Berkeley Class of 2012

(housing, friendships, future exams, all things 2012)
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druvill
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Re: Berkeley Class of 2012

Postby druvill » Sat Jun 13, 2009 7:36 pm


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Rotor
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Re: Berkeley Class of 2012

Postby Rotor » Sat Jun 13, 2009 7:51 pm

druvill wrote:http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=57447236555

all right thanks.

Glad you found it.

And I don't know what that thing is, but it looks a hella better than that old bulldog. :-)

roguebear
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Re: Berkeley Class of 2012

Postby roguebear » Sun Jun 14, 2009 5:47 am

That thing is Oski, the mascot for cal, ever present pacing the sidelines of cal sports games.

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Rotor
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Re: Berkeley Class of 2012

Postby Rotor » Sun Jun 14, 2009 10:59 am

roguebear wrote:That thing is Oski, the mascot for cal, ever present pacing the sidelines of cal sports games.

That's kinda what I figured, but it looks more like a Harp Seal with Elvis Presley hair than a fearsome Ursus arctos californicus.

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TopCat
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Re: Berkeley Class of 2012

Postby TopCat » Mon Jun 15, 2009 5:05 pm

Since my earlier question (re: award letters) went unanswered, let me ask another:

Why can't we committed 0L's access the restricted content in the CDO website? I emailed the CDO as well as the admissions office and it's been about a week and they haven't replied. I was wondering whether we can only access it after November 1st? Does anyone have any clue? A number of other schools that I got into allowed access to OCI data and stuff so I don't know what's up with Berkeley.

This is the website I am talking about:

http://www.law.berkeley.edu/2234.htm

madison12991
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Re: Berkeley Class of 2012

Postby madison12991 » Mon Jun 15, 2009 5:19 pm

TopCat wrote:Did we get official award letters in the mail? As in, award letters on official Berkeley Law letterhead? I don't think they sent out letters, right? I remember just getting the email. Could anyone verify this? Thanks. And is the Offer Letter section on BearFacts supposed to have award letters for grants? I still can't access my award letter on BearFacts, just the award summary page [it still says "Sorry, there are no Official or Preliminary Awards to view at this time"]. Berkeley Intl Office wants award letters printed on letterhead stationery, among a number of things they want.

The Cal woods are lovely, dark, and deep
But I have forms to fill out and keep
and hoops to jump through before I sleep
and hoops to jump through before I sleep


We didn't get paper copies of the award letters, just the online version.

I don't know about grants because I didn't get one. Do you know that you did?

The "Financial Aid Award Summary" page should have your federal loans listed if you applied for them. If yours still says "Sorry, there are no Official or Preliminary Awards to view at this time" I think you're going to want to look into that.

I don't know about the access to the CDO info.

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TopCat
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Re: Berkeley Class of 2012

Postby TopCat » Mon Jun 15, 2009 5:27 pm

Thanks, madison12991.

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Rotor
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Re: Berkeley Class of 2012

Postby Rotor » Mon Jun 15, 2009 10:24 pm

Holy moly....what an ugly situation.

Still elated I got accepted. Still happy with my choice. But boy-o-boy...

Robert J. Birgeneau, Chancellor wrote:Dear Campus Colleagues:

As you are undoubtedly aware, California's financial crisis has worsened severely in recent weeks; this means that the likelihood of unprecedented cuts in State funding of the University has risen dramatically. UC Berkeley is facing the most difficult financial situation that we have ever encountered in our university careers.

We know that you have been hearing rumors about a number of potential actions designed to reduce costs not only at Berkeley but across the system. We want to lay out the financial context for you, tell you what we think may happen, and let you know our leadership strategy for the Berkeley campus as we manage through these difficult times.

Today, we find ourselves facing stark new realities.

Six weeks ago, UC Berkeley faced a $67.2 million budget gap for 2009-10. That anticipated shortfall has now grown to $145 million. Here is how we have been working to address the anticipated shortfall.

* The recently-enacted 9.3% student fee increases and other revenue-enhancement measures that become effective July 1, have reduced the $145 million gap by $30 million.

