Intellectual Property job market competitiveness

(On Campus Interviews, Summer Associate positions, Firm Reviews, Tips, ...)
Forum rules
Anonymous Posting

Anonymous posting is only appropriate when you are revealing sensitive employment related information about a firm, job, etc. You may anonymously respond on topic to these threads. Unacceptable uses include: harassing another user, joking around, testing the feature, or other things that are more appropriate in the lounge.

Failure to follow these rules will get you outed, warned, or banned.
bandbun
Posts: 1
Joined: Sat Feb 13, 2010 6:09 am

Intellectual Property job market competitiveness

Postby bandbun » Sat Feb 13, 2010 8:51 pm

Hi, I am currently a 0L that will attend Boalt this Fall. I am a Management Science Major (mathematics/finance) but have previously taken courses in physics, chemistry and biology. If I take a few science courses this summer, I can qualify to take the USPTO Patent Bar Exam. I am interested in practicing in Intellectual Property, whether it be trademarks, patents, or another category. With my non-technical major, do I still have a shot at practicing IP law, or will taking the Patent Bar be a waste of time due to my technically weak background?

User avatar
Georgiana
Posts: 647
Joined: Wed Jul 22, 2009 5:42 pm

Re: Intellectual Property job market competitiveness

Postby Georgiana » Sun Feb 14, 2010 11:12 am

bandbun wrote:Hi, I am currently a 0L that will attend Boalt this Fall. I am a Management Science Major (mathematics/finance) but have previously taken courses in physics, chemistry and biology. If I take a few science courses this summer, I can qualify to take the USPTO Patent Bar Exam. I am interested in practicing in Intellectual Property, whether it be trademarks, patents, or another category. With my non-technical major, do I still have a shot at practicing IP law, or will taking the Patent Bar be a waste of time due to my technically weak background?

Taking the patent bar will be pointless because you won't be getting a job in patent prosecution. You can still pursue patent litigation, copyright, or trademarks.

fortissimo
Posts: 597
Joined: Sun Jan 24, 2010 11:05 am

Re: Intellectual Property job market competitiveness

Postby fortissimo » Sun Feb 14, 2010 10:04 pm

Pointless. Most IP firms want people with at least a master's degree in science.

User avatar
dood
Posts: 1639
Joined: Tue Apr 21, 2009 11:59 am

Re: Intellectual Property job market competitiveness

Postby dood » Sun Feb 14, 2010 10:24 pm

...
Last edited by dood on Tue Jun 29, 2010 9:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.

fortissimo
Posts: 597
Joined: Sun Jan 24, 2010 11:05 am

Re: Intellectual Property job market competitiveness

Postby fortissimo » Sun Feb 14, 2010 10:34 pm

dood wrote:
fortissimo wrote:Pointless. Most IP firms want people with at least a master's degree in science.


That's a pretty bold and unsubstantiated statement. There are many circumstances that make every situation different, i.e. what kind of practice (litigation, prosecution), what type of firm (BigLaw), relevant work experience, and of course your degree. You can make a generalization that most firms require a hard science background, especially for prosecution. But the higher level of education only really comes into play in biosciences.


Helped my buddy bid at OCI and all the biglaw IP firms we looked up wanted MS's+.

LawSchoolWannaBe
Posts: 212
Joined: Sun Oct 21, 2007 12:57 am

Re: Intellectual Property job market competitiveness

Postby LawSchoolWannaBe » Sun Feb 14, 2010 11:21 pm

fortissimo wrote:
dood wrote:
fortissimo wrote:Pointless. Most IP firms want people with at least a master's degree in science.


That's a pretty bold and unsubstantiated statement. There are many circumstances that make every situation different, i.e. what kind of practice (litigation, prosecution), what type of firm (BigLaw), relevant work experience, and of course your degree. You can make a generalization that most firms require a hard science background, especially for prosecution. But the higher level of education only really comes into play in biosciences.


Helped my buddy bid at OCI and all the biglaw IP firms we looked up wanted MS's+.


BS is normally fine for most engineering disciplines. The MS requirement is normally for bio/chem backgrounds.

