The Ideal Law School Laptop

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superflush
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Re: The Ideal Law School Laptop

Postby superflush » Thu Jun 11, 2009 1:43 am

dbt wrote:Me too! Which brings me another problem: when I've tried to go through the motions of purchasing a Macbook on Apple's Education website, it doesn't allow me to change the color from white. At least with the Macbook Pro it automatically comes in a nice silver with some black bordering the screen.


Well, as of right now, the only MacBook is the white one. And the 13'' models have become part of the MacBook Pro line, giving a much larger MBP line.

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vut
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Re: The Ideal Law School Laptop

Postby vut » Thu Jun 11, 2009 2:28 am

sheltron5000 wrote:I guess the only question i have left is about using two VERY different keyboards. Is there anyone here who does this? Do you think It hurts your typing speed?


I own both a Mac and PC. The keyboard layouts are very similar, except for a few function keys. As for typing, if you don't deviate outside of the normal typing habits, there is virtually no difference. This is because both PCs and Macs use the standard QWERTY layout. For me, unless I'm doing admin work, it does not slow me down.

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sheltron5000
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Re: The Ideal Law School Laptop

Postby sheltron5000 » Thu Jun 11, 2009 2:41 am

vut wrote:
sheltron5000 wrote:I guess the only question i have left is about using two VERY different keyboards. Is there anyone here who does this? Do you think It hurts your typing speed?


I own both a Mac and PC. The keyboard layouts are very similar, except for a few function keys. As for typing, if you don't deviate outside of the normal typing habits, there is virtually no difference. This is because both PCs and Macs use the standard QWERTY layout. For me, unless I'm doing admin work, it does not slow me down.


I guess my typing must be ideosynchratic because in my experience switching keyboards has always made it impossible for me to type with any speed.

but you also kind of answered my question. I've never had two different keyboards at the same time, so maybe people just get used to it?

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vut
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Re: The Ideal Law School Laptop

Postby vut » Thu Jun 11, 2009 2:49 am

sheltron5000 wrote:I guess my typing must be ideosynchratic because in my experience switching keyboards has always made it impossible for me to type with any speed.

but you also kind of answered my question. I've never had two different keyboards at the same time, so maybe people just get used to it?


It could also be the different subtle spacing between the different keyboards that throws you off. I guess you just have to train yourself to familiarize if you want to use both PC and Mac. Good thing you have at least 6 months until the exams.

On a similar note, I am learning how to use the Trackpoint on the T400. It's tough to move away from the touchpad, but navigation feels much better when I can do it.

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sheltron5000
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Re: The Ideal Law School Laptop

Postby sheltron5000 » Thu Jun 11, 2009 2:55 am

vut wrote:
sheltron5000 wrote:I guess my typing must be ideosynchratic because in my experience switching keyboards has always made it impossible for me to type with any speed.

but you also kind of answered my question. I've never had two different keyboards at the same time, so maybe people just get used to it?


It could also be the different subtle spacing between the different keyboards that throws you off. I guess you just have to train yourself to familiarize if you want to use both PC and Mac. Good thing you have at least 6 months until the exams.

On a similar note, I am learning how to use the Trackpoint on the T400. It's tough to move away from the touchpad, but navigation feels much better when I can do it.


can you describe better? I've always wondered why lenovo even kept them.

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Metternich
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Re: The Ideal Law School Laptop

Postby Metternich » Thu Jun 11, 2009 3:02 am

Do you guys think that the X300/X301 is worth $600 or so more dollars than the T400, similarly equipped? (Some of the fantastic promotions which other posters have referenced have made both models surpisingly affordable.) I hate computers and will only be using one because, even I'll admit, they are all but essential to success in law school. That said, part of the reason I hate them is because I've had such bad luck with mediocre systems in the past. Within reason, I want to buy a proven, reliable, portable computer that will endure three or more years of hard use and stave off obsolescence for as long as possible. In the case of the above models, is the extra money worth spending?

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sheltron5000
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Re: The Ideal Law School Laptop

Postby sheltron5000 » Thu Jun 11, 2009 3:10 am

Metternich wrote:Do you guys think that the X300/X301 is worth $600 or so more dollars than the T400, similarly equipped? (Some of the fantastic promotions which other posters have referenced have made both models surpisingly affordable.) I hate computers and will only be using one because, even I'll admit, they are all but essential to success in law school. That said, part of the reason I hate them is because I've had such bad luck with mediocre systems in the past. Within reason, I want to buy a proven, reliable, portable computer that will endure three or more years of hard use and stave off obsolescence for as long as possible. In the case of the above models, is the extra money worth spending?


