guess my plan to take the GRE multiple times backfired spectaculary

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physicsmaestro
Posts: 2
Joined: Tue Nov 14, 2017 7:41 am

guess my plan to take the GRE multiple times backfired spectaculary

Postby physicsmaestro » Tue Nov 14, 2017 7:45 am

I'm currently in graduate school doing a phd in math. When I heard law schools are beginning to accept GRE scores in lieu of LSAT scores, i was like yes!!! My original plan was to just take the GRE as many times as I need to till i get that glorious 170 on both sections. So.. i went on and took the GRE twice without much prep. Little did i know.. some schools such as Harvard explicitly state that you must send all your GRE scores. Well.. my very first GRE score will expire soon because i took it before i began my PhD program. So.. I have the recent two GRE scores I will have to report.
They are as follows: 165 verbal 169 quant 5 on essay and 168 verbal 170 quant 6 on essay. It seems GRE gets a lot of hate from conventional law school applicants and I sort of see why... Anyhow, ETS does not have any indication on the test report sent to school whether or not the applicant took the test multiple times. So.. my question is "how will law schools enforce their policy of requiring applicants' entire GRE test taking history?

cavalier1138
Posts: 4486
Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2016 8:01 pm

Re: guess my plan to take the GRE multiple times backfired spectaculary

Postby cavalier1138 » Tue Nov 14, 2017 7:53 am

No one knows. This is the first year the GRE is being accepted.

You should be much more concerned about selling the adcomms on your desire to go to law school immediately after getting a doctorate in Math.

ETA: I mean that no one knows how they'll treat multiple scores. Everyone knows how they'll treat people who try to hide multiple takes.

lobsicle
Posts: 38
Joined: Fri Oct 06, 2017 1:33 pm

Re: guess my plan to take the GRE multiple times backfired spectaculary

Postby lobsicle » Tue Nov 14, 2017 8:58 am

physicsmaestro wrote:I'm currently in graduate school doing a phd in math. When I heard law schools are beginning to accept GRE scores in lieu of LSAT scores, i was like yes!!! My original plan was to just take the GRE as many times as I need to till i get that glorious 170 on both sections. So.. i went on and took the GRE twice without much prep. Little did i know.. some schools such as Harvard explicitly state that you must send all your GRE scores. Well.. my very first GRE score will expire soon because i took it before i began my PhD program. So.. I have the recent two GRE scores I will have to report.
They are as follows: 165 verbal 169 quant 5 on essay and 168 verbal 170 quant 6 on essay. It seems GRE gets a lot of hate from conventional law school applicants and I sort of see why... Anyhow, ETS does not have any indication on the test report sent to school whether or not the applicant took the test multiple times. So.. my question is "how will law schools enforce their policy of requiring applicants' entire GRE test taking history?


Well if you're telling the truth about your Math PhD program and scores, then you've just outed yourself to adcomms who read these boards. So I'd submit both scores if you're required to.

CottonHarvest
Posts: 214
Joined: Wed Mar 02, 2016 11:49 pm

Re: guess my plan to take the GRE multiple times backfired spectaculary

Postby CottonHarvest » Tue Nov 14, 2017 9:04 am

physicsmaestro wrote:I'm currently in graduate school doing a phd in math. When I heard law schools are beginning to accept GRE scores in lieu of LSAT scores, i was like yes!!! My original plan was to just take the GRE as many times as I need to till i get that glorious 170 on both sections. So.. i went on and took the GRE twice without much prep. Little did i know.. some schools such as Harvard explicitly state that you must send all your GRE scores. Well.. my very first GRE score will expire soon because i took it before i began my PhD program. So.. I have the recent two GRE scores I will have to report.
They are as follows: 165 verbal 169 quant 5 on essay and 168 verbal 170 quant 6 on essay. It seems GRE gets a lot of hate from conventional law school applicants and I sort of see why... Anyhow, ETS does not have any indication on the test report sent to school whether or not the applicant took the test multiple times. So.. my question is "how will law schools enforce their policy of requiring applicants' entire GRE test taking history?

You have a 168(98%)/170(97%)/6(99%) on file. Your plan didn’t backfire. You’re fine.

physicsmaestro
Posts: 2
Joined: Tue Nov 14, 2017 7:41 am

Re: guess my plan to take the GRE multiple times backfired spectaculary

Postby physicsmaestro » Tue Nov 14, 2017 4:39 pm

lobsicle wrote:
physicsmaestro wrote:I'm currently in graduate school doing a phd in math. When I heard law schools are beginning to accept GRE scores in lieu of LSAT scores, i was like yes!!! My original plan was to just take the GRE as many times as I need to till i get that glorious 170 on both sections. So.. i went on and took the GRE twice without much prep. Little did i know.. some schools such as Harvard explicitly state that you must send all your GRE scores. Well.. my very first GRE score will expire soon because i took it before i began my PhD program. So.. I have the recent two GRE scores I will have to report.
They are as follows: 165 verbal 169 quant 5 on essay and 168 verbal 170 quant 6 on essay. It seems GRE gets a lot of hate from conventional law school applicants and I sort of see why... Anyhow, ETS does not have any indication on the test report sent to school whether or not the applicant took the test multiple times. So.. my question is "how will law schools enforce their policy of requiring applicants' entire GRE test taking history?


Well if you're telling the truth about your Math PhD program and scores, then you've just outed yourself to adcomms who read these boards. So I'd submit both scores if you're required to.



I was gonna submit all my scores regardless. I know how schools have the right to rescind admissions offers on the basis of even the tiniest discrepancies. I was just curious how they would actually enforce this policy.




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