - especially for a lawyer.

Anonymous User
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Re: JD & MBA for Securities Law

Postby Anonymous User » Fri May 21, 2010 12:07 am

Barolo wrote:
thesealocust wrote:MBA schools and law schools love to talk about the value of joint degrees. In the real world there is very little value added. You just don't need an MBA to get your foot in the door doing finance work out of law school, especially with a UG background. All it takes is a good school + good grades. If you don't have those, an MBA will not make up for their absence.


+1

MBA programs tend to have little academic value. Anderson is a good but not great program. MBA snobbery is even worse than TLS JD snobbery. Outside of the very top programs, there's not much point - especially for a lawyer.


This couldn't be more true. My UG housemate is upset that he will probably have to settle for Kellogg/Sloan/Booth because he's working for DC and he says everyone (including himself) considers its a second tier consulting firm so it won't get him into one of the top programs. Admissions to those are ridiculous.

Anonymous only b/c he reads my posts sometimes.

Kochel
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Re: JD & MBA for Securities Law

Postby Kochel » Fri May 21, 2010 8:31 am

If you want to be a lawyer practicing securities law, then the MBA won't help a bit. Your goal should be simply to get into a highly-regarded Biglaw firm with a strong securities practice. Doesn't have to be New York. Taking securities law courses in law school will be somewhat helpful, but most of your education will come on the job. Your experience at the firm may translate into in-house legal opportunities at finance shops, but those places don't hire JDs without experience.

If you want to work at a private equity firm or investment bank on the business side, going to law school is a very expensive, roundabout and risky way of getting there. The investment banks that are left might still hire from the best law schools, but it was always very competitive, and you wouldn't end up practicing law.




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