Real World Virgins: An Argument for Work Experience

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Pearalegal
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Real World Virgins: An Argument for Work Experience

Postby Pearalegal » Tue Aug 10, 2010 2:13 am

Real World Virgins:
An Argument to Deflower Yourself and Get a Job Before Law School

(For those who are wavering between going straight through or taking time off)

While I’m sure the decision to go straight from undergrad to law school is the right thing for some people, that decision was not the right one for me. I benefited from working in the legal world, so take my advice with that in mind, but I tried to gear this towards any work experience more generally. Please don't take this article to mean that I think the "right" thing to do is work before law school. I just found that I really benefited from working first, and wanted to share my thoughts in case anyone was wavering.

I’m writing for the average law applicant. You know, the middle-class kids who maybe have a few lawyers in their family, maybe not. Supportive parents both emotionally and financially, smart kids, interest in the law. Some internships, some extracurricular activities and hopefully a part-time job or two. Probably owns a polo or two. Has enough of an obsessive streak to join a pre-law Internet forum.

I’m writing for them. Or in other words, me a few years ago. I realize the first objection that could be raised to my article is that I’m just beginning my law school journey. Consider this a compilation of my own limited life experience and the advice of the attorneys I’ve worked for and with. However, in the years I’ve spent between college and now, beginning law school, I’ve learned some lessons and matured in ways that would benefit me no matter what career path I chose.

First of all, I Don’t Care That You’ve Known Forever, Ever That All You’ve Wanted To Be Is A Lawyer
You’ll still know that in a year or two and you’ll be able to pair that passion (for a subject you haven’t yet studied) with all the lessons we’re about to discuss that you’ve learned in the real world.

I’m writing this assuming that you don’t change your mind about entering into the law. I think it goes without saying that if you take a few years off for work experience, you’ll be much more confident about going into a particular profession. I’m not going to lecture on that. I’m lecturing why its worth it to take time off regardless if your passion for the law stays the same or even increases (mine did).

If You Spend Your Time “Off” Traveling on Your Parent’s Dime…
Eff you. Get a job. :wink: See the thread title. While traveling is great at all, and can have its own benefits, I don’t think they compare to having a job. That said, if you save up enough/have nice enough parents who will help you travel for a month or so before you start law school? Dude, that’s awesome. I do (and my attorneys all encouraged this as well) recommend leaving your job a month or two before law school starts to decompress. If you can do that in Europe or what have you, even better.


There Are Professional Benefits

Even if your internships were demanding, there is an entirely different mindset when you’re in a position that you aren’t expected to leave in three months.

First Good Reason This Should Matter to You: The “Rewarding” Work
While I suppose there are some positions for new grads out there that are fascinating (and congrats to anyone who gets them), at some point in your first job you will most likely be working on some mind-numbing projects. You will do data-entry and you will complete menial tasks and get no acknowledgment for them. Why is this a good thing?

1) Because you’ll hopefully learn that as a new college graduate, you aren’t entitled to anything.
My biggest pet peeve was watching my fellow entry-level pals say things like, “this isn’t why I went to college,” or “this is so boring, I’m much smarter than (random task).” Well, duh. I’d hope anyone with a bachelor’s degree could do data-entry (actually, I’d hope ANYONE could do data-entry).

The point is, as a new grad you’re not qualified to do anything. You graduated college, yay! So did almost everyone who you’ll ever be competing with in the work world. Now show you can actually be mature enough to take on boring projects with a smile, learn insane attention to detail so your superior doesn’t have to look over your shoulder and perhaps most importantly, learn how to gracefully admit to your mistakes (because you will make them) and fix them efficiently and effectively.

2) You’ll most likely get chewed out for forgetting to dot an “i” or something else you didn’t realize matters, which is a life lesson that everyone should have before entering into a career.
Ah, the first time I was made to feel like a stupid, stupid bug by a work superior. It was awful. The only good part about it was that I didn’t break down and cry in front of the woman (that would come later that night over a bottle of wine and during a viewing of a favorite childhood movie).

We relatively privileged kids are pampered and outside of our parents, have generally never been made to feel like crap. Developing thick “work” skin can only be achieved through…work.

I thought I was prepared for anything after middle school, but learning how to deal with a bullying boss with a smile? Oosh. Whole new skill set.

3) You learn to have confidence with no reassurance.
In school, we get constant feedback on our papers, tests and class discussions. If you work like hell on an essay, you get an A to show for it. Whoot! Shot time!

