Juggling (potential) offers

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Anonymous User
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Juggling (potential) offers

Postby Anonymous User » Tue May 18, 2010 1:54 am

For some reason or other, after 4 or so months of desperation, I just recently have had a flood of interviews for summer internships. Right now I have 3 opportunities I am looking at seriously:

1. Externship in [area of law I am interested in] -- this will be focusing on only this one specialized area, and I'd only have to come in about 20 hours/week. (Got offer today.)

2. Quasi-judicial externship -- exposure to a lot of different topics, including another area of law I'm interested in. More hours available but less than full time. (Will get decision on Wed.)

3. Corporate internship -- very cool company, same area of law as in (1). Would be full time, and paid! (Will get decision sometime this week.)

Obviously I really want (3). I got the offer from (1) today, and they want to know my decision tomorrow as I'd have to start next week. If I also get an offer from (2), I'd be willing to do both.

So what do I do? Should I just accept (1)'s offer, and if (3) comes around withdraw?

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WhiskeyGuy
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Re: Juggling (potential) offers

Postby WhiskeyGuy » Tue May 18, 2010 2:46 pm

It is wrong to accept an offer if you intend to withdraw for a "better" offer down the road.

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Bosque
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Re: Juggling (potential) offers

Postby Bosque » Tue May 18, 2010 3:51 pm

All you can really do is call he corporate job and ask for a decision now. Do NOT accept a job unless you ARE going to work there.

Anonymous User
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Re: Juggling (potential) offers

Postby Anonymous User » Tue May 18, 2010 4:24 pm

OP here.

So I just called (1) and let them know that while I was really interested in the position, I couldn't take the offer for the summer. I added, though, that I would love to be considered for something in the Fall. They were very sympathetic and immediately offered to hold a place for me in September. :D

Right after I got off the phone w/ (1) I got an offer email from (2). They are giving me a little more time to consider so hopefully I get a response from (3) soon.

Sent an email to (3) earlier today and am still waiting for a response. If nothing comes in I'll call first thing in the morning.

Thanks for all the advice!

Anonymous User
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Re: Juggling (potential) offers

Postby Anonymous User » Tue May 18, 2010 5:17 pm

WhiskeyGuy wrote:It is wrong to accept an offer if you intend to withdraw for a "better" offer down the road.


I don't understand this reasoning. From the offeror's perspective, he believes you to be the best candidate among many other qualified candidates. If you decide to accept but later refute the offer, the employer will get the 2nd best person, but won't really be affected (probably minute differences from the first and second choice).

However, if you accept the offer but do not later refute it for a better job, I'm sure there will be a notable negative effect if the job you forsook was so much better that you even thought about withdrawing your current acceptance.

Economically, it seems the best thing to do is to accept the best job you can get at first but later withdraw if another job comes up that's even better. the employer you spurned will lose little if you withdraw, but you will lose a lot if you don't.

bradley
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Re: Juggling (potential) offers

Postby bradley » Tue May 18, 2010 5:29 pm

Anonymous User wrote:
WhiskeyGuy wrote:It is wrong to accept an offer if you intend to withdraw for a "better" offer down the road.


I don't understand this reasoning. From the offeror's perspective, he believes you to be the best candidate among many other qualified candidates. If you decide to accept but later refute the offer, the employer will get the 2nd best person, but won't really be affected (probably minute differences from the first and second choice).

However, if you accept the offer but do not later refute it for a better job, I'm sure there will be a notable negative effect if the job you forsook was so much better that you even thought about withdrawing your current acceptance.

Economically, it seems the best thing to do is to accept the best job you can get at first but later withdraw if another job comes up that's even better. the employer you spurned will lose little if you withdraw, but you will lose a lot if you don't.


Wrong. If you accept an offer and later rescind, you've possibly screwed two parties: (1) the employer, who likely notified all the other candidates that they weren't being offered the job, who subsequently accept other offers; then, when you rescind, their second-best option is no longer available, and (2) if the employer waits to deny offers to their second best employee, that person is screwed because he must wait around and may have to accept other offers even though this one is his first choice.

The legal field is surprisingly small, and word like this gets around fast - it's a major hit on your reputation.

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Matthies
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Re: Juggling (potential) offers

Postby Matthies » Tue May 18, 2010 5:32 pm

bradley wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
WhiskeyGuy wrote:It is wrong to accept an offer if you intend to withdraw for a "better" offer down the road.


I don't understand this reasoning. From the offeror's perspective, he believes you to be the best candidate among many other qualified candidates. If you decide to accept but later refute the offer, the employer will get the 2nd best person, but won't really be affected (probably minute differences from the first and second choice).

However, if you accept the offer but do not later refute it for a better job, I'm sure there will be a notable negative effect if the job you forsook was so much better that you even thought about withdrawing your current acceptance.

Economically, it seems the best thing to do is to accept the best job you can get at first but later withdraw if another job comes up that's even better. the employer you spurned will lose little if you withdraw, but you will lose a lot if you don't.


Wrong. If you accept an offer and later rescind, you've possibly screwed two parties: (1) the employer, who likely notified all the other candidates that they weren't being offered the job, who subsequently accept other offers; then, when you rescind, their second-best option is no longer available, and (2) if the employer waits to deny offers to their second best employee, that person is screwed because he must wait around and may have to accept other offers even though this one is his first choice.

The legal field is surprisingly small, and word like this gets around fast - it's a major hit on your reputation.


This is SO CREDITED




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