* In addition, through the work of many of you, our cost-saving measures introduced in 2008-2009 have further reduced the gap by another $15 million.

* That leaves us, at present, with a $100 million remaining gap for the academic year 2009-2010. We are hopeful that this gap will not grow further as the State finalizes its budget, but we must assume that this is our working target as we plan for the coming year.

* The possible loss of the Cal Grants program, as proposed by the Governor, is not included in the above totals. These grants total $47 million annually to the UC Berkeley campus. They cover fees for a large number of our undergraduates. The loss of Cal Grants would not only disadvantage those students; it would fundamentally subvert our social imperative to provide broad social access to the excellence at UC Berkeley. The Joint Legislative Budget Conference Committee has proposed protecting student awards for 2009-2010 grants, but that is not 100 percent certain.

* Federal stimulus funds are beginning to trickle in, but are not designed to cover existing core operations.

UC Berkeley, of course, is not alone in facing these challenges. Private universities have suffered major declines in their endowments while public universities nationwide have experienced severe cuts in State support.

This basically means that we are now facing a reduction of our baseline budget that will likely continue, and may even deepen, over multiple years. These unprecedented developments require us to examine the underlying assumptions that guide us in delivering and supporting the University's mission of teaching and learning, research and scholarship, and public service.

For UC Berkeley, this much is certain: all of us---students, faculty, staff, and senior administrators---will be required to sacrifice as we navigate our way through this crisis. At the same time, it is essential that we work together to address the formidable challenges ahead of us.

Our budget planning scenarios, which had earlier anticipated an average of 8% permanent budget cuts to all campus units for the coming fiscal year, will now likely be at a campus-wide average of 20%. While some units will need to spread the cuts over two years, the campus average cut must be at least 12% in 2009-2010. The remainder must be taken by 2010-2011.

These cuts will not be uniform "across-the-board"; units that are core to the teaching and research missions will be given somewhat lesser cuts than the others, and, within the teaching-and-research realms, units with higher capacity will be asked to take larger cuts than those with lower capacity. This is the only rational approach in a campus like ours if we are to preserve our depth and breadth of academic excellence---our principal competitive advantage.

Clearly cuts of this magnitude will require all areas of our campus to sacrifice considerably, and to make changes in their core operations. We will need to reduce our workforce significantly and this will be painful and difficult. To accomplish this, we will also need to make changes to our core operations and the way we do our work. All of these efforts will take time to achieve.

Over the summer, managers will work with their units to make difficult but necessary decisions about reductions in our workforce, while determining which services we can eliminate or curtail. Naturally, all policies and procedures will be followed, and we will work to treat our people with the respect and dignity they deserve under these very difficult circumstances. We are sensitive to the impact of staffing reductions on the workload of remaining staff and are seeking ways to streamline our business processes.

As each unit or department works to meet our new budget number, many specifics remain unclear, requiring approval by the Office of the President and the Regents for system-wide implementation. We would like to inform you of those things that are likely or certain to occur in 2009-2010.

What We Know for Sure

* It is, unfortunately, certain that, during 2009-2010, efforts to implement permanent budget cuts at all UC campuses will result in the elimination of many staff positions.

* It is certain that, during 2009-2010, there will be a near-total freeze in new faculty hiring at UC Berkeley.

* It is certain that, during 2009-2010, a staff hiring freeze at UC Berkeley will remain in effect.

* It is also certain that there will be no faculty or staff early-retirement programs at UC campuses on the order of the VERIP of the 1990s.

What is Likely to Happen

* It is highly likely that, through temporary furloughs and/or pay cuts, faculty, staff, and senior administrators at all UC campuses will see their wages reduced by about 8 percent (with potentially a lower rate for our lowest paid workers); it remains uncertain whether pension calculations will be affected by this reduction.

* It is highly likely that, at some point during the 2009-2010 academic year, faculty, staff, and senior administrators at all UC campuses will begin contributing to the UC pension fund.

* It is quite possible that the health-care premiums paid by faculty, staff, and senior administrators at all UC campuses will increase significantly.


