Are paralegals still in demand after the recession?

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paratactical
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Re: Are paralegals still in demand after the recession?

Postby paratactical » Thu May 06, 2010 5:35 pm

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Last edited by paratactical on Wed Feb 13, 2013 9:10 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Are paralegals still in demand after the recession?

Postby Anonymous User » Thu May 06, 2010 5:41 pm

glasgow3am wrote:
rx3r wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
Unemployed wrote:
:shock:

That is unbelievable! You are not a paralegal for your dad or mum's firm, are you?


No, but the tuition offer was if I continued to work a certain number of hours while I went to school. I turned that down because I'd rather focus on my 1L year, especially since I'm attending a T6. They still offered to give me a portion as long as I "check-in", but I don't know how much yet or how much time this "checking-in" entails.

BUT I was promised partner after school is done as a way to get me to come back. I'd have to see what the buy-in is and what the equity share would be, and I'll see what my other options are after 1L.

I was regretting taking the time off between undergrad and law school, but now my worst-case scenario is partner at a firm with an established client-base and where I already know how to do the work (!?!?!).

If anyone out there is debating taking time off, definitely do it. It can only help and get you some experience/contacts.

I'm jealous!


I was a paralegal at a V5 right out of school in NYC, and made nothing close to 85K even with overtime around the clock. They don't even pay career paralegals that. Unless you're super-para, I have never heard of any firm reimbursing for law school tuition. As special as you think you may be, every paralegal is replaceable and a freshly minted college grad wouldn't make 85K a year. You're basically doing a lot of paperwork. The more practice you get it, the faster and more detailed you get. And the less you fuck up. Fact.

You were promised partner after law school? You know it takes at least 7-8 years in a big firm to become a partner right? You've def never worked at a law "firm"...maybe a two person office in a walk up. Good luck with that partnership.

If you're going to lie, at least stick in some believable details...this is just a shitty post.



It wasn't 85k to start. It was closer to 40k, but they then realized they could give me associate-level work and bill me out at associate rates, so, it became 85k later on.

Under the original deal, they would have treated my years as a paralegal and the years I was in law school as "associate" years and therefore had no problem offering me partner. It looks like they are still willing to do this because they reconfirmed it even if I don't continue to work regularly. They know I might have better options out of law school.

I didn't want to paralegal for a big firm because then I'd be a glorified secretary. I'm at a small boutique firm, yes, but the money is good. Not a two-person outfit, more like eight to ten attorneys, full staff of around 25. It's not my number 1 option, but a good fall-back.

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Re: Are paralegals still in demand after the recession?

Postby glasgow3am » Thu May 06, 2010 5:42 pm

bceagles182 wrote:I'm a paralegal at a V10. I get 40k plus overtime after 40 hours and made just under 80k last year. If you work 70 hours a week, you can easily gross over 80k.


Yeah, and I'll just like to re-highlight the fact that Anon up there says he makes/made 85K BASE as a paralegal...and his "firm" is paying for his tuition.

But, to answer the question this thread posted, I would say yes, if you're a career paralegal and have done it for years you'll probably be in demand even after the recession. Most first and second year attorneys have no idea what they're doing, so experienced paralegals do babysit a bit. And if law firm incoming classes are down across the board for the next few years, you'll need the quality over quantity in every aspect. Good paralegals are really valuable. Law firms will probably want career paralegals who know what they're doing and are efficient. There will probably be less paralegal jobs for college graduates though, or they'll make you stay for at least 2 years (which many firms already do) so they don't have to go through training people again.

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Re: Are paralegals still in demand after the recession?

Postby glasgow3am » Thu May 06, 2010 5:55 pm

Anonymous User wrote:
No, but the tuition offer was if I continued to work a certain number of hours while I went to school. I turned that down because I'd rather focus on my 1L year, especially since I'm attending a T6. They still offered to give me a portion as long as I "check-in", but I don't know how much yet or how much time this "checking-in" entails.

