Prestige Important in Tax Law?

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Anonymous User
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Prestige Important in Tax Law?

Postby Anonymous User » Sat Jan 09, 2010 6:45 pm

Title basically says it. I want to do tax law, but I don't have amazing grades (contrary to what you'd think, accounting is actually somewhat challenging), so the T14 is basically out of the question. Therefore, I was wondering if its still possible to do well as a tax attorney without a T14 degree.

thanks

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chadwick218
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Re: Prestige Important in Tax Law?

Postby chadwick218 » Sat Jan 09, 2010 6:48 pm

Anonymous User wrote:Title basically says it. I want to do tax law, but I don't have amazing grades (contrary to what you'd think, accounting is actually somewhat challenging), so the T14 is basically out of the question. Therefore, I was wondering if its still possible to do well as a tax attorney without a T14 degree.

thanks


As with any other legal field, it certainly possible to do tax law without going to a T14 ... it's just that you are unlikely to crack a job with any of the elite firms that focus heavily on tax law. Another option is looking at an LLM in Taxation after graduation. You have options with the likes of NYU, GULC, and NU.

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nealric
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Re: Prestige Important in Tax Law?

Postby nealric » Sat Jan 09, 2010 11:40 pm

Corporate tax stuff is arguably even more prestige obsessed. If you look at the bios of biglaw tax partners, they are often more prestigious academically than the average lawyer.

By contrast, anybody can hang a shingle doing estate planning. A CPA/JD could probably put together a pretty good solo practice.




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