You, sir, have just described a mac :lol:

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Metternich
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Re: The Ideal Law School Laptop

Postby Metternich » Thu Jun 11, 2009 3:15 am

sheltron5000 wrote:
Metternich wrote:Do you guys think that the X300/X301 is worth $600 or so more dollars than the T400, similarly equipped? (Some of the fantastic promotions which other posters have referenced have made both models surpisingly affordable.) I hate computers and will only be using one because, even I'll admit, they are all but essential to success in law school. That said, part of the reason I hate them is because I've had such bad luck with mediocre systems in the past. Within reason, I want to buy a proven, reliable, portable computer that will endure three or more years of hard use and stave off obsolescence for as long as possible. In the case of the above models, is the extra money worth spending?


You, sir, have just described a mac :lol:


:lol: Perhaps, but I'm not looking to migrate over to a new operating system and am pretty much sold on Lenovo. I'm thinking the extra money for the X301 may be worth it, if, for no other reasons than it is 2lbs lighter, has a (theoretically) more reliable hard drive, and seems to be of marginally better build quality. All are obvious plusses here.

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vut
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Re: The Ideal Law School Laptop

Postby vut » Thu Jun 11, 2009 4:00 am

sheltron5000 wrote:
vut wrote:
sheltron5000 wrote:I guess my typing must be ideosynchratic because in my experience switching keyboards has always made it impossible for me to type with any speed.

but you also kind of answered my question. I've never had two different keyboards at the same time, so maybe people just get used to it?


It could also be the different subtle spacing between the different keyboards that throws you off. I guess you just have to train yourself to familiarize if you want to use both PC and Mac. Good thing you have at least 6 months until the exams.

On a similar note, I am learning how to use the Trackpoint on the T400. It's tough to move away from the touchpad, but navigation feels much better when I can do it.


can you describe better? I've always wondered why lenovo even kept them.


The Trackpoint was developed by IBM (Thinkpad's original creator) in the 1980s to facilitate a tighter integration between the keyboard and the mouse, in order to minimize the amount time spent moving between the the two devices. Its introduction proved to be popular among touch-typists and computer geeks because the Trackpoint does not require the user to move their hands away from the keyboard. Even NASA chooses to bring Thinkpad computers with these Trackpoints up to space with them.

On the other hand, the touchpad is extremely intuitive and does not have a learning curve like the Trackpoint. This is partly the reason why laptops are predominately built with the touchpad instead.

To make the story short, if you can learn how to use the Trackpoint, your hands won't ever leave the keyboard. This is a big plus if you're a decent typist. If not, you can always use the included trackpad.

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hoffb86
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Re: The Ideal Law School Laptop

Postby hoffb86 » Thu Jun 11, 2009 9:25 am

I've had two lenovo's and love the trackpoint (despite leaning towards switching to mac for law school).

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2bullyboys
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Re: The Ideal Law School Laptop

Postby 2bullyboys » Thu Jun 11, 2009 11:46 am

anyone planning on purchasing/using note-taking software? if so, which one?

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sheltron5000
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Re: The Ideal Law School Laptop

Postby sheltron5000 » Thu Jun 11, 2009 12:10 pm

onenote.

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dbt
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Re: The Ideal Law School Laptop

Postby dbt » Thu Jun 11, 2009 12:38 pm

For the Mac, is the solid state drive a much better option than the standard drive that comes with the Pro? I'm looking at hard drive options and I could upgrade to the 500 GB standard hard drive for the same price that I could pay to upgrade to the 128 GB solid state drive. The next size up (256 GB solid state) is $700 more! I've got an external hard drive already (500 GB) so I don't need memory that badly, but I would only really lean toward the smaller solid state hard drive (not paying $700 more) if it's really that much better than the standard hard drive.

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Rsrcht
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Re: The Ideal Law School Laptop

Postby Rsrcht » Thu Jun 11, 2009 12:43 pm


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djshack
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Re: The Ideal Law School Laptop

Postby djshack » Thu Jun 11, 2009 12:49 pm

hoffb86 wrote:I've had two lenovo's and love the trackpoint (despite leaning towards switching to mac for law school).

