Going to LS and Not Practicing Law

(On Campus Interviews, Summer Associate positions, Firm Reviews, Tips, ...)
Forum rules
Anonymous Posting

Anonymous posting is only appropriate when you are revealing sensitive employment related information about a firm, job, etc. You may anonymously respond on topic to these threads. Unacceptable uses include: harassing another user, joking around, testing the feature, or other things that are more appropriate in the lounge.

Failure to follow these rules will get you outed, warned, or banned.
09042014
Posts: 18282
Joined: Wed Oct 14, 2009 10:47 pm

Re: Going to LS and Not Practicing Law

Postby 09042014 » Wed Feb 24, 2010 3:51 pm

My post JD career is a Used BMW salesman.

User avatar
sky7
Posts: 248
Joined: Tue Dec 04, 2007 2:44 pm

Re: Going to LS and Not Practicing Law

Postby sky7 » Wed Feb 24, 2010 3:56 pm

This is almost exactly what I'm doing, actually.

I'm working full time, and have the ability to pay for law school out of my wages, so no debt.

Honestly, it just seemed like an interesting thing to do - odds are I'll end up working for a consulting firm or government agency, and will never practice. That's completely fine with me. I'm pretty sure I'll be plenty successful, and I'm positive that my law degree will help.

User avatar
sky7
Posts: 248
Joined: Tue Dec 04, 2007 2:44 pm

Re: Going to LS and Not Practicing Law

Postby sky7 » Wed Feb 24, 2010 3:58 pm

SteelReserve wrote:You want to learn law? Go pick up the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure and the Federal Rules of Evidence. Read them. Then come back to this forum and tell me you want to pay money to learn law for three years with no intention of practicing.


This isn't particularly accurate. It's the application of principles, the subtle distinction between arguments, etc, that will make a person with a JD stand out. It's why there are many JDs working in the intel analysis field.

User avatar
A'nold
Posts: 3622
Joined: Sat Oct 04, 2008 9:07 pm

Re: Going to LS and Not Practicing Law

Postby A'nold » Wed Feb 24, 2010 5:38 pm

sky7 wrote:This is almost exactly what I'm doing, actually.

I'm working full time, and have the ability to pay for law school out of my wages, so no debt.

Honestly, it just seemed like an interesting thing to do - odds are I'll end up working for a consulting firm or government agency, and will never practice. That's completely fine with me. I'm pretty sure I'll be plenty successful, and I'm positive that my law degree will help.



I could see this, but I like academia. My thoughts: if you just keep going on your path in life and gaining valuable work experience and not relying on the JD to GET a job, it will probably pay off in the long run with future job opportunities coupled w/ experience, at least it won't hurt. However, if you are pursuing a JD to get a non-law job, I think you will be a VERY sad puppy.

User avatar
PigNipple
Posts: 77
Joined: Sat Feb 20, 2010 3:57 pm

Re: Going to LS and Not Practicing Law

Postby PigNipple » Wed Feb 24, 2010 5:56 pm

Most government, at least SD county where I worked through college, will accept a JD in favor of an MBA or MPA as a prerequisite for administrative positions - and they do pretty well. Also, I took my undergrad Poly Sci class with a professor who's only grad work was a JD. At least it can't be said to be detrimental to your career, crazy.

User avatar
sky7
Posts: 248
Joined: Tue Dec 04, 2007 2:44 pm

Re: Going to LS and Not Practicing Law

Postby sky7 » Wed Feb 24, 2010 11:32 pm

A'nold wrote:
sky7 wrote:This is almost exactly what I'm doing, actually.

I'm working full time, and have the ability to pay for law school out of my wages, so no debt.

Honestly, it just seemed like an interesting thing to do - odds are I'll end up working for a consulting firm or government agency, and will never practice. That's completely fine with me. I'm pretty sure I'll be plenty successful, and I'm positive that my law degree will help.



I could see this, but I like academia. My thoughts: if you just keep going on your path in life and gaining valuable work experience and not relying on the JD to GET a job, it will probably pay off in the long run with future job opportunities coupled w/ experience, at least it won't hurt. However, if you are pursuing a JD to get a non-law job, I think you will be a VERY sad puppy.