Our first and foremost goal is to preserve the academic excellence of Berkeley. To that end, let us be clear as to what we will not entertain during this crisis.

* We are not discussing or considering layoffs of Senate faculty members, tenured or untenured.

* We are not discussing or considering making Senate faculty promotion decisions contingent on available funding.

* We will not sacrifice Berkeley's commitment to breadth and depth of academic excellence.

* We will not allow the budgetary crisis to subvert either the delivery of our teaching mission or the support infrastructure for research.

* We will not sacrifice our commitment to social access: low-income students who have earned a place at Berkeley must be capable of affording a UC Berkeley education.

* We will not flag in our commitment to recruit to Berkeley the best graduate students in all fields.

* We will not abandon our efforts to train and promote a highly skilled and diverse workforce.

These are the guiding principles that will be in the forefront of our activities as we entertain difficult choices.

As we progress through this budgetary crisis, we are also looking forward to the longer term prospects and we are taking measures to reduce the size and cost of our enterprise by streamlining work. For example, we have begun implementing a multi-year plan to streamline administrative processes in IT, Human Resources, procurement, business services, student advising, research administration, and other areas. Many of these improvements will involve centralized and automated systems that will reduce our dependence on a patchwork of decentralized, labor-intensive operations.

Over time, a combination of layoffs, retirements and normal attrition will result in a smaller workforce that will bring our staff and faculty payroll closer to alignment with State funding, while maintaining high-quality services. Toward these ends, we have already made substantial investments in systems such as the Human Capital Management (HCM) systems, the Berkeley Financial System (BFS), and an upgrade to ePro, our procurement system.

We are also working with the Office of the President on ways to cut costs by adopting system-wide (UC) administrative systems and reducing prices through system-wide procurement of some goods and services. Locally, we are consolidating the administration of contracts and grants and are merging back-office functions of both academic and non-academic units.

We are actively engaged and working closely with the Academic Senate and a faculty subgroup that has been formed specifically to examine budget reduction measures. We anticipate evaluating all options around hiring, retention practices, and strategies to defend the breadth and depth of academic excellence for which UC Berkeley is renowned.

We are implementing an entire suite of revenue-enhancement measures: full recovery of the central administrative costs associated with our self-sufficient auxiliary enterprises; negotiation of a higher federal overhead rate for campus research; expansion of the reach and earnings potential of University Extension and Summer Sessions; and, of course, intensified private fund-raising. We are also restructuring campus debt to reduce those costs over the near term.

In the external realm, University leaders are advocating aggressively, making sure that legislators, the public, and UC's closest constituents understand the value of our mission, employees, and students.

We pledge to redouble our efforts to strengthen UC Berkeley's long and rich tradition of combining access and excellence. Throughout the State, country, and even the world, Berkeley remains the standard by which all other universities are judged when it comes to the combination of comprehensive academic excellence and deep commitment to a public mission. We will not shy away from our commitment to either of these lofty goals.

Through shared sacrifice by students, staff, faculty, and senior administrators, and through renewed efforts to reduce over time the cost of delivering instruction, research, and administrative services on campus, we will emerge from this crisis more focused and more efficient, but equally excellent and accessible. UC Berkeley has been an outstanding institution for 141 years and it will still be outstanding 141 years from now. We look forward to working with you toward these ends.

What happens next?

We are acutely aware that the economic situation makes this a difficult time, professionally and personally, for many of you. Change of this magnitude will be difficult. We have asked our Human Resources area to assist in a number of ways, specifically by supporting managers and employees as we work through this difficult time. We understand that clear information on campus actions and resources to help you is essential. We ask that managers and supervisors please take time to go though this message with your employees. We renew our commitment to bring you that information as we learn it, via e-mails and on our Budget Central website: newscenter.berkeley.edu/budget. We hope that you will watch the site for budget news as it develops, and we thank you for your continued commitment and dedication to this unique institution.

Yours sincerely,


Robert J. Birgeneau
Chancellor

George W. Breslauer
Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost

Note: We ask supervisors to please print and deliver this message to staff who do not use computers in their work.