BUT I was promised partner after school is done as a way to get me to come back. I'd have to see what the buy-in is and what the equity share would be, and I'll see what my other options are after 1L.

I was regretting taking the time off between undergrad and law school, but now my worst-case scenario is partner at a firm with an established client-base and where I already know how to do the work (!?!?!).

If anyone out there is debating taking time off, definitely do it. It can only help and get you some experience/contacts.



You're getting a little better about the believable details thing. Try a bit harder though.

They're giving you associate-level work...what exactly are you doing? 1L's who haven't passed the bar yet have to make it clear to every client and in every email/correspondence they send out that they have not been admitted to practice yet. Furthermore, you bill your client when you work on their matter. I sure as hell would be firing any firm pretty quickly if they decided to pass on their work to a paralegal who had never gone through a single day of law school, much less not even pass the bar yet. And if they are lying to their client and letting some lowly para do their work? Hm, either way, sounds like you know nothing about working at a law firm.

Even non-profits have Yale and Harvard grads lining up these days to work....must be pretty slim pickings if they are willing to offer partnership to someone whose barely made it through the first year of law school...and have what maybe 15 law school credits to their name. Did the attorneys at this firm even go to accredited law schools?

This is getting kind of funny.

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Re: Are paralegals still in demand after the recession?

Postby Anonymous User » Thu May 06, 2010 6:05 pm

glasgow3am wrote:
You're getting a little better about the believable details thing. Try a bit harder though.

They're giving you associate-level work...what exactly are you doing? 1L's who haven't passed the bar yet have to make it clear to every client and in every email/correspondence they send out that they have not been admitted to practice yet. Furthermore, you bill your client when you work on their matter. I sure as hell would be firing any firm pretty quickly if they decided to pass on their work to a paralegal who had never gone through a single day of law school, much less not even pass the bar yet. And if they're not telling their client their letting some lowly para do their work? Hm, either way, sounds like you know nothing about working at a law firm.

Even non-profits have Yale and Harvard grads lining up these days to work....must be pretty slim pickings if they are willing to offer partnership to someone whose barely made it through the first year of law school...and have what maybe 15 law school credits to their name. Did the attorneys at this firm even go to accredited law schools?

This is getting kind of funny.


They do let the clients know that I'm working on their matters and the words "Legal Assistant" follow absolutely every letter or email that I write. I sit in on every client meeting and introduce myself as a paralegal. Every client knows what my title is and that I will be working on their matters. The work here is very specialized and by "associate-level work" I mean basic legal research and drafting of contracts and agreements that they would usually give to first-year associates. I, of course, have to run everything by a partner before it goes to a client. Attorneys here are all NYU Law grads FWIW.

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Re: Are paralegals still in demand after the recession?

Postby Anonymous User » Thu May 06, 2010 6:14 pm

glasgow3am wrote:You're getting a little better about the believable details thing. Try a bit harder though.

They're giving you associate-level work...what exactly are you doing? 1L's who haven't passed the bar yet have to make it clear to every client and in every email/correspondence they send out that they have not been admitted to practice yet. Furthermore, you bill your client when you work on their matter. I sure as hell would be firing any firm pretty quickly if they decided to pass on their work to a paralegal who had never gone through a single day of law school, much less not even pass the bar yet. And if they are lying to their client and letting some lowly para do their work? Hm, either way, sounds like you know nothing about working at a law firm.

Even non-profits have Yale and Harvard grads lining up these days to work....must be pretty slim pickings if they are willing to offer partnership to someone whose barely made it through the first year of law school...and have what maybe 15 law school credits to their name. Did the attorneys at this firm even go to accredited law schools?

This is getting kind of funny.


I am going to address a couple points here:

1 - this is not unheard of. Senior level paralegals do a lot of the same type of work that many junior level associates would do if firms had hired junior associates. I am a senior paralegal, and now that the economy is bad, I am doing a lot more substantive work. Ultimately senior level attorneys review my work and send it out, but the fact still remains that I am doing the work, the clients are paying me to do the work, and the work is being circulated after attorney review. Nothing really different than before, except that the client pays less for the work to get done.

