Emailing Associates and Partners

(On Campus Interviews, Summer Associate positions, Firm Reviews, Tips, ...)
Forum rules
Anonymous Posting

Anonymous posting is only appropriate when you are revealing sensitive employment related information about a firm, job, etc. You may anonymously respond on topic to these threads. Unacceptable uses include: harassing another user, joking around, testing the feature, or other things that are more appropriate in the lounge.

Failure to follow these rules will get you outed, warned, or banned.
User avatar
Always Credited
Posts: 2509
Joined: Wed Jun 24, 2009 1:31 pm

Re: Emailing Associates and Partners

Postby Always Credited » Mon Apr 26, 2010 10:14 pm

rando wrote:
romothesavior wrote:
rando wrote:
irie wrote:if you are doing this for a leg-up on your prospects of future employment, don't bother. if an associate isnt busy racking up billable hours and presenting face time at the office they probably have better things to do. a junior partner/counsel has more work and even less time... and i doubt you could convince a more senior partner who bills clients $700-$1100/hour to notice you.


Yes and no. If you are doing it solely for an "in" and not putting in the time necessary to develop a mentor relationship then it won't help. But if you actually develop the relationship (as I had the opportunity to do) then it will absolutely give you a huge leg up if you are dealing with a partner.

I don't think an associate would ever be able to help your future prospects.


Can you give a little more insight as to what you mean by "mentor relationship?" What all is involved in this mentor relationship that you've forged, and how did you go about establishing it?


I actually did just as OP mentioned, e-mailing law firm partners that went to my UG/LS. I used martindale and straight up spammed them. In the end I only heard back from maybe 4 out of ~12ish. And from that ended up having lunch with 3 of them. I still have an e-mail relationship with those 3 and one of them I have had lunch/dinner with him and other associates/partners at his firm maybe a half dozen times.

The first time we had lunch it was very much a "what do you do?" This was pretty genuine on my part as I had no idea what went on at big firms at the time. After that, and I did really well in school, it was spot-checking my resume, mock-interview, or just nothing but getting together and catching up. Right now he is gathering a group of lawyers at his firm that clerked and we're going to do a clerking lunch in the next few weeks as I go through the clerkship application process.

Re; handjobs. It is actually a lot like a courtship process. My fiancee calls him my lawyermatch.com partner. I don't think it is typical to get the same sort of relationship that I have. However, I will say that if you go into these networking relationships with genuine interests in getting to know them and learning about what they do, you have a good shot in developing something worthwhile.


--ImageRemoved--

:lol:

but really, thanks for the candid anecdote. I plan to do something similar during my first semester.

Renzo
Posts: 4265
Joined: Tue Dec 02, 2008 3:23 am

Re: Emailing Associates and Partners

Postby Renzo » Mon Apr 26, 2010 11:55 pm

amyLAchemist wrote:Lawyers are surprisingly willing to do this. I am 3/4 via random completely contact - looking on the website and finding someone in my practice area (2 in asia, and 2 in LA/OC). I wanted to learn more about the field i am going to, and where is a better place to ask? The answer is not the career center.

Plus, you get to practice being in a professional environment and having professional conversation.

Tip I got - be really blatant in your subject with something that will grad their attention like, i.e. (*law school name* 1L, other pertinent things). i.e. I said Boalt Hall (Berkeley Law) 1L, Ph.D. Chemistry, Patent Agent. Seems a bit harsh imo, but it worked for me.

Agreed. In my experience, if they skim your email and it sounds like you're asking them for a job, it's going in the trash. You need to be clear about what you expect from them.

SBimmer
Posts: 47
Joined: Fri Sep 18, 2009 3:27 pm

Re: Emailing Associates and Partners

Postby SBimmer » Tue Apr 27, 2010 8:58 am

rando wrote:By the way. The partner that I ended up forming a great relationship with is the hiring partner at a large atlanta firm. So the above posters who say that busy partners are not going to spend their time on law students are not necessarily correct.


+1 - Many say what they "think" rather than what they "know".

User avatar
edgarderby
Posts: 279
Joined: Tue Aug 14, 2007 2:51 pm

Re: Emailing Associates and Partners

Postby edgarderby » Tue Apr 27, 2010 10:26 am

irie wrote:if you are doing this for a leg-up on your prospects of future employment, don't bother. if an associate isnt busy racking up billable hours and presenting face time at the office they probably have better things to do. a junior partner/counsel has more work and even less time... and i doubt you could convince a more senior partner who bills clients $700-$1100/hour to notice you.

i think you'd have better luck seeking out partners who lecture or serve as adjunct professors at your law school and seeing if you can catch them after class for a chat, i'm sure they would be far more receptive than the ones you approach at their offices.


I had an ND partner alumni set me up with multiple lunches with partners of OTHER firms in his city whom he knew well, partners who weren't even from ND.