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TopCat
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Re: Berkeley Class of 2012

Postby TopCat » Mon Jun 15, 2009 11:17 pm

Holy moly indeed! I wonder how this will impact Boalt Hall...

CredoUtIntellegam
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Re: Berkeley Class of 2012

Postby CredoUtIntellegam » Mon Jun 15, 2009 11:36 pm

Holy Shit!!! I might have to withdraw!

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unionorganizer02
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Re: Berkeley Class of 2012

Postby unionorganizer02 » Tue Jun 16, 2009 2:07 am

what the heck??!! i just don't understand how our government can just throw millions of dollars at the wall street banks that caused this financial crisis, while letting our public schools suffer. it's completely ridiculous.

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rolark
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Re: Berkeley Class of 2012

Postby rolark » Tue Jun 16, 2009 5:41 am

Sorry to cut into your discussion here as a waitlisted student, but this is rather frightening.

Was that message available to all Berkeley students-or, Rotor, where did you find it?

Does anyone know how separate Boalt's finances are from Berkeley as a parent institution? Since the professional schools often operate separately, this might not affect them as much.

If anyone gets any more information about Boalt's financial situation or, even better, contacts the law school directly to ask about this and its impact, it would be great if you could share . . .

cornellbeez
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Re: Berkeley Class of 2012

Postby cornellbeez » Tue Jun 16, 2009 11:45 am

rolark wrote:Does anyone know how separate Boalt's finances are from Berkeley as a parent institution? Since the professional schools often operate separately, this might not affect them as much.


Boalt receives 30% of its funding from the parent institution. They're raising the tuition partly to reduce the percentage.

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Rotor
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Re: Berkeley Class of 2012

Postby Rotor » Tue Jun 16, 2009 12:44 pm

rolark wrote:Sorry to cut into your discussion here as a waitlisted student, but this is rather frightening.

Was that message available to all Berkeley students-or, Rotor, where did you find it?

Does anyone know how separate Boalt's finances are from Berkeley as a parent institution? Since the professional schools often operate separately, this might not affect them as much.

If anyone gets any more information about Boalt's financial situation or, even better, contacts the law school directly to ask about this and its impact, it would be great if you could share . . .


A couple of points to make here. A while after posting, I regretted just putting it up there without some of the context that others have now posted. (It was a mass email to my @berkeley.edu address. Did everyone not get the same thing??)

Like others have said, Boalt's reliance upon the corporate UC governance isn't huge and was already planned on getting smaller. It just may have to get smaller faster. I'm hopeful that the administration understands that they're already pushing private school sized debt and will look to cut expenses where they can and raise revenue in total and not in a per student basis (e.g., relaxing their faculty to student ratio goals and increasing class size a bit-- maybe good news for the waitlisters???).

Dean Edley's a smart guy and I would expect he has anticipated the anxiety that the Chancellor's email will be causing. My guess is he's addressing it with faculty/staff first-- as their immediate livelihoods are at risk. Hopefully, we students will hear from him soon.

iamlife1001
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Re: Berkeley Class of 2012

Postby iamlife1001 » Tue Jun 16, 2009 1:09 pm

to all NYers, (north easterners?); WTF is going on with this weather-- where is our summer!

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Rotor
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Re: Berkeley Class of 2012

Postby Rotor » Tue Jun 16, 2009 1:30 pm

unionorganizer02 wrote:what the heck??!! i just don't understand how our government can just throw millions of dollars at the wall street banks that caused this financial crisis, while letting our public schools suffer. it's completely ridiculous.

The government that threw billions of dollars to unlock the credit market (Fed) is not the same government that is now having to cut the UC budget (State).

California is highly commendable for its attempts to take care of its population, but the programs take money. Lots and lots of money. As wonderful as Prop 13 was for fiscal stability and economic growth & prosperity in the state in the 80s and into the 90s, its limits on property taxes (both in rate and upward assessments) and requiring a 2/3 supermajority to pass any other tax increases has severly limited the ability to pay for those programs. The legislature could continue to be generous while the economy continued to grow, but that only pushed the bill to be paid down the road-- now that the economy isn't growing, neither are revenues and the bill has to be paid.