2 - As for the "I sure as hell" part, maybe that's why you aren't in business. Considering attorney hourly rates can be several hundred an hour, companies don't mind paying paralegals if they are legitimately getting work done, because it is a lot cheaper. Sure, they may only be saving about $10 an hour with me, but I know for a fact that I get things done in many less hours than a 1L would.

3 - at many law firms paralegals are required to set themselves out as paralegal in email correspondence. This can be accomplished in the same way that first year associates claim they are not admitted to the bar and thus can not give legal advice -- merely by putting a footer in your emails indicating you are a paralegal.

4 - yes, paralegals can make $85k base, depending on the firm

PS - I am a different paralegal than OP

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Re: Are paralegals still in demand after the recession?

Postby glasgow3am » Thu May 06, 2010 6:35 pm

Anonymous User wrote:I am going to address a couple points here:

1 - this is not unheard of. Senior level paralegals do a lot of the same type of work that many junior level associates would do if firms had hired junior associates. I am a senior paralegal, and now that the economy is bad, I am doing a lot more substantive work. Ultimately senior level attorneys review my work and send it out, but the fact still remains that I am doing the work, the clients are paying me to do the work, and the work is being circulated after attorney review. Nothing really different than before, except that the client pays less for the work to get done.

2 - As for the "I sure as hell" part, maybe that's why you aren't in business. Considering attorney hourly rates can be several hundred an hour, companies don't mind paying paralegals if they are legitimately getting work done, because it is a lot cheaper. Sure, they may only be saving about $10 an hour with me, but I know for a fact that I get things done in many less hours than a 1L would.

3 - at many law firms paralegals are required to set themselves out as paralegal in email correspondence. This can be accomplished in the same way that first year associates claim they are not admitted to the bar and thus can not give legal advice -- merely by putting a footer in your emails indicating you are a paralegal.

4 - yes, paralegals can make $85k base, depending on the firm

PS - I am a different paralegal than OP


Maybe I am just in a bitchy mood because I'm in the midst of exams. I dunno. But I think you should have been clearer in your initial answers. You made it sound like you were a recent college grad who slipped in a year or two as a paralegal (with a 85K base salary no less) before heading off to law school with tuition re-imbursement and a partnership waiting. I mean, doesn't sound like most paralegal experiences I've heard of or seen.

Of course, paralegals can make good BASE money. Those are career or experienced paralegals. And even ones who aren't can make good money with overtime. My point was you made it sound as though you just graduated and landed a 85K base job.

My paralegal manager did substantive work too - however, they were not paid an associate's salary. My firm capped senior and paralegal managers salaries (because they could do OT) after a certain point so that they could never earn as much as a first year even with OT. Don't know exact numbers, but that's what I was told.

Companies don't mind paying for paralegals, of course not! ANYONE who works on a matter bills the client. But if I am paying for legal counsel and I am hiring an attorney, I want that work to be completed by an attorney, not some one who can pass off as one. There are some things only an attorney can do. That's why you have to pass the bar first, and that's why fortune 500 companies will pay millions to get representation. They need legal counsel. And that means people who have the credentials. Not someone who can pass off as one.

What you described "basic legal research and drafting of contracts and agreements" are not things that a company would exclusively need an attorney to do. I think its almost expected for paralegals to do what you described.

But you said you were doing associate level work - which I took to mean you were doing real substantive work. Saying you were given work that a first year was given is not substantive btw. Paralegals with at least two years under their belt do more than first year associates. First years have no idea what they're doing. I would say second years don't really either.
Last edited by glasgow3am on Thu May 06, 2010 6:54 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Are paralegals still in demand after the recession?

Postby Anonymous User » Thu May 06, 2010 6:42 pm

I agree that there are a couple people posting as Anon in here and it is really confusing me too.



EDIT: I am outing myself because I don't know why I hit the Anonymous Reply.

TLS Bert

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Re: Are paralegals still in demand after the recession?

