Law School Hopeful

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gking97

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Law School Hopeful

Postby gking97 » Mon Dec 03, 2018 11:20 pm

Hello all,

I'm writing today for a bit of guidance, as well as some clarification. I have been in love with the idea of law school since I moved to the United States from Ireland as a sophomore in HS, but with the current student debt crisis I seem to be questioning the outcome of such an undertaking . I'm currently a junior at a state school in MA, majoring in International Business. I would love to pursue law to become an immigration attorney, as I would love to give back to the foreign nationals in the United States that are seeking permanent status, since I could once identify as one of those people.

I currently have a 3.55 GPA, but it's shaping up to be more in the 3.6 area by graduation next year. I have not taken the LSAT yet, and plan to do so this summer. I am practicing logic games and starting to do some LSAT study now but intend to do the bulk of the studying during/after winter break.

I have had three internships, one at a multinational technology company, one at a FFRDC, and another at a local recruitment firm near my uni. I can get some really great recommendations from a professor of mine, and another from my boss and my internship.

So here's my qualm.

I know I won't be a T14 applicant, probably not even T20. My dream school is Northeastern Law with their co-op program but I would also love BC with their Irish heritage. Is it worth taking on potentially 6 figure debt to go to either of these schools?

Any info you guys can give me would be wholly appreciated.
G

cavalier1138

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Re: Law School Hopeful

Postby cavalier1138 » Tue Dec 04, 2018 6:54 am

gking97 wrote:My dream school is Northeastern Law with their co-op program but I would also love BC with their Irish heritage. Is it worth taking on potentially 6 figure debt to go to either of these schools?


Absolutely not.

Even if you're dead-set on immigration law, you'd be wholly reliant on PSLF. I don't believe that either of those schools has an LRAP program to help public interest students. Also, not to put too fine a point on it, but are you sure you know the demographics of the immigrant population in Massachusetts? I understand that you went through similar processes, but the overwhelming majority of your clients won't be Irish (and won't have come here seeking permanent resident status; they'll have much more pressing goals, like avoiding deportation). It just seems like your point of identification with the immigrants you'd be representing is a little weak, especially since it doesn't seem like you have any experience in the field.

You should get a high enough LSAT that you can go to one of these schools for free (or a T13 with a good scholarship, which isn't out of the question if you get a decent LSAT). But I'd strongly recommend taking some time off school to work. If you think you're interested in immigration law, you should try and get some work with groups involved in immigration and/or civil rights. Your current work experience and educational focus doesn't match your stated goal.

gking97

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Posts: 2
Joined: Mon Dec 03, 2018 11:10 pm

Re: Law School Hopeful

Postby gking97 » Tue Dec 04, 2018 11:13 am

cavalier1138 wrote:
gking97 wrote:My dream school is Northeastern Law with their co-op program but I would also love BC with their Irish heritage. Is it worth taking on potentially 6 figure debt to go to either of these schools?


Absolutely not.

Even if you're dead-set on immigration law, you'd be wholly reliant on PSLF. I don't believe that either of those schools has an LRAP program to help public interest students. Also, not to put too fine a point on it, but are you sure you know the demographics of the immigrant population in Massachusetts? I understand that you went through similar processes, but the overwhelming majority of your clients won't be Irish (and won't have come here seeking permanent resident status; they'll have much more pressing goals, like avoiding deportation). It just seems like your point of identification with the immigrants you'd be representing is a little weak, especially since it doesn't seem like you have any experience in the field.

You should get a high enough LSAT that you can go to one of these schools for free (or a T13 with a good scholarship, which isn't out of the question if you get a decent LSAT). But I'd strongly recommend taking some time off school to work. If you think you're interested in immigration law, you should try and get some work with groups involved in immigration and/or civil rights. Your current work experience and educational focus doesn't match your stated goal.


Hi cavalier,

Thanks for taking the time to reply firstly. I appreciate your advice on working with immigration or civil rights groups, and I agree that I need work experience that aligns with my goals.

To your other point about the majority of those seeking legal help in regards to immigration law, I actually live in SE Mass. and have been exposed to the different Hispanic communities in the area. I know I'm lucky to be in I'm situation as an immigrant, and also speak Spanish. I probably should have mentioned that! :)

QContinuum

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Joined: Mon Aug 07, 2017 9:52 am

Re: Law School Hopeful

Postby QContinuum » Tue Dec 04, 2018 1:11 pm

cavalier1138 wrote:Absolutely not.

Even if you're dead-set on immigration law, you'd be wholly reliant on PSLF. I don't believe that either of those schools has an LRAP program to help public interest students. Also, not to put too fine a point on it, but are you sure you know the demographics of the immigrant population in Massachusetts? I understand that you went through similar processes, but the overwhelming majority of your clients won't be Irish (and won't have come here seeking permanent resident status; they'll have much more pressing goals, like avoiding deportation). It just seems like your point of identification with the immigrants you'd be representing is a little weak, especially since it doesn't seem like you have any experience in the field.

You should get a high enough LSAT that you can go to one of these schools for free (or a T13 with a good scholarship, which isn't out of the question if you get a decent LSAT). But I'd strongly recommend taking some time off school to work. If you think you're interested in immigration law, you should try and get some work with groups involved in immigration and/or civil rights. Your current work experience and educational focus doesn't match your stated goal.

+1 to all of the above. A 3.55-3.6 is far from awful, and you could easily get into a T20 or even a T13 with a strong LSAT score (including possibly with merit aid). While you can certainly do PI work from a T1 or T2, you'd still maximize your career options and geographical flexibility from a T13/T20 (e.g., if you ever want to leave Boston, or if you develop an interest in clerking for a judge or pursuing impact litigation or joining a high-profile nonprofit). And having a good law school LRAP to rely on (as the T13/T20 offer) in addition to PSLF is far better than being fully/solely reliant on PSLF.



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