While it's not an ideal analogy, the state is doing what we all do on a monthly basis. We go out and make money so that we can pay the bills we need to pay. If we don't make enough money to do what we want to do, we either cut back on other expenses or go out and get a second job. The flagging economy and Prop 13 are keeping the state from "getting the second job" so cuts have to be made. It's not like the UCs are the only ones taking the cuts. It's pretty much across the board from what I understand-- think about that every time you drive over the Bay Bridge.

Oh...and how would you like to be committed to UCH, who last I heard had a 100% cut in its state funding. I can't imagine that will survive lobbying in Sacramento, but wow.

Unionorganizer: note, I'm not trying to pick a fight by changing the terms from bank bailout to unlocking the credit market, but I think it important to remember WHY we did what we did. Hoover refused to do so back in the 20s and we see where that got us. The banks certainly were culpable. But so were the companies who rated bonds, and the legislature for deregulating banks while reducing oversight to the point of ineffectiveness, and the people who signed promisory notes that they had no business signing (regardless of whether they were manipulated or underinformed: caveat emptor).
Last edited by Rotor on Tue Jun 16, 2009 1:33 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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unionorganizer02
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Re: Berkeley Class of 2012

Postby unionorganizer02 » Tue Jun 16, 2009 1:32 pm

I also got the email on my berkeley.edu address. and i concur with rotor that edley is a smart guy who can raise money. that was one of the reasons he couldn't address us during the welcoming on admitted students day. he was out doing trying to get us more resources. i also think its his leadership that helped boalt move up in the rankings.

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druvill
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Re: Berkeley Class of 2012

Postby druvill » Tue Jun 16, 2009 1:33 pm

it's cold as hell over here. i took two trips this summer- to the philippines and costa rica, and each time i got back i couldn't believe how cold new york was.

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Rotor
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Re: Berkeley Class of 2012

Postby Rotor » Tue Jun 16, 2009 1:36 pm

unionorganizer02 wrote: i also think its his leadership that helped boalt move up in the rankings.

+1 (unequivocally) :wink:

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TopCat
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Re: Berkeley Class of 2012

Postby TopCat » Tue Jun 16, 2009 1:40 pm

I think rotor has a point. I also expect an email from the Berkeley Law admins in the near future. But I'm stone cold sober and stone cold sweat is running down the back of my neck thinking about all this.

rolark, you're welcome here anytime. I also got the message at my @berkeley address so I think it was sent to all affiliated with Berkeley.

iamlife1001 wrote:to all NYers, (north easterners?); WTF is going on with this weather-- where is our summer!


Yeah, wtf is going on? This is lousy. A day or two I could stand and probably like even. But this is looking like it's going to linger a while. I want my summer. I want sweat. I want the festering NY sewer smell. I want to go to Coney Island in my shorts. Damn it.

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unionorganizer02
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Re: Berkeley Class of 2012

Postby unionorganizer02 » Tue Jun 16, 2009 1:55 pm

Rotor wrote:
unionorganizer02 wrote:what the heck??!! i just don't understand how our government can just throw millions of dollars at the wall street banks that caused this financial crisis, while letting our public schools suffer. it's completely ridiculous.

The government that threw billions of dollars to unlock the credit market (Fed) is not the same government that is now having to cut the UC budget (State).

California is highly commendable for its attempts to take care of its population, but the programs take money. Lots and lots of money. As wonderful as Prop 13 was for fiscal stability and economic growth & prosperity in the state in the 80s and into the 90s, its limits on property taxes (both in rate and upward assessments) and requiring a 2/3 supermajority to pass any other tax increases has severly limited the ability to pay for those programs. The legislature could continue to be generous while the economy continued to grow, but that only pushed the bill to be paid down the road-- now that the economy isn't growing, neither are revenues and the bill has to be paid.

