UK Undergrad Seeking Advice

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shahaaditya92
Posts: 3
Joined: Sun Apr 19, 2015 3:54 pm

UK Undergrad Seeking Advice

Postby shahaaditya92 » Sun Apr 19, 2015 4:11 pm

Hi!

I graduated from the University of Cambridge, UK in 2013, with a 2.i. After which I have spent time working full time, first in the law, in the Chambers of a retired Judge, and currently in Investment banking.

I have been looking to apply to certain law schools that are recognized by the Bar Council of India, as that is where I live and would like the option of coming back to practice here. I've only been familiar with the UK system of education, so this process is a new to me. I was hoping I would get some advice here. The first question relates to the hard numbers, I've not sure how the conversion from the UK degree classification to the US GPA systems works, I've done a little research and got a few differing answers, so any advice on the same would be great! Also, are schools more flexible with GPA of students from non-US undergrad institutions? Second, I've got a 3 month sabbatical from work to prepare for the LSAT, as IBanking hours can be demanding. Would this be sufficient time / any personal tips on preparing for the LSAT outside the numerous blogs written on the same?

I do understand that my questions are broad, but just hoping to get some clarity before getting down to other factors and the individual characteristics of each law school. Also, if it helps, the schools approved by the Bar Council of India are, UPenn, Georgetown, Cornell, UC-B & Fordham, additionally I would also love to apply to Boston College and Northwestern even though they aren't recognized by the Bar Council of India.

Many thanks in advance for help help you may be nice enough to offer. Also, if anyone has questions on Oxford or Cambridge applications do reach out. Cheers, A :)

somepulp
Posts: 6
Joined: Mon Feb 23, 2015 4:54 am

Re: UK Undergrad Seeking Advice

Postby somepulp » Sun Apr 19, 2015 4:46 pm

If you are looking for just info on your undergraduate GPA, keep in mind that your intl GPA will not be converted to another number, just another label of "superior", "above average", "average". Superior is a first class degree. I do believe above average is a (upper) second.

This means that because US law schools cannot report your GPA for ranking, your LSAT will be (others correct me if I'm wrong) the most important factor of your application.

For the LSAT, no one can tell you if 3 months is enough until you have a diagnostic score. If you score in the upper 160s or even 170s as some have for the first time here on TLS, then 3 months is enough, if not more than enough. However, most that I've seen score in the 150s, and some on here take months if not up to a year or more. Keep in mind that after you have a diagnostic score, it really depends on how long you drill and then how much time you have to do prep tests. I would take much more time for LSAT (as I already have) than just 3 months.

How to actually study for LSAT: you need to make sure you have done at least every single question available at least once and every prep test in real conditions. I'm not sure if cambridge lsat still allows pdf downloads, if not get all the books you can. Split them in half and take the first half of prep tests for drilling. Take the next half for prep tests. Before and during drilling, use the Powerscore Bibles and Manhattan LSAT books. 7sage for logic games.

The only online sources that matter for LSAT are: TLS, 7sage, Manhattan forums. I don't really think any other blogs are helpful.

Some questions for you: what did you study at Cambridge? If it was an LLB, just curious, why not get an LLM in the UK? Have you thought of funding? I ask because usually people choose the school giving the most aid, rather than which schools are accredited by bar councils abroad. Can you work for a firm in the US that has offices in India?

Good luck! Let me know if you have any other questions.

CanadianWolf
Posts: 10439
Joined: Wed Mar 24, 2010 4:54 pm

Re: UK Undergrad Seeking Advice

Postby CanadianWolf » Sun Apr 19, 2015 4:57 pm

3 months is plenty of time to prepare for the LSAT. Score in the high 160s & you should have several options (Fordham, Georgetown & Cornell) from among the approved law schools.

Georgetown & Fordham have part-time options. Admission for Georgetown's part-time program is easier than for it's full-time program.

shahaaditya92
Posts: 3
Joined: Sun Apr 19, 2015 3:54 pm

Re: UK Undergrad Seeking Advice

Postby shahaaditya92 » Sun Apr 19, 2015 5:05 pm

somepulp wrote:If you are looking for just info on your undergraduate GPA, keep in mind that your intl GPA will not be converted to another number, just another label of "superior", "above average", "average". Superior is a first class degree. I do believe above average is a (upper) second.

This means that because US law schools cannot report your GPA for ranking, your LSAT will be (others correct me if I'm wrong) the most important factor of your application.

For the LSAT, no one can tell you if 3 months is enough until you have a diagnostic score. If you score in the upper 160s or even 170s as some have for the first time here on TLS, then 3 months is enough, if not more than enough. However, most that I've seen score in the 150s, and some on here take months if not up to a year or more. Keep in mind that after you have a diagnostic score, it really depends on how long you drill and then how much time you have to do prep tests. I would take much more time for LSAT (as I already have) than just 3 months.

How to actually study for LSAT: you need to make sure you have done at least every single question available at least once and every prep test in real conditions. I'm not sure if cambridge lsat still allows pdf downloads, if not get all the books you can. Split them in half and take the first half of prep tests for drilling. Take the next half for prep tests. Before and during drilling, use the Powerscore Bibles and Manhattan LSAT books. 7sage for logic games.

The only online sources that matter for LSAT are: TLS, 7sage, Manhattan forums. I don't really think any other blogs are helpful.

Some questions for you: what did you study at Cambridge? If it was an LLB, just curious, why not get an LLM in the UK? Have you thought of funding? I ask because usually people choose the school giving the most aid, rather than which schools are accredited by bar councils abroad. Can you work for a firm in the US that has offices in India?

Good luck! Let me know if you have any other questions.


Hey! Thanks very much for the response. Lots of good information in there. Interesting that that is the system for the GPA part of the application, it does however make sense, as it isn't exactly comparing apples to apples.

I'll take your advice and take a diagnostic test as soon as I can, based on which hopefully, I can have a clearer idea of prep time. Unfortunately, I think I may only be able to do the October LSAT, as I understand it applying post the December LSAT maybe too late. Will also have a look at 7Sage, the other two I've has a cursory look at.

And as for your questions, I studied Land Economy, which is a mix of Law and Economics, although I did more Econ. The Indian Bar Council requires a 3yr UG degree + 3yr PG law degree, or a straight 5 yr program (offered in India). On funding, I would like to believe I could self fund this, partly through my savings and partly my family assistance. And lastly, the Indian law market isn't liberalized yet, so no foreign firms are actually present in India, however a few have 'best friend' relationships with Indian firm with varying degrees of success.
Thanks for the response again!

shahaaditya92
Posts: 3
Joined: Sun Apr 19, 2015 3:54 pm

Re: UK Undergrad Seeking Advice

Postby shahaaditya92 » Sun Apr 19, 2015 5:07 pm

CanadianWolf wrote:3 months is plenty of time to prepare for the LSAT. Score in the high 160s & you should have several options (Fordham, Georgetown & Cornell) from among the approved law schools.

Georgetown & Fordham have part-time options. Admission for Georgetown's part-time program is easier than for it's full-time program.


Cheers man! Always re-assuring so early in to the process. As for part v full-time, I would honestly only be looking at full-time programs, as you said things will undoubtedly be difficult, not impossible but difficult.




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