Postby Anonymous User » Thu May 06, 2010 6:50 pm

glasgow3am wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:I am going to address a couple points here:

1 - this is not unheard of. Senior level paralegals do a lot of the same type of work that many junior level associates would do if firms had hired junior associates. I am a senior paralegal, and now that the economy is bad, I am doing a lot more substantive work. Ultimately senior level attorneys review my work and send it out, but the fact still remains that I am doing the work, the clients are paying me to do the work, and the work is being circulated after attorney review. Nothing really different than before, except that the client pays less for the work to get done.

2 - As for the "I sure as hell" part, maybe that's why you aren't in business. Considering attorney hourly rates can be several hundred an hour, companies don't mind paying paralegals if they are legitimately getting work done, because it is a lot cheaper. Sure, they may only be saving about $10 an hour with me, but I know for a fact that I get things done in many less hours than a 1L would.

3 - at many law firms paralegals are required to set themselves out as paralegal in email correspondence. This can be accomplished in the same way that first year associates claim they are not admitted to the bar and thus can not give legal advice -- merely by putting a footer in your emails indicating you are a paralegal.

4 - yes, paralegals can make $85k base, depending on the firm

PS - I am a different paralegal than OP


Maybe I am just in a bitchy mood because I'm in the midst of exams. I dunno. But I think you should have been clearer in your initial answers. You made it sound like you were a recent college grad who slipped in a year or two as a paralegal (with a 85K base salary no less) before heading off to law school with tuition re-imbursement and a partnership waiting. I mean, doesn't sound like most paralegal experiences I've heard of or seen.

Of course, paralegals can make good BASE money. Those are career or experienced paralegals. And even ones who aren't can make good money with overtime. My point was you made it sound as though you just graduated and landed a 85K base job.

My paralegal manager did substantive work too - however, they were not paid an associate's salary. My firm capped senior and paralegal managers salaries (because they could do OT) after a certain point so that they could never earn as much as a first year even with OT. Don't know exact numbers, but that's what I was told.

Companies don't mind paying for paralegals, of course not! ANYONE who works on a matter bills the client. But if I am paying for legal counsel and I am hiring an attorney, I want that work to be completed by an attorney, not some one who can pass off as one. There are some things only an attorney can do. That's why you have to pass the bar first, and that's why fortune 500 companies will pay millions to get representation. They need legal counsel. And that means people who have the credentials. Not someone who can pass off as one.

What you described "basic legal research and drafting of contracts and agreements" are not things that a company would exclusively need an attorney to do. I think its almost expected for paralegals to do what you described.

But you said you were doing associate level work - which I took to mean you were doing real substantive work. Saying you were given work that a first year was given is not substantive btw. Paralegals with at least two years under their belt do more than first years. First years have no idea what they're doing. I would say second years don't really either.


There's some confusion here because the user above is a different anonymous user than me, but either way, the situation is very similar.

Sorry if I was unclear before, but FWIW, I was a paralegal at the firm for 3 1/2 years before I decided to go to law school and this offer of tuition/partner was made. Also, I make 85k base and put in NO overtime, and they don't expect me/ask me to put in overtime so I do not make as much as a typical first year associate.

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Re: Are paralegals still in demand after the recession?

Postby paratactical » Thu May 06, 2010 6:52 pm

.
Last edited by paratactical on Wed Feb 13, 2013 9:09 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Are paralegals still in demand after the recession?

Postby Anonymous User » Thu May 06, 2010 7:00 pm

paratactical wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
There's some confusion here because the user above is a different anonymous user than me, but either way, the situation is very similar.

Sorry if I was unclear before, but FWIW, I was a paralegal at the firm for 3 1/2 years before I decided to go to law school and this offer of tuition/partner was made. Also, I make 85k base and put in NO overtime, and they don't expect me/ask me to put in overtime so I do not make as much as a typical first year associate.


Who is at what kind of firm? I saw one Anon mention a boutique.



Call me Sam.