At work, you work like hell on a project and might get a, “thanks.” (Whoot! Shot time!)

It surprised me how hard this change was to adjust to. The first time I handed over an assignment I had worked through the night on, the associate looked at it and then immediately gave me another assignment without a word of thanks. It was a kick in the stomach.

I was constantly worrying I wasn’t living up to standards, or was disliked by my superiors. It took me awhile to get over that insecurity, especially because it was an insecurity I hadn’t realized existed within me until the age of 22. I think a lot of ambitious young people who are used to good grades and praise from professors have the same problem. We’re used to being told we’re good and we’re used to hearing it a lot. Doesn’t happen as often in the professional world (shocker, I know).

Second Good Reason This Should Matter To You: Networking
There are a lot of ways to network. I don’t pretend I possess an impressive amount of grace in this area, but I have learned a few things.

1) Superiors can be your friends. Sometimes.
While anyone with any social skills whatsoever won’t do anything too egregious, you will develop friendly relationships with people who are much more senior to you (both in age and career-level). I was scared the first time a partner came up to chat with me at a social function, and now I wouldn’t even blink.

Obviously, there is certainly a line to toe. These people are still who you work for. Casual conversation, joking around—all fine. However, these people aren’t your peers. Work experience helps you learn this line more instinctively.

I would watch some of the younger summer associates obviously have no idea how casual or formal to be with partners, and I consider myself lucky that I have at least some experience in such things before I’m competing with my equally intelligent and ambitious fellow law students for a permanent position.

2) Superiors will like you, as long as you don’t screw around.
They will give you more challenging work and they will want to put you in contact with people who will help you. They will be a point of contact throughout your career. These are all positive things for obvious reasons.

3) You will learn not to have the right amount of drinks at the work happy hour or holiday party (or if you don’t drink, you learn the right level of sober bubbly to be).
Admittedly, this will be more of a problem for some people than others. Drinking with colleagues and superiors is a strange thing—most people will want you to cut a little loose and have some fun. You don’t want to be the stiff in the corner acting like office hours are still on, but you also don’t want to be the “drunk one.”

This might sound obvious, but a work drinking function has a very unique feel to it that one can only learn to navigate by being there. People do make fools of themselves, usually to no really bad consequence at work, but I don’t think anyone has ever enjoyed being the center of office gossip. It is much harder to laugh off stupid stuff you did at a work function than something you did at a bar in college.

Of course, I suppose there are some places that don’t drink at all, but a law firm isn’t going to be one of them.

4) You learn that there are genuinely good times to be had at work.
No, really. A sense of camaraderie, of a job well done, of celebrating a successful project together. Work husbands and wives. Genuine friends you make at work. While work (and your eventual career) should be taken seriously, you also need to realize that if you only make work about work, especially in as demanding a career as the law, you’ll be miserable.

Basically, you learn to lighten up.


There Are Personal Benefits

Hopefully you’ll be able to find a job with similar hours that you’ll experience as an attorney (and I don’t care what sector you work in, you’ll be working A LOT as a young attorney). You’ll learn the joys of HR, of employee benefits and of being so tired you want to die. Oh yeah, and you’ll hopefully start to learn that whole work/life balance.

First Good Reason This Should Matter To You: MONEY
I don’t think anything helped me personally mature more than to be in charge and responsible for my own finances.

1) You’ll learn to pay your own bills.
For the love of Pete, take this chance to cut any remaining financial ties to your parents. I was lucky enough to have my parents help out a lot (ok, almost entirely) with undergrad. This is an incredible gift and I will always be thankful that my parents saved and wanted to provide me with such financial help. I realize most people aren’t as lucky as me, but I do notice that most people I know who go through law school come from similar financial backgrounds.

However, after working for two years, I understand all the fascinating intricacies of utilities. Of cable and internet packages. Of, “oh shit, I bought all those people their drinks last night!?!?!?! I can’t afford that!!!!! What the hell was I thinking?!!! Of credit cards, of parking tickets.

Budgeting. It’s a blast.

2) Employee Benefits Packages.
Insurance is confusing. Seriously. It took me a long time to fully understand what my benefits meant, and to stop losing my insurance card.