I replaced my MacBook with a Lenovo T400 about two months ago. I thought I'd never use the TrackPoint, but it quickly became all I use, and now I never really use the TrackPad. I don't really know how to explain the difference, other than the TrackPoint just seems much more efficient when you get the hang of it.

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dbt
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Re: The Ideal Law School Laptop

Postby dbt » Thu Jun 11, 2009 1:26 pm



Thanks! I think I'll go with the SSD then.

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vut
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Re: The Ideal Law School Laptop

Postby vut » Thu Jun 11, 2009 1:35 pm

djshack wrote:
hoffb86 wrote:I've had two lenovo's and love the trackpoint (despite leaning towards switching to mac for law school).

I replaced my MacBook with a Lenovo T400 about two months ago. I thought I'd never use the TrackPoint, but it quickly became all I use, and now I never really use the TrackPad. I don't really know how to explain the difference, other than the TrackPoint just seems much more efficient when you get the hang of it.


I agree. It is difficult to explain why the Trackpoint is more efficient, only that it works. The only thing is that it has a slight learning curve. Unless I plug in a USB mouse, I'm usually lazy enough to stay with the Trackpoint, leaving the Touchpad untouched.

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vut
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Re: The Ideal Law School Laptop

Postby vut » Thu Jun 11, 2009 1:57 pm

sheltron5000 wrote:
Metternich wrote:Do you guys think that the X300/X301 is worth $600 or so more dollars than the T400, similarly equipped? (Some of the fantastic promotions which other posters have referenced have made both models surpisingly affordable.) I hate computers and will only be using one because, even I'll admit, they are all but essential to success in law school. That said, part of the reason I hate them is because I've had such bad luck with mediocre systems in the past. Within reason, I want to buy a proven, reliable, portable computer that will endure three or more years of hard use and stave off obsolescence for as long as possible. In the case of the above models, is the extra money worth spending?


You, sir, have just described a mac :lol:


I don't know if that is true. From personal experience, Macs are only slightly betters in terms of endurance. However, what sets them apart is technical support. After the initial one-year warranty, they charge an arm and a leg, but they do get the job done quickly. On the PC side, IBM/Lenovo is very good with their tech support. Dell and HP provide much better support when it comes to their business machines.

Furthermore, what you are forgetting that the majority of the planet runs on Windows, especially in the business world. With Apple computers, the one thing that you always have to deal with is compatibility. I expect that to change. But that will take awhile, assuming the Apple trends continue to grow.

I would say going with the Thinkpad on this one is a better choice. Unlike the regular consumer computers, they don't load crapware, which is a nice plus. Although you can do without their extra tools.

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sheltron5000
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Re: The Ideal Law School Laptop

Postby sheltron5000 » Thu Jun 11, 2009 2:11 pm

vut wrote:
sheltron5000 wrote:
Metternich wrote:Do you guys think that the X300/X301 is worth $600 or so more dollars than the T400, similarly equipped? (Some of the fantastic promotions which other posters have referenced have made both models surpisingly affordable.) I hate computers and will only be using one because, even I'll admit, they are all but essential to success in law school. That said, part of the reason I hate them is because I've had such bad luck with mediocre systems in the past. Within reason, I want to buy a proven, reliable, portable computer that will endure three or more years of hard use and stave off obsolescence for as long as possible. In the case of the above models, is the extra money worth spending?


You, sir, have just described a mac :lol:


I don't know if that is true. From personal experience, Macs are only slightly betters in terms of endurance. However, what sets them apart is technical support. After the initial one-year warranty, they charge an arm and a leg, but they do get the job done quickly. On the PC side, IBM/Lenovo is very good with their tech support. Dell and HP provide much better support when it comes to their business machines.

Furthermore, what you are forgetting that the majority of the planet runs on Windows, especially in the business world. With Apple computers, the one thing that you always have to deal with is compatibility. I expect that to change. But that will take awhile, assuming the Apple trends continue to grow.

I would say going with the Thinkpad on this one is a better choice. Unlike the regular consumer computers, they don't load crapware, which is a nice plus. Although you can do without their extra tools.


