Taking the LSAT twice

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WillyBeachem
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Joined: Mon Nov 17, 2008 8:53 am

Taking the LSAT twice

Postby WillyBeachem » Mon Nov 17, 2008 12:04 pm

I am signed up to take the December 6th LSAT, but I think I might not be ready. I have only been studying for a couple weeks, is a month of full time studying enough? When I signed up I didnt know that some schools look at all scores, not just the highest.

Every person I ask tells me something different. One person tells me I should have started studying years ago. The next tells me it is impossible to study for the LSAT, so I should just take it. Yet another person tells me that I need to take the practice tests to get used to the questions and time limit, but that wont take long and I should be ready.

So who is right? Did I make a mistake signing up or will I be OK? I am not applying to any top law schools, mostly 2nd tier. Are lower rated schools more likely to just look at the highest LSAT score?

Thanks

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silver11
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Re: Taking the LSAT twice

Postby silver11 » Mon Nov 17, 2008 12:09 pm

Whoever told you that you cannot study is completely wrong. You need about 3-6 months to really get a good grip on the LSAT and reach your potential on the test. You do need to do a lot of practice tests in real conditions to get a feel for the test and work on your time management.

WillyBeachem
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Joined: Mon Nov 17, 2008 8:53 am

Re: Taking the LSAT twice

Postby WillyBeachem » Mon Nov 17, 2008 12:32 pm

Thanks, but should not even take it December 5th or should I study my butt off and if I score poorly I can take it again.

I figure I can get about 100 hours of studying in (including what I have already put in) before then. Is that enough? What should I do?

kartman
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Joined: Sat Nov 08, 2008 8:42 am

Re: Taking the LSAT twice

Postby kartman » Mon Nov 17, 2008 12:38 pm

Here's the deal -

1) Taking the LSAT twice -- Schools look at the highest score for admission. They look at the average for Financial Aid. If you have a low first score and it was the consequence of a special circumstance then write an addendum.

2) Studying for the LSAT depends on the person. I have friends who didn't study much for it yet managed above a 90th percentile in their first attempt. If you're comfortable with the material then there is no prescribed amount of time you SHOULD spend with the books.

3) Solve a practice test as a diagnostic and see where you stand. Solving 10 Tests before the exam would give you a very good idea about where you would land on the actual day.

4) Try and be positive. There is alot of negativity flying around on forums, have faith in what you can do!

Summing it up -- Taking the LSAT twice is NOT a big deal as long as you make the second attempt count. No school will reject an auto admit with a good second attempt score just because that person bombed their first attempt (financial aid is a different story altogether).

Hope this helps.

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doctorgonzo
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Re: Taking the LSAT twice

Postby doctorgonzo » Mon Nov 17, 2008 12:47 pm

That said, if you know you won't be prepared for the December test, don't take it. While most schools look at the higher score these days, it still looks better for you to take it once and do well than to take it twice.

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zabagabe
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Re: Taking the LSAT twice

Postby zabagabe » Mon Nov 17, 2008 1:39 pm

kartman wrote:Here's the deal -

1) Taking the LSAT twice -- Schools look at the highest score for admission. They look at the average for Financial Aid. If you have a low first score and it was the consequence of a special circumstance then write an addendum.


I have no concrete information to contend that this is false, but it seems very odd that this is an absolute rule. If they really want someone (ie, if you're well above their medians with your higher score), why wouldn't they want to be competitive in their financial aid offers? I get the sense that financial aid is primarily used to secure top students away from other schools, not as a reward for a particular LSAT score in a vacuum.

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silver11
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Re: Taking the LSAT twice

Postby silver11 » Mon Nov 17, 2008 1:41 pm

I don't think they do this as often as everyone thinks they do.

wiscohopeful
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Joined: Fri Jun 20, 2008 9:13 pm

Re: Taking the LSAT twice

Postby wiscohopeful » Mon Nov 17, 2008 1:45 pm

To the OP...Are you applying this cycle? If not, I do not see the point of taking it in December if you don't feel you can adequately prepare for it. Just study and take it in Feb or June or even next Oct...

TheJackson6
Posts: 8
Joined: Fri Sep 05, 2008 2:28 am

Re: Taking the LSAT twice

Postby TheJackson6 » Mon Nov 17, 2008 1:53 pm

kartman wrote:Here's the deal -

1) Taking the LSAT twice -- Schools look at the highest score for admission. They look at the average for Financial Aid. If you have a low first score and it was the consequence of a special circumstance then write an addendum.