Second Good Reason This Should Matter To You: Getting Laid.
Ha, ok, I just thought that was a more interesting title than “friendships and boyfriend/girlfriends.” However, your relationships with your friends and significant others will change with your first job. In college, you had a whole lot of time to hang out. While you have free time while working, there will be a lot less of it.

1) You will not be surrounded by people your age.
Generally speaking, the social arena is brand new even if you work with a bunch of people your age. You don’t have a ready-made group of friends and if you’re in a new city, you learn to deal with loneliness and making friends in new ways. Self-reliance becomes essential. So does drinking alone. No, I’m kidding.

It’s harder to make friends, and it’s definitely harder to meet a special someone. You learn to be more outgoing and more comfortable being alone. Some people will have no trouble adjusting; some will be sad sacks for a little while until they give themselves a kick in the butt.

You learn how to be friends with your coworkers and yes, you learn that all the things people say about the dangers of getting involved with a coworker are for real for real. Hopefully you won’t experience such a situation, but trust me, working with a pair who have landed themselves in a bad romantic predicament is uncomfortable enough.

2) You will have to tell your boyfriend or girlfriend that you can’t have dinner with them, because you’re too busy (at work).
While in college, if you canceled plans unexpectedly, or had limited amount of time to spend with your special friend, you were generally being a jerk. Not so when you have to cozy up with an excel spreadsheet instead of your honey.

Learning not to pout about having to do so, and not pouting when your significant other has to do the same is a good life lesson.

Third Good Reason This Should Matter to You: Putting in the Overtime
Admittedly, this only applies if you have a job with similar hours to the legal profession (which again, I really encourage). You learn what sort of work schedule you can be happy with. Granted, most young twentysomethings aren’t dealing with the pressures of a marriage and kids that will crop up later, but you’ll begin to get a feel.


Skills for Law School and Law School Admissions

I’ll wrap up my article with two last pieces of advice/reasons to take some time off.

1) You’re more efficient in law school.
While being a paralegal has specifically helped me learn the mechanics of the practice of law and cite-checking, more generally…you learn how to work continuously for eight hours a day. My attorneys who worked before law school all agree the students who had developed the mental discipline to work in the middle of classes through the day had a much easier time having a life outside of law school and relaxing at the end of the night.

Maybe you developed this skill in college. I really, really didn’t.

I was going through several trials while studying for the LSAT. While I don’t really recommend such a thing, I did certainly learn how to budget my time and be successful.

2) You learn that the question, “will working before law school help me get into a top school?” is silly.
Simply put, working made me realize that working for a few years gave me some incredible life lessons that had nothing to do with law school admissions. Yes, Northwestern likes work experience. Yes, working can help you downplay a lower GPA. Yes, a good resume never hurts any admissions package.

However, I’m almost positive I would have had the same admissions cycle with or without my job.

I truly believe that working before going back to school allows you to learn lessons that more than outweigh any admissions hooplah.


In Conclusion…

Yes, you’ll learn these things as a new associate, but I guarantee you will be more impressive and effective as an attorney if you already know them. There is a noticeable difference between the associates who have worked first and those who haven’t. Both groups admit to it, and obviously both groups contain successful and unsuccessful attorneys. I simply encourage most people to be part of the group who have some work experience under their belt before starting. I see very few negatives of a 21 or 22-year-old waiting a year or two to take on a large amount of debt to pursue a profession that they often haven’t directly worked in.

Obviously the decision to work before school should always be with the student. Peers, parents and (obviously) this article (as if it could) shouldn’t pressure you either way.


Good luck!!!
Last edited by Pearalegal on Tue Aug 10, 2010 3:02 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Deuce
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Re: Real World Virgins: An Argument for Work Experience

Postby Deuce » Tue Aug 10, 2010 2:26 am

Hm. Must be nice paying your bills/budgeting for the first time after college.

Pearalegal
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Re: Real World Virgins: An Argument for Work Experience

Postby Pearalegal » Tue Aug 10, 2010 2:35 am

Ildeuce wrote:Hm. Must be nice paying your bills/budgeting for the first time after college.


Haha, like I said, I was incredibly lucky. I guess I should have added that dealing with people who make snide comments about someone else's financial situation no matter how honest you are is to be expected as well. :wink:

In all seriousness, I've just seen a lot of people who go into law school without having that experience. Obviously you're not one of them, which can only be in your benefit. Anyways, thanks for reading!