What Metternich described was a computer that will avoid obsolesence for at least three years, put up with heavy use and abuse, and basically just work. All windows pcs get rundown, if you don't "refresh" them every year or two, even assuming they last that long. While I agree with you on the quality of the thinkpads, their customer service, plus the need for a fair amount of computer savvy to keep pc systems running for that long without headaches, really goes toward a mac.

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vut
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Re: The Ideal Law School Laptop

Postby vut » Thu Jun 11, 2009 2:40 pm

sheltron5000 wrote:What Metternich described was a computer that will avoid obsolesence for at least three years, put up with heavy use and abuse, and basically just work. All windows pcs get rundown, if you don't "refresh" them every year or two, even assuming they last that long. While I agree with you on the quality of the thinkpads, their customer service, plus the need for a fair amount of computer savvy to keep pc systems running for that long without headaches, really goes toward a mac.


I understand what Metternich described, and that is why I mentioned the business lineups on the PC side. The main purpose of business machines is to withstand abuse from heavy usage. Unlike the regular consumer laptops, supports for business machines are also more professional and prompt. The machines are better built, too. Not pretty, but solidly built. That is the reason why they last. You can easily find 4 year-old Dell Optiplex still sold on eBay at competitive prices.

While I do agree that we hear a lot of talks about the need to reinstall Windows from time to time, I really do think that largely results from tinkerers and porn surfers. If you can stay away from those two, you are fine running Windows. I really do try to speak from an unbiased point of view. I have no problems with Macs, as I own one, too.

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djshack
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Re: The Ideal Law School Laptop

Postby djshack » Thu Jun 11, 2009 2:53 pm

vut wrote:
sheltron5000 wrote:
Metternich wrote:Do you guys think that the X300/X301 is worth $600 or so more dollars than the T400, similarly equipped? (Some of the fantastic promotions which other posters have referenced have made both models surpisingly affordable.) I hate computers and will only be using one because, even I'll admit, they are all but essential to success in law school. That said, part of the reason I hate them is because I've had such bad luck with mediocre systems in the past. Within reason, I want to buy a proven, reliable, portable computer that will endure three or more years of hard use and stave off obsolescence for as long as possible. In the case of the above models, is the extra money worth spending?


You, sir, have just described a mac :lol:


I don't know if that is true. From personal experience, Macs are only slightly betters in terms of endurance. However, what sets them apart is technical support. After the initial one-year warranty, they charge an arm and a leg, but they do get the job done quickly. On the PC side, IBM/Lenovo is very good with their tech support. Dell and HP provide much better support when it comes to their business machines.

Furthermore, what you are forgetting that the majority of the planet runs on Windows, especially in the business world. With Apple computers, the one thing that you always have to deal with is compatibility. I expect that to change. But that will take awhile, assuming the Apple trends continue to grow.

I would say going with the Thinkpad on this one is a better choice. Unlike the regular consumer computers, they don't load crapware, which is a nice plus. Although you can do without their extra tools.

As a former Mac user, I agree with all of the above. Also, keep in mind Windows 7 is coming out in October, and it's very nice.

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sheltron5000
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Re: The Ideal Law School Laptop

Postby sheltron5000 » Thu Jun 11, 2009 2:55 pm

business notebooks are also targeted at large corporations with hordes of IT people to fix their issues. :D

Not that I disagree with you completely, I just think, from what he described and how he described it, that a mac is a better choice. I don't think that's true for everyone.

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vut
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Re: The Ideal Law School Laptop

Postby vut » Thu Jun 11, 2009 3:30 pm

sheltron5000 wrote:business notebooks are also targeted at large corporations with hordes of IT people to fix their issues. :D


What are you talking about specifically?

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sheltron5000
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Re: The Ideal Law School Laptop

Postby sheltron5000 » Thu Jun 11, 2009 5:01 pm

vut wrote:
sheltron5000 wrote:business notebooks are also targeted at large corporations with hordes of IT people to fix their issues. :D


What are you talking about specifically?


I'm not thinking about anything in particular, just all the calls I, and most other relatively savvy computer users, get from friends and family. Not to mention all the questions I've heard people asking their IT people.

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superflush
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Re: The Ideal Law School Laptop

Postby superflush » Thu Jun 11, 2009 7:29 pm

For those of you about to buy a T400:

http://www.engadget.com/2009/06/11/leno ... n-officia/




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