2) Studying for the LSAT depends on the person. I have friends who didn't study much for it yet managed above a 90th percentile in their first attempt. If you're comfortable with the material then there is no prescribed amount of time you SHOULD spend with the books.

3) Solve a practice test as a diagnostic and see where you stand. Solving 10 Tests before the exam would give you a very good idea about where you would land on the actual day.

4) Try and be positive. There is alot of negativity flying around on forums, have faith in what you can do!

Summing it up -- Taking the LSAT twice is NOT a big deal as long as you make the second attempt count. No school will reject an auto admit with a good second attempt score just because that person bombed their first attempt (financial aid is a different story altogether).

Hope this helps.


This is NOT the deal. Schools such as HYS generally average scores, and several T-14s will average unless the applicant's increase was 5 or more points. Still others require an addendum explaining why the higher score should be considered; I have no idea how harshly they scrutinize these but I doubt that it is very much. Since Willy is applying to 2nd tier schools they will mostly take the higher score but he should still be sure to write an addendum.

The second point is sort of silly; yes, there are plenty of people who are naturally good at the LSAT but why do worse than you could? If your potential score is a 175 why settle for a 170? That of course is predicated on the notion that you want to go to the very best school possible; if not then put in as much effort as you feel.

The third point is not bad advice, but the more prep the merrier.

Finally, I have never heard that financial aid is "a different story altogether." Would you mind providing some examples?

But really, Willy, you should do however much prep you feel is appropriate. Law school is a major investment of time, money, and energy. However much prep you want to do is how much you should do. Best of luck in December.

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Lizface killah
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Joined: Fri Oct 24, 2008 7:28 pm

Re: Taking the LSAT twice

Postby Lizface killah » Mon Nov 17, 2008 1:57 pm

WillyBeachem wrote:I am signed up to take the December 6th LSAT, but I think I might not be ready. I have only been studying for a couple weeks, is a month of full time studying enough? When I signed up I didnt know that some schools look at all scores, not just the highest.

Every person I ask tells me something different. One person tells me I should have started studying years ago. The next tells me it is impossible to study for the LSAT, so I should just take it. Yet another person tells me that I need to take the practice tests to get used to the questions and time limit, but that wont take long and I should be ready.

So who is right? Did I make a mistake signing up or will I be OK? I am not applying to any top law schools, mostly 2nd tier. Are lower rated schools more likely to just look at the highest LSAT score?

Thanks


How quickly you master the skills you need for the test definitely varies from person to person. Take a full diagnostic practice test under realistic conditions (35 min per section, only one break, throw in 5th section to simulate the experimental) study intensely for a few days and then take another one, study more, take another one... and so on. If you don't like how you're progressing, then by all means change your test date and give yourself enough time to walk into the testing center feeling prepared. You might be pleasantly surprised, there are plenty of people that can get T2 acceptable scores cold. That said, it's best to go into the test with in the intention of only taking it once.

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hopeforthebest
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Re: Taking the LSAT twice

Postby hopeforthebest » Mon Nov 17, 2008 2:05 pm

Many people may not recommend this, but here's what I did after I BOMBED the test the first time...

I was convinced that what did me in the first time was that I was not seeing the progress that I thought I should when I was taking the practice tests under testing conditions. I was studying my ASS off, and yet failed to see any increase in my score. So the second time around, I did not take even ONE practice test before the actual test in October. I know, GASP. I studied the Bibles, which I wish I had known about the first time around and then I wouldn't have wasted $1200 on a Kaplan PrepClass that did absolutely NOTHING to help prepare me for the test. And, what do you know, I did significantly better my second time around (LSAC considers a significant jump to be 5 pts or higher) without touching a PrepTest.

So the moral of the story I guess is figure out what sort of studying works best for you and then stick with that. And I highly recommend the LG and LR Bibles (didn't get the RC Bible). And most importantly, BELIEVE IN YOURSELF. You can do it! Good luck!

zero1
Posts: 90
Joined: Tue Nov 04, 2008 2:50 pm

Re: Taking the LSAT twice

Postby zero1 » Mon Nov 17, 2008 2:09 pm

TheJackson6 wrote:
kartman wrote:Here's the deal -

1) Taking the LSAT twice -- Schools look at the highest score for admission. They look at the average for Financial Aid. If you have a low first score and it was the consequence of a special circumstance then write an addendum.

2) Studying for the LSAT depends on the person. I have friends who didn't study much for it yet managed above a 90th percentile in their first attempt. If you're comfortable with the material then there is no prescribed amount of time you SHOULD spend with the books.