While it's not an ideal analogy, the state is doing what we all do on a monthly basis. We go out and make money so that we can pay the bills we need to pay. If we don't make enough money to do what we want to do, we either cut back on other expenses or go out and get a second job. The flagging economy and Prop 13 are keeping the state from "getting the second job" so cuts have to be made. It's not like the UCs are the only ones taking the cuts. It's pretty much across the board from what I understand-- think about that every time you drive over the Bay Bridge.

Oh...and how would you like to be committed to UCH, who last I heard had a 100% cut in its state funding. I can't imagine that will survive lobbying in Sacramento, but wow.

Unionorganizer: note, I'm not trying to pick a fight by changing the terms from bank bailout to unlocking the credit market, but I think it important to remember WHY we did what we did. Hoover refused to do so back in the 20s and we see where that got us. The banks certainly were culpable. But so were the companies who rated bonds, and the legislature for deregulating banks while reducing oversight to the point of ineffectiveness, and the people who signed promisory notes that they had no business signing (regardless of whether they were manipulated or underinformed: caveat emptor).


no worries. i understand that there are two different entities involved here. i was just lamenting the fact that our state and federal governments in these tough times seem to cater to the rich. the first programs cut in california are those that serve working families and our schools (my brother is among the many teachers getting laid off in LAUSD - this will lead to larger class sizes and schools in poor communities will suffer the most, not those in beverly hills). i agree that inaction on the part of the obama administration is bad. but throwing money at the banks with absolutely no accountability is not helping working people. unfortunately, politicians are unwilling to fight wall street. just look last month when the senate tried to pass a bill that would give bankruptcy judges the ability to adjust mortgages to help homeowners avoid foreclosure. the banks spent millions campaigning against this and they won. senator durbin who sponsored it quipped, "And the banks - hard to believe in a time when we're facing a banking crisis that many of the banks created - are still the most powerful lobby on Capitol Hill. And they frankly own the place." and it was these same banks that successfully pushed the Clinton administration to repeal the glass-steagal act, which led to the massive deregulation you just talked about that killed the oversight measures FDR put in place to keep these wealthy institutions in check. oh and i agree with you on prop 13. California's financial trouble will likely lead to higher tuition fees for UC students (something that didn't exist until Reagan became governor) and further cuts in financial aid programs.

CredoUtIntellegam
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Re: Berkeley Class of 2012

Postby CredoUtIntellegam » Tue Jun 16, 2009 2:05 pm

One of the benefits of going to Berkeley in the past was its relatively low tuition compared to private schools, but with the exponential rise of tuition within the last decade and a half, those savings have evaporated. Berkeley is a great school, don't get me wrong, but the prospect of coming out of there $150,000 or more in debt, compounded by interest rates on longer term loans, is terrifying. :shock:

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IzziesGal
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Re: Berkeley Class of 2012

Postby IzziesGal » Tue Jun 16, 2009 3:01 pm

CredoUtIntellegam wrote:One of the benefits of going to Berkeley in the past was its relatively low tuition compared to private schools, but with the exponential rise of tuition within the last decade and a half, those savings have evaporated. Berkeley is a great school, don't get me wrong, but the prospect of coming out of there $150,000 or more in debt, compounded by interest rates on longer term loans, is terrifying. :shock:


I have to agree. It's a great school and definitely worth the investment, but one of the selling points for me was in-state tuition in my second year. Now, the total COA is on par with Stanford (roughly).

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TheNerdProject
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Re: Berkeley Class of 2012

Postby TheNerdProject » Tue Jun 16, 2009 3:12 pm

Did anyone get an e-mail today about their financial aid packages having been "revised"? According to Bearfacts my subsidized loans are now gone! I tried calling FA but they're out until 4PM EST. I'm hoping this is some silly mistake that can easily be fixed.

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IzziesGal
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Re: Berkeley Class of 2012

Postby IzziesGal » Tue Jun 16, 2009 3:37 pm

TheNerdProject wrote:Did anyone get an e-mail today about their financial aid packages having been "revised"? According to Bearfacts my subsidized loans are now gone! I tried calling FA but they're out until 4PM EST. I'm hoping this is some silly mistake that can easily be fixed.


No, but now I'm sufficiently panicked. Did you see the loss on your award letter itself, or on the award summary screen?




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