Sam works at a boutique firm, makes 85k base after working 3 1/2 years, does not do OT, got offered tuition payment plus full salary if working 30 hours per week during school and partner upon passing the bar.

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Re: Are paralegals still in demand after the recession?

Postby glasgow3am » Thu May 06, 2010 7:11 pm

Anonymous User wrote:
glasgow3am wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:I am going to address a couple points here:

1 - this is not unheard of. Senior level paralegals do a lot of the same type of work that many junior level associates would do if firms had hired junior associates. I am a senior paralegal, and now that the economy is bad, I am doing a lot more substantive work. Ultimately senior level attorneys review my work and send it out, but the fact still remains that I am doing the work, the clients are paying me to do the work, and the work is being circulated after attorney review. Nothing really different than before, except that the client pays less for the work to get done.

2 - As for the "I sure as hell" part, maybe that's why you aren't in business. Considering attorney hourly rates can be several hundred an hour, companies don't mind paying paralegals if they are legitimately getting work done, because it is a lot cheaper. Sure, they may only be saving about $10 an hour with me, but I know for a fact that I get things done in many less hours than a 1L would.

3 - at many law firms paralegals are required to set themselves out as paralegal in email correspondence. This can be accomplished in the same way that first year associates claim they are not admitted to the bar and thus can not give legal advice -- merely by putting a footer in your emails indicating you are a paralegal.

4 - yes, paralegals can make $85k base, depending on the firm

PS - I am a different paralegal than OP


Maybe I am just in a bitchy mood because I'm in the midst of exams. I dunno. But I think you should have been clearer in your initial answers. You made it sound like you were a recent college grad who slipped in a year or two as a paralegal (with a 85K base salary no less) before heading off to law school with tuition re-imbursement and a partnership waiting. I mean, doesn't sound like most paralegal experiences I've heard of or seen.

Of course, paralegals can make good BASE money. Those are career or experienced paralegals. And even ones who aren't can make good money with overtime. My point was you made it sound as though you just graduated and landed a 85K base job.

My paralegal manager did substantive work too - however, they were not paid an associate's salary. My firm capped senior and paralegal managers salaries (because they could do OT) after a certain point so that they could never earn as much as a first year even with OT. Don't know exact numbers, but that's what I was told.

Companies don't mind paying for paralegals, of course not! ANYONE who works on a matter bills the client. But if I am paying for legal counsel and I am hiring an attorney, I want that work to be completed by an attorney, not some one who can pass off as one. There are some things only an attorney can do. That's why you have to pass the bar first, and that's why fortune 500 companies will pay millions to get representation. They need legal counsel. And that means people who have the credentials. Not someone who can pass off as one.

What you described "basic legal research and drafting of contracts and agreements" are not things that a company would exclusively need an attorney to do. I think its almost expected for paralegals to do what you described.

But you said you were doing associate level work - which I took to mean you were doing real substantive work. Saying you were given work that a first year was given is not substantive btw. Paralegals with at least two years under their belt do more than first years. First years have no idea what they're doing. I would say second years don't really either.


There's some confusion here because the user above is a different anonymous user than me, but either way, the situation is very similar.

Sorry if I was unclear before, but FWIW, I was a paralegal at the firm for 3 1/2 years before I decided to go to law school and this offer of tuition/partner was made. Also, I make 85k base and put in NO overtime, and they don't expect me/ask me to put in overtime so I do not make as much as a typical first year associate.


I thought I was talking to you when I was responding to 4-point Anon above, who I guess has now outed himself as Bert. For the record, he actually sounds legit.

And anyways, in a 8-10 attorney office, how many partners can there be? But either way, being offered a partnership even before you've finished your first year (regardless of how long you've worked in whatever capacity you claim) seems waaaaayy of base.

I think there should be more emphasis placed on the fact that very few (and by that I mean 0) paralegals get 85k BASE off the bat right out of college, and those that get that salary are senior or paralegal managers who have worked for YEARS. That salary obviously reflects that. My manager did VERY well for himself, but he had worked there for 9 years.

I would also love to know exactly what "firm" you're at.