3) Solve a practice test as a diagnostic and see where you stand. Solving 10 Tests before the exam would give you a very good idea about where you would land on the actual day.

4) Try and be positive. There is alot of negativity flying around on forums, have faith in what you can do!

Summing it up -- Taking the LSAT twice is NOT a big deal as long as you make the second attempt count. No school will reject an auto admit with a good second attempt score just because that person bombed their first attempt (financial aid is a different story altogether).

Hope this helps.


This is NOT the deal. Schools such as HYS generally average scores, and several T-14s will average unless the applicant's increase was 5 or more points. Still others require an addendum explaining why the higher score should be considered; I have no idea how harshly they scrutinize these but I doubt that it is very much. Since Willy is applying to 2nd tier schools they will mostly take the higher score but he should still be sure to write an addendum.

The second point is sort of silly; yes, there are plenty of people who are naturally good at the LSAT but why do worse than you could? If your potential score is a 175 why settle for a 170? That of course is predicated on the notion that you want to go to the very best school possible; if not then put in as much effort as you feel.

The third point is not bad advice, but the more prep the merrier.

Finally, I have never heard that financial aid is "a different story altogether." Would you mind providing some examples?

But really, Willy, you should do however much prep you feel is appropriate. Law school is a major investment of time, money, and energy. However much prep you want to do is how much you should do. Best of luck in December.



What if it's above 5 points? The difference between the two score, that is.

kartman
Posts: 3
Joined: Sat Nov 08, 2008 8:42 am

Re: Taking the LSAT twice

Postby kartman » Mon Nov 17, 2008 2:16 pm

TheJackson6 wrote:
kartman wrote:Here's the deal -

1) Taking the LSAT twice -- Schools look at the highest score for admission. They look at the average for Financial Aid. If you have a low first score and it was the consequence of a special circumstance then write an addendum.

2) Studying for the LSAT depends on the person. I have friends who didn't study much for it yet managed above a 90th percentile in their first attempt. If you're comfortable with the material then there is no prescribed amount of time you SHOULD spend with the books.

3) Solve a practice test as a diagnostic and see where you stand. Solving 10 Tests before the exam would give you a very good idea about where you would land on the actual day.

4) Try and be positive. There is alot of negativity flying around on forums, have faith in what you can do!

Summing it up -- Taking the LSAT twice is NOT a big deal as long as you make the second attempt count. No school will reject an auto admit with a good second attempt score just because that person bombed their first attempt (financial aid is a different story altogether).

Hope this helps.


This is NOT the deal. Schools such as HYS generally average scores, and several T-14s will average unless the applicant's increase was 5 or more points. Still others require an addendum explaining why the higher score should be considered; I have no idea how harshly they scrutinize these but I doubt that it is very much. Since Willy is applying to 2nd tier schools they will mostly take the higher score but he should still be sure to write an addendum.

The second point is sort of silly; yes, there are plenty of people who are naturally good at the LSAT but why do worse than you could? If your potential score is a 175 why settle for a 170? That of course is predicated on the notion that you want to go to the very best school possible; if not then put in as much effort as you feel.

The third point is not bad advice, but the more prep the merrier.

Finally, I have never heard that financial aid is "a different story altogether." Would you mind providing some examples?

But really, Willy, you should do however much prep you feel is appropriate. Law school is a major investment of time, money, and energy. However much prep you want to do is how much you should do. Best of luck in December.


My reply is in your reply to my earlier response. I said the higher score would be taken because Willy is applying to a T2 school. Also, I never mentioned that the first attempt should be casual, I merely said that even if one does not score well on the first attempt the second attempt is more than acceptable to schools if there is an improvement.

Be as prepared as you can for the first attempt BUT if ANYBODY has to take a second shot at the test then they should not be let down by the fact that they did not score well the first time. That is the gist of what I was saying.

kartman
Posts: 3
Joined: Sat Nov 08, 2008 8:42 am

Re: Taking the LSAT twice

Postby kartman » Mon Nov 17, 2008 2:19 pm

zero1 wrote:
TheJackson6 wrote:
kartman wrote:Here's the deal -

1) Taking the LSAT twice -- Schools look at the highest score for admission. They look at the average for Financial Aid. If you have a low first score and it was the consequence of a special circumstance then write an addendum.

2) Studying for the LSAT depends on the person. I have friends who didn't study much for it yet managed above a 90th percentile in their first attempt. If you're comfortable with the material then there is no prescribed amount of time you SHOULD spend with the books.

