At What Point Does Working Become an Opportunity Cost

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onlyhere4fun

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At What Point Does Working Become an Opportunity Cost

Postby onlyhere4fun » Wed May 17, 2017 9:31 am

Hey All,

As I'm nearing my first year work-anniversary, I've been contemplating how much longer I should continue working at this job before I go to law school. I know typically 1-2 years of work experience is standard (removes the k-jd problem), but after how many years does working hurt more than help? I understand that in the scope of law school admissions, work experience isn't that significant, especially if the experience isn't rare/remarkable, but what number of years working seems like a good point to just stop and go to law school? 2, 3, maybe even 4 years? There are some benefits from working a longer period of time, like a stronger letter of rec from your employer, demonstrated ability to work in a professional field, more interview talking points, etc. But are those softs worth staying 3-4 years at a job rather than 2 for example? Any insight would be appreciated. Thanks.

cavalier1138

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Re: At What Point Does Working Become an Opportunity Cost

Postby cavalier1138 » Wed May 17, 2017 9:42 am

There is no point of diminishing returns on work experience with respect to admissions. But I'd advise finding a job that you actually have at least some level of interest in, rather than trying to use work as a resume-padder for law school.

Npret

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Re: At What Point Does Working Become an Opportunity Cost

Postby Npret » Wed May 17, 2017 9:43 am

onlyhere4fun wrote:Hey All,

As I'm nearing my first year work-anniversary, I've been contemplating how much longer I should continue working at this job before I go to law school. I know typically 1-2 years of work experience is standard (removes the k-jd problem), but after how many years does working hurt more than help? I understand that in the scope of law school admissions, work experience isn't that significant, especially if the experience isn't rare/remarkable, but what number of years working seems like a good point to just stop and go to law school? 2, 3, maybe even 4 years? There are some benefits from working a longer period of time, like a stronger letter of rec from your employer, demonstrated ability to work in a professional field, more interview talking points, etc. But are those softs worth staying 3-4 years at a job rather than 2 for example? Any insight would be appreciated. Thanks.

Work experience can also help with OCI not just admissions. I don't think there is a majic number.



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