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Re: Are paralegals still in demand after the recession?

Postby glasgow3am » Thu May 06, 2010 7:17 pm

Anonymous User wrote:
paratactical wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
There's some confusion here because the user above is a different anonymous user than me, but either way, the situation is very similar.

Sorry if I was unclear before, but FWIW, I was a paralegal at the firm for 3 1/2 years before I decided to go to law school and this offer of tuition/partner was made. Also, I make 85k base and put in NO overtime, and they don't expect me/ask me to put in overtime so I do not make as much as a typical first year associate.


Who is at what kind of firm? I saw one Anon mention a boutique.



Call me Sam.

Sam works at a boutique firm, makes 85k base after working 3 1/2 years, does not do OT, got offered tuition payment plus full salary if working 30 hours per week during school and partner upon passing the bar.


Sam, I call bullshit. This has been amusing (and a good break from studying for torts), but unless you reveal the "firm" you're working at, I'm assuming you work as a janitor as this firm and you spend most of the day dreaming.

EDITED to add I just realized you said you've allegedly worked at this firm for 3 1/2 years....which only came out after a bunch of posts. I'll give you a pass on the 85K salary after working there for 3 1/2 years (although I'm still skeptical), but an offer of partnership after passing the bar? Calling BS on that one (and tuition payment).
Last edited by glasgow3am on Thu May 06, 2010 7:27 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Are paralegals still in demand after the recession?

Postby Duralex » Thu May 06, 2010 7:22 pm

I am a paralegal working for a family firm.

The only way this makes sense is if it's a "partner in name only" arrangement--your name moves up on the letterhead, but you get no vote and no equity (and thus no profit share.) Which is a pleasant carrot, but doesn't mean much in the end (except maybe for better leverage in a lateral move.) On the tuition--didn't he say Tier 6? What the hell is Tier 6? Bangalore Academy of Online Jurisprudence? I know he didn't mean Top 6. Right?

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Re: Are paralegals still in demand after the recession?

Postby Anonymous User » Thu May 06, 2010 7:27 pm

glasgow3am wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
glasgow3am wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:I am going to address a couple points here:

1 - this is not unheard of. Senior level paralegals do a lot of the same type of work that many junior level associates would do if firms had hired junior associates. I am a senior paralegal, and now that the economy is bad, I am doing a lot more substantive work. Ultimately senior level attorneys review my work and send it out, but the fact still remains that I am doing the work, the clients are paying me to do the work, and the work is being circulated after attorney review. Nothing really different than before, except that the client pays less for the work to get done.

2 - As for the "I sure as hell" part, maybe that's why you aren't in business. Considering attorney hourly rates can be several hundred an hour, companies don't mind paying paralegals if they are legitimately getting work done, because it is a lot cheaper. Sure, they may only be saving about $10 an hour with me, but I know for a fact that I get things done in many less hours than a 1L would.

3 - at many law firms paralegals are required to set themselves out as paralegal in email correspondence. This can be accomplished in the same way that first year associates claim they are not admitted to the bar and thus can not give legal advice -- merely by putting a footer in your emails indicating you are a paralegal.

4 - yes, paralegals can make $85k base, depending on the firm

PS - I am a different paralegal than OP


Maybe I am just in a bitchy mood because I'm in the midst of exams. I dunno. But I think you should have been clearer in your initial answers. You made it sound like you were a recent college grad who slipped in a year or two as a paralegal (with a 85K base salary no less) before heading off to law school with tuition re-imbursement and a partnership waiting. I mean, doesn't sound like most paralegal experiences I've heard of or seen.

Of course, paralegals can make good BASE money. Those are career or experienced paralegals. And even ones who aren't can make good money with overtime. My point was you made it sound as though you just graduated and landed a 85K base job.

My paralegal manager did substantive work too - however, they were not paid an associate's salary. My firm capped senior and paralegal managers salaries (because they could do OT) after a certain point so that they could never earn as much as a first year even with OT. Don't know exact numbers, but that's what I was told.