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kazu
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Re: Real World Virgins: An Argument for Work Experience

Postby kazu » Tue Aug 10, 2010 3:12 am

Right now I'm working at my first "real" job and I agree so much with what you've said here :oops:

Thanks for the great article :)

Pearalegal
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Re: Real World Virgins: An Argument for Work Experience

Postby Pearalegal » Tue Aug 10, 2010 3:34 am

kazu wrote:Right now I'm working at my first "real" job and I agree so much with what you've said here :oops:

Thanks for the great article :)


Thanks!!

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TLS1776
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Re: Real World Virgins: An Argument for Work Experience

Postby TLS1776 » Thu Jan 13, 2011 1:13 am

Just wanted to stop in and say that I really liked this article.

random5483
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Re: Real World Virgins: An Argument for Work Experience

Postby random5483 » Thu Jan 13, 2011 3:06 am

I took a couple of years off to work. My work was not with a firm so my experience was not directly related; however, work killed the slacker in me. In undergrad I slacked off got horrid grades and only made it into a decent law school due to high LSAT scores. However, working for a couple of years improved my work ethic. Now, spending 40-60 hours a week on law school related work does not feel draining. If I had gone to law school straight out of undergrad I likely would not have had the fortitude to withstand the kind of work we need to do here.

Is work a must before law school? No. In fact if you have a strong work ethic I think going straight to law school is fine. The other points brought up in this article are relevant, but I do not believe they should be determinative. However, the biggest advantage by far of working is that you learn to manage your time and you get used to working many hours each day.

keg411
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Re: Real World Virgins: An Argument for Work Experience

Postby keg411 » Thu Jan 13, 2011 2:57 pm

Great article, Pearalegal. I convinced someone in a similar situation to the one you describe to take time off and work after undergrad, so it's great to see someone else write it out.

Also, apparently random and I are the same person :lol:.

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SMA22
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Re: Real World Virgins: An Argument for Work Experience

Postby SMA22 » Thu Jan 13, 2011 3:05 pm

Amen :D

random5483
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Re: Real World Virgins: An Argument for Work Experience

Postby random5483 » Thu Jan 13, 2011 11:25 pm

keg411 wrote:Great article, Pearalegal. I convinced someone in a similar situation to the one you describe to take time off and work after undergrad, so it's great to see someone else write it out.

Also, apparently random and I are the same person :lol:.



I doubt our situation is unique. We are not the majority, but I know a few others like me. People who well aced high school, nearly flunked out of college and then had a second coming of sorts :)

Our situations are similar though. Based on the 1L Grade thread it looks like we both aced our first semesters and are looking at transfering after our 1L years. So I guess you do make a valid point about!
Last edited by random5483 on Fri Jan 14, 2011 12:27 am, edited 1 time in total.

keg411
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Re: Real World Virgins: An Argument for Work Experience

Postby keg411 » Thu Jan 13, 2011 11:38 pm

random5483 wrote:
keg411 wrote:Great article, Pearalegal. I convinced someone in a similar situation to the one you describe to take time off and work after undergrad, so it's great to see someone else write it out.

Also, apparently random and I are the same person :lol:.



I doubt are situation is unique. We are not the majority, but I know a few others like me. People who well aced high school, nearly flunked out of college and then had a second coming of sorts :)

Are situations are similar though. Based on the 1L Grade thread it looks like we both aced our first semesters and are looking at transfering after our 1L years. So I guess you do make a valid point about!


Maybe we're different.. I had a crappy high school GPA :lol:.

random5483
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Re: Real World Virgins: An Argument for Work Experience

Postby random5483 » Fri Jan 14, 2011 12:27 am

keg411 wrote:
random5483 wrote:
keg411 wrote:Great article, Pearalegal. I convinced someone in a similar situation to the one you describe to take time off and work after undergrad, so it's great to see someone else write it out.

Also, apparently random and I are the same person :lol:.



I doubt are situation is unique. We are not the majority, but I know a few others like me. People who well aced high school, nearly flunked out of college and then had a second coming of sorts :)

Are situations are similar though. Based on the 1L Grade thread it looks like we both aced our first semesters and are looking at transfering after our 1L years. So I guess you do make a valid point about!


Maybe we're different.. I had a crappy high school GPA :lol:.






Wow, I must be a lot more tired than I feel. I used "Are" instead of "Our" twice! Not once, but twice!