I think ND is strongest at this type of networking, but I'm sure it exists for all schools to some degree.

LOL@asking professors for job help. The difference is I was probably the only person that went to lunch with those partners, while profs get asked job questions daily.

User avatar
Matthies
Posts: 1253
Joined: Fri Aug 14, 2009 6:18 pm

Re: Emailing Associates and Partners

Postby Matthies » Tue Apr 27, 2010 10:34 am

amyLAchemist wrote:Lawyers are surprisingly willing to do this. I am 3/4 via random completely contact - looking on the website and finding someone in my practice area (2 in asia, and 2 in LA/OC). I wanted to learn more about the field i am going to, and where is a better place to ask? The answer is not the career center.

Plus, you get to practice being in a professional environment and having professional conversation.

Tip I got - be really blatant in your subject with something that will grad their attention like, i.e. (*law school name* 1L, other pertinent things). i.e. I said Boalt Hall (Berkeley Law) 1L, Ph.D. Chemistry, Patent Agent. Seems a bit harsh imo, but it worked for me.


All of this is good advice in this post. To add to Amy's point about 3/4 you will find several people who say no or don't respond, or do but you don't really connect with, fine, move on, keep asking, don't give up if 1 or 2 people say no. People like feeling needed, lawyers like feeling needed more than most, the chance to shape young mushy minds is almost inristable to many. While I agree, young associates 1-3 years are not as helpful to know as a hiring partner, every cotact helps becuase if they like you they will into you to thier contatcs, so don't rule out younger associates as well. They often have better tips on recent job search stuff as well, but a good mix is best, sometimes young assscoaites don't know what the hell they are doing as well.

PS you should do this all trhough LS, joining the local bar assn is a good way to meet people as well, as are Inns of Court

jnorsky
Posts: 201
Joined: Fri Jun 26, 2009 12:26 pm

Re: Emailing Associates and Partners

Postby jnorsky » Tue Apr 27, 2010 10:43 am

So is emailing partners the way to go? Or should I email both associates and partners? I figure associates would be good just cause I might have more in common with them.

User avatar
enygma
Posts: 237
Joined: Tue Jun 24, 2008 7:03 pm

Re: Emailing Associates and Partners

Postby enygma » Wed Apr 28, 2010 9:22 am

what's the etiquette on going to lunch/coffee/beer with the partner? should you pay for their meal, etc?

rando
Posts: 908
Joined: Tue Mar 09, 2010 1:57 pm

Re: Emailing Associates and Partners

Postby rando » Wed Apr 28, 2010 9:29 am

enygma wrote:what's the etiquette on going to lunch/coffee/beer with the partner? should you pay for their meal, etc?


IME they always pay. On the first meet I always pull out my wallet and offer and they have turned me down every time. If you're meeting an associate on the other hand, the payment is much less likely to come out of the firm's account so you should try harder to pay your own way.

Anonymous User
Posts: 273601
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Re: Emailing Associates and Partners

Postby Anonymous User » Wed Apr 28, 2010 12:12 pm

rando wrote:
enygma wrote:what's the etiquette on going to lunch/coffee/beer with the partner? should you pay for their meal, etc?


IME they always pay. On the first meet I always pull out my wallet and offer and they have turned me down every time. If you're meeting an associate on the other hand, the payment is much less likely to come out of the firm's account so you should try harder to pay your own way.


loL, reverse psychology! nice!

rando
Posts: 908
Joined: Tue Mar 09, 2010 1:57 pm

Re: Emailing Associates and Partners

Postby rando » Thu Apr 29, 2010 10:45 am

Anonymous User wrote:
rando wrote:
enygma wrote:what's the etiquette on going to lunch/coffee/beer with the partner? should you pay for their meal, etc?


IME they always pay. On the first meet I always pull out my wallet and offer and they have turned me down every time. If you're meeting an associate on the other hand, the payment is much less likely to come out of the firm's account so you should try harder to pay your own way.


loL, reverse psychology! nice!


Haha. It's not that I'm not willing to pay, but I think they appreciate the gesture. Honestly, it is an awkward 15sec no matter how you go about it.

SBimmer
Posts: 47
Joined: Fri Sep 18, 2009 3:27 pm

Re: Emailing Associates and Partners

Postby SBimmer » Thu Apr 29, 2010 11:07 am

rando wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
rando wrote:
enygma wrote:what's the etiquette on going to lunch/coffee/beer with the partner? should you pay for their meal, etc?


IME they always pay. On the first meet I always pull out my wallet and offer and they have turned me down every time. If you're meeting an associate on the other hand, the payment is much less likely to come out of the firm's account so you should try harder to pay your own way.


loL, reverse psychology! nice!


Haha. It's not that I'm not willing to pay, but I think they appreciate the gesture. Honestly, it is an awkward 15sec no matter how you go about it.