3) Solve a practice test as a diagnostic and see where you stand. Solving 10 Tests before the exam would give you a very good idea about where you would land on the actual day.

4) Try and be positive. There is alot of negativity flying around on forums, have faith in what you can do!

Summing it up -- Taking the LSAT twice is NOT a big deal as long as you make the second attempt count. No school will reject an auto admit with a good second attempt score just because that person bombed their first attempt (financial aid is a different story altogether).

Hope this helps.


This is NOT the deal. Schools such as HYS generally average scores, and several T-14s will average unless the applicant's increase was 5 or more points. Still others require an addendum explaining why the higher score should be considered; I have no idea how harshly they scrutinize these but I doubt that it is very much. Since Willy is applying to 2nd tier schools they will mostly take the higher score but he should still be sure to write an addendum.

The second point is sort of silly; yes, there are plenty of people who are naturally good at the LSAT but why do worse than you could? If your potential score is a 175 why settle for a 170? That of course is predicated on the notion that you want to go to the very best school possible; if not then put in as much effort as you feel.

The third point is not bad advice, but the more prep the merrier.

Finally, I have never heard that financial aid is "a different story altogether." Would you mind providing some examples?

But really, Willy, you should do however much prep you feel is appropriate. Law school is a major investment of time, money, and energy. However much prep you want to do is how much you should do. Best of luck in December.



What if it's above 5 points? The difference between the two score, that is.



Then, that is considered a "significant" increase and the higher score is apparently considered for admission. Even HYS will consider a significant increase.

zero1
Posts: 90
Joined: Tue Nov 04, 2008 2:50 pm

Re: Taking the LSAT twice

Postby zero1 » Mon Nov 17, 2008 2:21 pm

kartman wrote:
zero1 wrote:
TheJackson6 wrote:
kartman wrote:Here's the deal -

1) Taking the LSAT twice -- Schools look at the highest score for admission. They look at the average for Financial Aid. If you have a low first score and it was the consequence of a special circumstance then write an addendum.

2) Studying for the LSAT depends on the person. I have friends who didn't study much for it yet managed above a 90th percentile in their first attempt. If you're comfortable with the material then there is no prescribed amount of time you SHOULD spend with the books.

3) Solve a practice test as a diagnostic and see where you stand. Solving 10 Tests before the exam would give you a very good idea about where you would land on the actual day.

4) Try and be positive. There is alot of negativity flying around on forums, have faith in what you can do!

Summing it up -- Taking the LSAT twice is NOT a big deal as long as you make the second attempt count. No school will reject an auto admit with a good second attempt score just because that person bombed their first attempt (financial aid is a different story altogether).

Hope this helps.


This is NOT the deal. Schools such as HYS generally average scores, and several T-14s will average unless the applicant's increase was 5 or more points. Still others require an addendum explaining why the higher score should be considered; I have no idea how harshly they scrutinize these but I doubt that it is very much. Since Willy is applying to 2nd tier schools they will mostly take the higher score but he should still be sure to write an addendum.

The second point is sort of silly; yes, there are plenty of people who are naturally good at the LSAT but why do worse than you could? If your potential score is a 175 why settle for a 170? That of course is predicated on the notion that you want to go to the very best school possible; if not then put in as much effort as you feel.

The third point is not bad advice, but the more prep the merrier.

Finally, I have never heard that financial aid is "a different story altogether." Would you mind providing some examples?

But really, Willy, you should do however much prep you feel is appropriate. Law school is a major investment of time, money, and energy. However much prep you want to do is how much you should do. Best of luck in December.



What if it's above 5 points? The difference between the two score, that is.



Then, that is considered a "significant" increase and the higher score is apparently considered for admission. Even HYS will consider a significant increase.


So, they give you the benefit of the doubt? Cool. Got a 166 the first time. Let's say I get a 175 (!!!!!) and have an addendum......what do you think is going to happen?

TheJackson6
Posts: 8
Joined: Fri Sep 05, 2008 2:28 am

Re: Taking the LSAT twice

Postby TheJackson6 » Mon Nov 17, 2008 2:26 pm

zero1 wrote:So, they give you the benefit of the doubt? Cool. Got a 166 the first time. Let's say I get a 175 (!!!!!) and have an addendum......what do you think is going to happen?

Again, HYS would not necessarily give you the benefit of the doubt. That being said, they might. They're capricious like that. If you got a 175 you could probably go to a T6 provided your GPA wasn't wretched.




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