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Tom Joad
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Re: Real World Virgins: An Argument for Work Experience

Postby Tom Joad » Sat Jul 23, 2011 4:04 am

I find this thread a little insulting as right now I am holding down 2 jobs for about 60 hours a week during the summer and during school I work about 30 hours a week. And that includes paying bills. It is likely that my cycle will suffer because I will be a K-JD, but I don't think it is fair.

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Re: Real World Virgins: An Argument for Work Experience

Postby Moultdog » Tue Dec 06, 2011 4:35 am

Tom Joad wrote:I find this thread a little insulting as right now I am holding down 2 jobs for about 60 hours a week during the summer and during school I work about 30 hours a week. And that includes paying bills. It is likely that my cycle will suffer because I will be a K-JD, but I don't think it is fair.


Sorry for your tough situation, but I don't know how you could be insulted by this article. It is a good idea to work before law school, and obviously you're doing that and doing a good job at it. Some of us did not have to pay our own bills through school, and I know that what work experience I'm getting during my year off before law school has been really helpful in figuring out the "real world". This is a great article for people like me.

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IAFG
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Re: Real World Virgins: An Argument for Work Experience

Postby IAFG » Tue Dec 06, 2011 4:50 am

Tom Joad wrote:I find this thread a little insulting as right now I am holding down 2 jobs for about 60 hours a week during the summer and during school I work about 30 hours a week. And that includes paying bills. It is likely that my cycle will suffer because I will be a K-JD, but I don't think it is fair.

Sorry bro but it is not the same.

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Neatrends
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Re: Real World Virgins: An Argument for Work Experience

Postby Neatrends » Tue Dec 06, 2011 5:17 am

Great post

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SemperLegal
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Re: Real World Virgins: An Argument for Work Experience

Postby SemperLegal » Tue Dec 06, 2011 7:15 am

I like this article a lot. I have been a full-time student, a full-time employee, and a mix of the two. If it is at all possible, everyone should get experience doing all three.

From being a full-time student I learned how to truly prioritize my time when given minimal constraints. I learned that just because I can go out every night and still pull a good grade, I shouldn't. I learned how to effectively study, rather than alternate between cramming and academic neglect. Finally, I learned how to have a good time, eat well, and survive with zero discretionary funds.

From being a full-time employee I learned how to survive with a large amount of non-discretionary expenses (rent, insurance, food), how to strike a balance between being economical and living in squalor, how to project an image you want, how to show up everyday on-time and with all deliverables, how to work in a team, how to meet friends (of both sexes) outside of a bar/classroom, how to stand up for myself, how to get totally reamed by a man (sorry, never worked for a woman) who could effectively destroy my life, and how to recover from said ass-chewing.

From being a double part-timer, I learned how to temper my behavior according to the situation, how to incorporate my formal education into my work, how to draw on real world experience in the classroom, how to balance various commitments, and exactly how much "me" time I need to avoid losing myself.

That being said, I cannot pick out who among my friends has never been a full-time student or a part-time student. The changes are mostly internal. I can, however, almost always figure out who has never worked a full-time, nonseasonal job. Sometimes the indicators are subtle, but among my large, public UG class the differences were drastic enough to elicit a fairly large, if irrational, rage.

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Re: Real World Virgins: An Argument for Work Experience

Postby 20130312 » Tue Dec 06, 2011 4:45 pm

IAFG wrote:
Tom Joad wrote:I find this thread a little insulting as right now I am holding down 2 jobs for about 60 hours a week during the summer and during school I work about 30 hours a week. And that includes paying bills. It is likely that my cycle will suffer because I will be a K-JD, but I don't think it is fair.

Sorry bro but it is not the same.


Credited.

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Tom Joad
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Re: Real World Virgins: An Argument for Work Experience

Postby Tom Joad » Tue Dec 06, 2011 9:28 pm

Moultdog wrote:
Tom Joad wrote:I find this thread a little insulting as right now I am holding down 2 jobs for about 60 hours a week during the summer and during school I work about 30 hours a week. And that includes paying bills. It is likely that my cycle will suffer because I will be a K-JD, but I don't think it is fair.


Sorry for your tough situation, but I don't know how you could be insulted by this article. It is a good idea to work before law school, and obviously you're doing that and doing a good job at it. Some of us did not have to pay our own bills through school, and I know that what work experience I'm getting during my year off before law school has been really helpful in figuring out the "real world". This is a great article for people like me.


lol I don't really look at it as a tough situation. I deeply enjoy it (most of the time). And where I go to school is is quite the norm. I just got a little pissy because the OP seemed to assume that all K-JDs were really real world virgins.