Rando: You always have the option of treating the partner/associate.

rando
Posts: 908
Joined: Tue Mar 09, 2010 1:57 pm

Re: Emailing Associates and Partners

Postby rando » Thu Apr 29, 2010 11:13 am

SBimmer wrote:loL, reverse psychology! nice!


Haha. It's not that I'm not willing to pay, but I think they appreciate the gesture. Honestly, it is an awkward 15sec no matter how you go about it.


Rando: You always have the option of treating the partner/associate.


Like I said above, when you are with an associate etiquette is that you pay your own way. Every single time I have eaten a meal with a partner they have told me to put my wallet away. The above poster who said "reverse psychology" clearly misread my post.

I know for a fact that most of these meals come out of firm recruiting budgets when you are dining with a partner and they treat it as such. I would like to see you argue with a partner who tells you that you will not be paying for the meal.

SBimmer
Posts: 47
Joined: Fri Sep 18, 2009 3:27 pm

Re: Emailing Associates and Partners

Postby SBimmer » Thu Apr 29, 2010 11:26 am

rando wrote:
SBimmer wrote:loL, reverse psychology! nice!


Haha. It's not that I'm not willing to pay, but I think they appreciate the gesture. Honestly, it is an awkward 15sec no matter how you go about it.


Rando: You always have the option of treating the partner/associate.


Like I said above, when you are with an associate etiquette is that you pay your own way. Every single time I have eaten a meal with a partner they have told me to put my wallet away. The above poster who said "reverse psychology" clearly misread my post.

I know for a fact that most of these meals come out of firm recruiting budgets when you are dining with a partner and they treat it as such. I would like to see you argue with a partner who tells you that you will not be paying for the meal.


Correcto - Do as the partner says. However, I had lunch with a partner and we ate at a cafeteria-style place. I was ahead of him in line and I paid for my own food. :cry: The partner and I are having dinner next week, and I suspect he'll pay the tab. :D

User avatar
futurelawyer413
Posts: 116
Joined: Mon Oct 29, 2007 8:15 pm

Re: Emailing Associates and Partners

Postby futurelawyer413 » Thu Apr 29, 2010 11:31 am

rando wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:
rando wrote:
enygma wrote:what's the etiquette on going to lunch/coffee/beer with the partner? should you pay for their meal, etc?


IME they always pay. On the first meet I always pull out my wallet and offer and they have turned me down every time. If you're meeting an associate on the other hand, the payment is much less likely to come out of the firm's account so you should try harder to pay your own way.


loL, reverse psychology! nice!


Haha. It's not that I'm not willing to pay, but I think they appreciate the gesture. Honestly, it is an awkward 15sec no matter how you go about it.


i was just kidding! in all seriousness though - i do agree that those 15 secs can be pretty awkward and it is always a professional gesture

EDit - just realized i posted as the Anonymous User, oh well! nothing to hide here haha
Last edited by futurelawyer413 on Thu Apr 29, 2010 11:34 am, edited 1 time in total.

rando
Posts: 908
Joined: Tue Mar 09, 2010 1:57 pm

Re: Emailing Associates and Partners

Postby rando » Thu Apr 29, 2010 11:32 am

SBimmer wrote:
Correcto - Do as the partner says. However, I had lunch with a partner and we ate at a cafeteria-style place. I was ahead of him in line and I paid for my own food. :cry: The partner and I are having dinner next week, and I suspect he'll pay the tab. :D


Ha - yes. In that situation I can absolutely see the dilemma.

What most of the above anecdote was geared at was a repeat encounter with the same partner. After the first time we ate together and he told me to put away the wallet, every time in the future is sort of that weird purgatory of pulling out the wallet and him saying "haven't we been over this? put away your money."

SBimmer
Posts: 47
Joined: Fri Sep 18, 2009 3:27 pm

Re: Emailing Associates and Partners

Postby SBimmer » Thu Apr 29, 2010 11:43 am

rando wrote:
SBimmer wrote:
Correcto - Do as the partner says. However, I had lunch with a partner and we ate at a cafeteria-style place. I was ahead of him in line and I paid for my own food. :cry: The partner and I are having dinner next week, and I suspect he'll pay the tab. :D


Ha - yes. In that situation I can absolutely see the dilemma.

What most of the above anecdote was geared at was a repeat encounter with the same partner. After the first time we ate together and he told me to put away the wallet, every time in the future is sort of that weird purgatory of pulling out the wallet and him saying "haven't we been over this? put away your money."


I completely understand/agree. I'll at least pull out my wallet after our first formal meal to pay my share and see what he says. I venture to guess that he'll pay the bill.

P.S. I'm glad the partner is taking the time mentor/groom me, and I'm perfectly fine paying for my food.




Return to “Legal Employment”

Who is online

The online users are hidden on this forum.