Companies don't mind paying for paralegals, of course not! ANYONE who works on a matter bills the client. But if I am paying for legal counsel and I am hiring an attorney, I want that work to be completed by an attorney, not some one who can pass off as one. There are some things only an attorney can do. That's why you have to pass the bar first, and that's why fortune 500 companies will pay millions to get representation. They need legal counsel. And that means people who have the credentials. Not someone who can pass off as one.

What you described "basic legal research and drafting of contracts and agreements" are not things that a company would exclusively need an attorney to do. I think its almost expected for paralegals to do what you described.

But you said you were doing associate level work - which I took to mean you were doing real substantive work. Saying you were given work that a first year was given is not substantive btw. Paralegals with at least two years under their belt do more than first years. First years have no idea what they're doing. I would say second years don't really either.


There's some confusion here because the user above is a different anonymous user than me, but either way, the situation is very similar.

Sorry if I was unclear before, but FWIW, I was a paralegal at the firm for 3 1/2 years before I decided to go to law school and this offer of tuition/partner was made. Also, I make 85k base and put in NO overtime, and they don't expect me/ask me to put in overtime so I do not make as much as a typical first year associate.


I thought I was talking to you when I was responding to 4-point Anon above, who I guess has now outed himself as Bert. For the record, he actually sounds legit.

And anyways, in a 8-10 attorney office, how many partners can there be? But either way, being offered a partnership even before you've finished your first year (regardless of how long you've worked in whatever capacity you claim) seems waaaaayy of base.

I think there should be more emphasis placed on the fact that very few (and by that I mean 0) paralegals get 85k BASE off the bat right out of college, and those that get that salary are senior or paralegal managers who have worked for YEARS. That salary obviously reflects that. My manager did VERY well for himself, but he had worked there for 9 years.

I would also love to know exactly what "firm" you're at.


I'm going to stop this before I out myself, and I'll let you get back to studying.

But to clarify:

I didn't START at 85k, and I know it's way above what I would make at similar firms. I was offered a base of 65k for example from another firm that does the same kind of work we do.

It is obviously a special case and they don't offer these kinds of deals to everyone here - they have never come close to anything like this. I have not been here for 9 years, just 4, but it seems like they would really like to keep me around after law school.

-Sam

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Re: Are paralegals still in demand after the recession?

Postby Anonymous User » Thu May 06, 2010 7:38 pm

Duralex wrote:I am a paralegal working for a family firm.

The only way this makes sense is if it's a "partner in name only" arrangement--your name moves up on the letterhead, but you get no vote and no equity (and thus no profit share.) Which is a pleasant carrot, but doesn't mean much in the end (except maybe for better leverage in a lateral move.) On the tuition--didn't he say Tier 6? What the hell is Tier 6? Bangalore Academy of Online Jurisprudence? I know he didn't mean Top 6. Right?


I did mean top 6 btw.

-Sam

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Re: Are paralegals still in demand after the recession?

Postby Anonymous User » Mon May 10, 2010 12:12 pm

Kids - you may not believe it, but there's at least one firm in NYC (hint: boutique litigation firm) that pays ~$110k to its first-year paralegals, and much more to second-years. The paralegals are called by a different title, though, and they manage major cases, meet clients, and do a tremendous amount of legal work under the supervision of attorneys. The catch is that they only accept honors graduates of top colleges, and they demand first-rate writing skills and recommendations.

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Re: Are paralegals still in demand after the recession?

Postby Anonymous User » Mon May 10, 2010 12:18 pm

Anonymous User wrote:Kids - you may not believe it, but there's at least one firm in NYC (hint: boutique litigation firm) that pays ~$110k to its first-year paralegals, and much more to second-years. The paralegals are called by a different title, though, and they manage major cases, meet clients, and do a tremendous amount of legal work under the supervision of attorneys. The catch is that they only accept honors graduates of top colleges, and they demand first-rate writing skills and recommendations.


Should specify that's including bonus - no OT pay, because the whole thing is run more like an analyst program at a finance shop.




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