Anonymous User
Posts: 273567
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Re: Intellectual Property job market competitiveness

Postby Anonymous User » Mon Feb 15, 2010 2:05 pm

Taking the patent bar can serve three purposes other than to allow you to do prosecution -

1) It shows commitment to IP while you're going through OCI. If you're background doesn't already scream IP, it can be a nice way to demonstrate that commitment.

2) It lets you learn a bit of the IP culture. Taking and passing the patent bar is a shared experience amongst IP folk and seems to come up relatively often in conversation. If you don't take it you miss out on these "bonding" conversations and jokes.

3) Clients like to see it, even if you are a patent litigator. I'm planning on doing only litigation and my firm (V20) which doesn't do an ounce of prosecution asked me to take the patent bar because it makes clients happy. Just an extra "gold star" for the website and my resume.

If you want to do work in patents, it certainly won't hurt to take the patent bar. However, it will not give you any sort of "bump" during OCI without a background that would allow you to do prosecution (graduate degree in hard sciences or engineering degree).

User avatar
wiseowl
Posts: 1071
Joined: Thu Jul 03, 2008 4:38 pm

Re: Intellectual Property job market competitiveness

Postby wiseowl » Mon Feb 15, 2010 6:27 pm

Anonymous User wrote:Taking the patent bar can serve three purposes other than to allow you to do prosecution -

1) It shows commitment to IP while you're going through OCI. If you're background doesn't already scream IP, it can be a nice way to demonstrate that commitment.

2) It lets you learn a bit of the IP culture. Taking and passing the patent bar is a shared experience amongst IP folk and seems to come up relatively often in conversation. If you don't take it you miss out on these "bonding" conversations and jokes.

3) Clients like to see it, even if you are a patent litigator. I'm planning on doing only litigation and my firm (V20) which doesn't do an ounce of prosecution asked me to take the patent bar because it makes clients happy. Just an extra "gold star" for the website and my resume.

If you want to do work in patents, it certainly won't hurt to take the patent bar. However, it will not give you any sort of "bump" during OCI without a background that would allow you to do prosecution (graduate degree in hard sciences or engineering degree).


to be fair, the patent bar costs $240 plus the cost of prep. whether thats worth it to you to anecdotally "show commitment" when realistically you'll probably only prosecute if you're a solo is an open question.

Danneskjöld
Posts: 73
Joined: Thu Sep 03, 2009 10:54 pm

Re: Intellectual Property job market competitiveness

Postby Danneskjöld » Mon Feb 15, 2010 6:41 pm

Assuming you're talking about biglaw: It will be something to talk about in interviews, but beyond that it won't matter much. An ee degree, for example, with no reg number is worth 10x a reg number with a non-technical ug degree.

What could help is if you came from a strong technical UG or a top ivy with a strong science or math curriculum, so that would be schools like: MIT, Stanford, Harvard, Princeton, Penn... Pedigree always matters.

The top ip firms hire out of Berkeley, but because Berkeley is so well known for IP, a lot of people with PhDs and engineering degree come. So you'll have some tough competition.

Quite frankly, what will matter more than ANYTHING else for you will be your grades. Lots of HHs your first year, and you'll be solid regardless. Lots of Ps, and you're in trouble regardless.

Good luck...

Anonymous User
Posts: 273567
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Re: Intellectual Property job market competitiveness

Postby Anonymous User » Mon Feb 15, 2010 7:39 pm

uhh the patent bar is $240 to register to take the exam. To actually take it is another $150 and to register after you pass (assuming you do) is another $100 so it is a $490 investment not $240. It's even better when the firm you summered for picks up the tab for it. So i would say wait.

having a reg number before you graduate is worth it if you worked at the patent office or prosecuted patents before. All firms really care about is that you can take it. I would be hard pressed to find a firm that was impressed by a reg number with no experience.

as said before put on your resume that you are eligible, if you aren't then dont.
most important get good grades.
next most important is good grades and then right after that is good grades.




Return to “Legal Employment”

Who is online

The online users are hidden on this forum.