Eh, I still disagree, though I think it depends on the job. If you were deadset on being an I-Banker, and you decided to get a law degree, I'd mostly agree with you. If you wanted to do miscellaneous government work, work on the Hill, lobby, work as a consultant, etc, I think that a law degree will only help you. Help you as much as 3 years of experience in the field? Probably not. But then again, that's why I'm going part-time :)

bigben
Posts: 703
Joined: Sat Sep 29, 2007 2:44 pm

Re: Going to LS and Not Practicing Law

Postby bigben » Tue Mar 02, 2010 6:01 pm

PigNipple wrote:A law degree is extremely versatile. In fact, this is the reason for the not too uncommon MBA/JD.. Understanding the law is helpful in many areas, and especially in business - just ask Mitt Romney, who used his education to make Bain Capital into a money making machine. He never practiced law.


He did not use his education to do this. Especially not his JD.

bigben
Posts: 703
Joined: Sat Sep 29, 2007 2:44 pm

Re: Going to LS and Not Practicing Law

Postby bigben » Tue Mar 02, 2010 6:26 pm

Close Diamond wrote:Has no one here ever studied something out of interest and with no intention of pursuing it as a profession (even though it still may aid you in your career)? This doesn't seem too uncommon. In fact, one of the PS examples on this very website is written by a person who wants to go to law school in order to help him run his business. I would consider that situation a case of going to law school with no intention of practicing law.


I can understand why you would think this. But a JD is not going to help anyone run a business.

Putting your knowledge of the law into practical use requires that you dedicate at least a good portion of your career to developing knowledge and expertise in a specific type of practice. As a business person, you're just not getting any practical value from your knowledge of the law. To do so, you would have to be spending all your time researching legal issues. Then you are not really a business person, you are a lawyer.

The next thing people trot out is the idea that some nebulous critical thinking ability is bestowed upon you when you go to law school. Two points. First, sure, law school helps your critical thinking skills. But if that is your goal, law school must be the least efficient way that you could possibly dream of to achieve it. Second, no, law school does not help you develop critical thinking skills. What it actually does is help you develop a fine tuned analytical ability. I would not call that critical thinking per se. In fact, I wold argue that the type of thinking you learn in law school is actually very ill-suited to running a business. It revolves around dreaming up endless flaws in everything and teasing out obscure minutiae. That and being really good at important things like commas and italicizing things in word documents.

270910
Posts: 2437
Joined: Thu May 21, 2009 9:51 pm

Re: Going to LS and Not Practicing Law

Postby 270910 » Tue Mar 02, 2010 6:27 pm

bigben wrote:The next thing people trot out is the idea that some nebulous critical thinking ability is bestowed upon you when you go to law school. Two points. First, sure, law school helps your critical thinking skills. But if that is your goal, law school must be the least efficient way that you could possibly dream of to achieve it. Second, no, law school does not help you develop critical thinking skills. What it actually does is help you develop a fine tuned analytical ability. I would not call that critical thinking per se. In fact, I wold argue that the type of thinking you learn in law school is actually very ill-suited to running a business. It revolves around dreaming up endless flaws in everything and teasing out obscure minutiae. That and being really good at important things like commas and italicizing things in word documents.


Let's bronze that and put it on a statue out front.

bigben
Posts: 703
Joined: Sat Sep 29, 2007 2:44 pm

Re: Going to LS and Not Practicing Law

Postby bigben » Tue Mar 02, 2010 6:32 pm

disco_barred wrote:
PigNipple wrote:A law degree is extremely versatile. In fact, this is the reason for the not too uncommon MBA/JD.. Understanding the law is helpful in many areas, and especially in business - just ask Mitt Romney, who used his education to make Bain Capital into a money making machine. He never practiced law.


Ugh. These points fucking drive me crazy.

A slim number of extremely capable and connected people get JDs, never practice law, and have lucrative careers. The OVERWHELMING MAJORITY of people who get JDs, even from top law schools, face the tragic choice upon graduation of practicing law, or falling back on a career for which the JD either does not help or is actively detrimental.

The 'versatile' JD is a myth perpetuated by a few compelling anecdotes. As long as it's either practicing law or something you could have done without a JD, a JD will help you do it :P


Every degree is versatile in a sense. You are always free to do something completely unrelated to it! There is no law against this.

bigben
Posts: 703
Joined: Sat Sep 29, 2007 2:44 pm

Re: Going to LS and Not Practicing Law

Postby bigben » Tue Mar 02, 2010 6:33 pm

kittenmittons wrote:
PigNipple wrote:
disco_barred wrote:The OVERWHELMING MAJORITY of people who get JDs, even from top law schools, face the tragic choice upon graduation of practicing law, or falling back on a career for which the JD either does not help or is actively detrimental.


False.


Yeah, it's a false dichotomy. JDs don't help for the practice of law either.


Excellent.




Return to “Legal Employment”

Who is online

The online users are hidden on this forum.