A few questions - mostly about timing.

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CheyenneGarrett17

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A few questions - mostly about timing.

Postby CheyenneGarrett17 » Sat Nov 26, 2016 1:57 am

So I’m in a bit of a bind and would like some other opinions. I will try to keep this short.

I am currently in my fifth year as an UG - I am currently 23 and feel like I am already behind and older than everyone else. I planned on graduating next December (then taking Spring 18 to study for the LSAT, and take the test in June 18 to apply the following fall).

But I was informed of two pretty exciting opportunities have me considering extending my time in college for another semester - a sort of pre-law journal and the opportunity to work with a faculty member and produce a thesis. However, this would move my timeline a bit - graduating in May 18, studying for the LSAT for one year to take the test in June 19, and starting LS in 2020 instead of 2019. However, between being ‘red-shirted’ as a kid and spending more time in UG, if I follow this plan I will be entering LS at 27, graduating LS when I am 30 (as opposed to starting at 26, graduating at 29).


So, a few questions…


I have posted about spending more than 4 years in UG on here before, and the general consensus seemed to be it really doesn’t matter. Does this still hold true for being in UG 6 rather than 5 years?

Benefits of working on this UG journal related to constitutional democracy? How about writing a thesis? Or is it not worth the extra time?

Risks or costs of entering law school at 27 and graduating at 30? Or even 26 and 29? I am a woman, if that is significant in terms of age (aside from the typical ‘my ovaries are drying up’ stuff). Does the extra time to study for the LSAT outweigh the risk of being a year older? Is 8 months enough for LSAT prep or is 1 year more realistic?

Any opinions would be helpful. Sorry if this sounds scatterbrained. Every time I think I have this all figured and mapped out, something throws a wrench in it and I question everything.

Y’all have been an invaluable resources in considering all of this, so thanks for everything and thanks in advance.

curry1

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Re: A few questions - mostly about timing.

Postby curry1 » Sat Nov 26, 2016 3:56 am

CheyenneGarrett17 wrote:So I’m in a bit of a bind and would like some other opinions. I will try to keep this short.

I am currently in my fifth year as an UG - I am currently 23 and feel like I am already behind and older than everyone else. I planned on graduating next December (then taking Spring 18 to study for the LSAT, and take the test in June 18 to apply the following fall).

But I was informed of two pretty exciting opportunities have me considering extending my time in college for another semester - a sort of pre-law journal and the opportunity to work with a faculty member and produce a thesis. However, this would move my timeline a bit - graduating in May 18, studying for the LSAT for one year to take the test in June 19, and starting LS in 2020 instead of 2019. However, between being ‘red-shirted’ as a kid and spending more time in UG, if I follow this plan I will be entering LS at 27, graduating LS when I am 30 (as opposed to starting at 26, graduating at 29).


So, a few questions…


I have posted about spending more than 4 years in UG on here before, and the general consensus seemed to be it really doesn’t matter. Does this still hold true for being in UG 6 rather than 5 years?

Benefits of working on this UG journal related to constitutional democracy? How about writing a thesis? Or is it not worth the extra time?

Risks or costs of entering law school at 27 and graduating at 30? Or even 26 and 29? I am a woman, if that is significant in terms of age (aside from the typical ‘my ovaries are drying up’ stuff). Does the extra time to study for the LSAT outweigh the risk of being a year older? Is 8 months enough for LSAT prep or is 1 year more realistic?

Any opinions would be helpful. Sorry if this sounds scatterbrained. Every time I think I have this all figured and mapped out, something throws a wrench in it and I question everything.

Y’all have been an invaluable resources in considering all of this, so thanks for everything and thanks in advance.


You will receive absolutely zero benefit for your "pre-law journal" and thesis. Staying six years in UG won't matter for law school admissions purposes, but I doubt that you're doing yourself any favors in terms of employment prospects by staying in college for so long should you not elect to go to law school. Feel free to continue spending enormous amounts of your parents' (and/or the government's money) though. How much time you will need for LSAT prep depends on where you start/what your goal is among other things. Generally speaking, 8 months is more than enough to prep for the LSAT.

Monday

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Re: A few questions - mostly about timing.

Postby Monday » Sat Nov 26, 2016 11:28 am

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Last edited by Monday on Wed May 10, 2017 11:11 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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CheyenneGarrett17

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Re: A few questions - mostly about timing.

Postby CheyenneGarrett17 » Sat Nov 26, 2016 5:21 pm

Appreciate the insight from you both, thank you.

Monday wrote:
curry1 wrote:You will receive absolutely zero benefit for your "pre-law journal" and thesis. Staying six years in UG won't matter for law school admissions purposes, but I doubt that you're doing yourself any favors in terms of employment prospects by staying in college for so long should you not elect to go to law school. Feel free to continue spending enormous amounts of your parents' (and/or the government's money) though. How much time you will need for LSAT prep depends on where you start/what your goal is among other things. Generally speaking, 8 months is more than enough to prep for the LSAT.

Ooh, snarky. I do agree with curry, though: the "pre-law journal" does not sound noteworthy enough to justify an extra year in UG (theses also provide negligible weight toward your application). I am curious why you have to take a year off to study for the LSAT after graduation.


I plan on studying for the LSAT after graduation because between working full time, personal/family stress, and trying to drag up my GPA I just don't feel like I would be able to devote the time and energy needed for meaningful study time while in school. I will be studying a bit over breaks from school between now and then (mostly working through the RC Bible and reading a lot of dense material), but plan on doing the bulk of it after graduation when I have more time to devote to it. I will still be working then, but school takes up a lot of my time at the moment - I seem to get more grade crazy each semester.

Sounds like I need to stay on track. Thanks for the reassurance guys. Between being a first-gen going into this totally blind and my academic advisor being absolutely zero help (she told me not to even study for the LSAT because it tests natural ability and I'm already a shoe-in at my school's LS), this is about the only resource I have. Even through the bit of snarkiness - y'all are saving my ass. So thank you.

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A. Nony Mouse

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Re: A few questions - mostly about timing.

Postby A. Nony Mouse » Sat Nov 26, 2016 5:37 pm

If you, personally, want to take the extra time because the activities are important to you, that's totally cool. It's not going to make a difference once way or another for admissions. (Doing the journal/thesis may give you more stuff to talk about in a PS, but may not - it's kind of what you make of it.)

Also, the age thing doesn't matter at all. Probably the most age-conscious employer is biglaw, and biglaw has no problem with 30-y.o.s.

I agree with curry that how long you need to study is going to depend on you and where you start with a diagnostic etc. You may be able to graduate in May 2018 and take the September (and/or December) 2018 LSAT and apply that cycle. It's hard to tell at this point.

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circle.the.wagons

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Re: A few questions - mostly about timing.

Postby circle.the.wagons » Mon Nov 28, 2016 11:36 am

You don't need a year to study for the lsat. I'm working full time and I've been studying for 6 months (taking it Saturday), and I'm about to go crazy. Plus I lost almost 3 weeks of studying bc i moved in October, so I had a lot of shit to deal with. If you want to do 6 I wouldn't argue against it, but a year is way overkill.



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