InGoodFaith wrote:
IAFG wrote:
Tom Joad wrote:I find this thread a little insulting as right now I am holding down 2 jobs for about 60 hours a week during the summer and during school I work about 30 hours a week. And that includes paying bills. It is likely that my cycle will suffer because I will be a K-JD, but I don't think it is fair.

Sorry bro but it is not the same.


Credited.


Ok, you're right, I'm wrong. Does that make you feel better?

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kerflux
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Re: Real World Virgins: An Argument for Work Experience

Postby kerflux » Tue Dec 13, 2011 7:28 pm

I don't understand why you're insulted by the article - it wasn't written with your situation in mind, nor did I detect any condescension. I understand a little lingering resentment aimed at those who had a full-ride on their parent's dime and never had to balance rent/studying, but ultimately I think you can still glean something from this. There is a clearly demarcated difference between working during school and just working, particularly if the job is anything like the brain-atrophying rot that's (if they're fortunate) available for freshly minted college grads.

Since I've taken a year off after graduating, I can say that THIS is probably the hardest lesson to learn.

1) Because you’ll hopefully learn that as a new college graduate, you aren’t entitled to anything.

Jesus. Christ. I can give a thousand examples of the axiomatic truth of this statement.

OP, thanks for a great read.

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IAFG
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Re: Real World Virgins: An Argument for Work Experience

Postby IAFG » Tue Dec 13, 2011 11:29 pm

kerflux wrote:There is a clearly demarcated difference between working during school and just working, particularly if the job is anything like the brain-atrophying rot that's (if they're fortunate) available for freshly minted college grads.

Since I've taken a year off after graduating, I can say that THIS is probably the hardest lesson to learn.

This is totally true, but also a terrible sales pitch to try to talk people into delaying to work.

Me: you should take time off before law school and get a real job.
0L: But the job market sucks and I can get in this cycle instead.
Me: No really, it's important for you to fully understand how terrible the real world is, how miserable and hopeless it really is.
0L: Sounds pretty sweet but I think I'll skip it.

But the thing is, not understanding that it's work that sucks will lead many of them to believe that it's law that sucks, and be miserable lawyers instead of just miserable people.

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cinephile
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Re: Real World Virgins: An Argument for Work Experience

Postby cinephile » Tue Dec 13, 2011 11:48 pm

IAFG wrote:

But the thing is, not understanding that it's work that sucks will lead many of them to believe that it's law that sucks, and be miserable lawyers instead of just miserable people.


I agree completely, but one of my professors had an end-of-the-semester speech telling us if we weren't passionate about reading cases now, we'd be bored as lawyers and should get out while we still can. And I wanted to say to him, Have you looked at other jobs, because they're all pretty boring. If I'm going to be bored, at least I hope to be bored with more earning potential.

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Re: Real World Virgins: An Argument for Work Experience

Postby IAFG » Tue Dec 13, 2011 11:54 pm

cinephile wrote:
IAFG wrote:

But the thing is, not understanding that it's work that sucks will lead many of them to believe that it's law that sucks, and be miserable lawyers instead of just miserable people.


I agree completely, but one of my professors had an end-of-the-semester speech telling us if we weren't passionate about reading cases now, we'd be bored as lawyers and should get out while we still can. And I wanted to say to him, Have you looked at other jobs, because they're all pretty boring. If I'm going to be bored, at least I hope to be bored with more earning potential.

Did your prof ever have a job outside of law?

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Re: Real World Virgins: An Argument for Work Experience

Postby cinephile » Tue Dec 13, 2011 11:58 pm

IAFG wrote:Did your prof ever have a job outside of law?


Who knows. But he never worked as a lawyer or took the bar, he just became a professor immediately after clerking.

It's funny because every time we get these speeches everyone semi-seriously discusses dropping out. But only one girl has.

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Re: Real World Virgins: An Argument for Work Experience

Postby IAFG » Wed Dec 14, 2011 12:03 am

cinephile wrote:
IAFG wrote:Did your prof ever have a job outside of law?


Who knows. But he never worked as a lawyer or took the bar, he just became a professor immediately after clerking.

It's funny because every time we get these speeches everyone semi-seriously discusses dropping out. But only one girl has.

Wow if he was a K-JD he's like a mega K-JD now.




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