LSAT testing violation

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Knp
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LSAT testing violation

Postby Knp » Sat Feb 08, 2014 2:59 pm

I took the LSAT today And received a gold testing violation slip. I accidentally bubbled my last two questions from section 2 in the section one column and the proctor saw me bubbling in the wrong section and gave me a slip. I know I was not supposed to be working in the first section and I wasn't meaning to! My bubbles are simply in the wrong place, and I've left them that way further impacting my score. The proctor also said she thought she saw me flip back to section one which is completely absurd because I had no time to do that. What happens now!? Can I call someone? Is my score going to be trashed? I tried asking the proctor after the test but she would not answer my questions and wanted nothing to do with me.

Kevinlomax
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Re: LSAT testing violation

Postby Kevinlomax » Sat Feb 08, 2014 4:17 pm

it will be reported to LSAC and school's will know you violated the rules

Knp
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Re: LSAT testing violation

Postby Knp » Sat Feb 08, 2014 4:21 pm

But will I still get a score? Do schools even look at applicants with violations?

Knp
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Re: LSAT testing violation

Postby Knp » Sat Feb 08, 2014 4:22 pm

This was my second time taking the test and was looking at top schools, I only even took the test again in the hopes of bumping up my score a few points. Now I feel like my applications are all soiled by a simple mistake.

NYstate
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Re: LSAT testing violation

Postby NYstate » Sat Feb 08, 2014 4:36 pm

I think there is an appeals process. Did you call the LSAC office? or email them? You should at least protest. There are other threads here about this but I don't know the answer.

Does the scantron reflect what you are saying? Like bubbled circles not in the right place?

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patogordo
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Re: LSAT testing violation

Postby patogordo » Sat Feb 08, 2014 4:37 pm

I know I sure believe it

Knp
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Re: LSAT testing violation

Postby Knp » Sat Feb 08, 2014 4:47 pm

I will email them now. I just doubt they will believe me over the proctors, but it's worth a try. The scantron does reflect what I am saying but I'm not sure how to prove to them I never flipped back in the test book, I simply bubbled in the wrong section.

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BelugaWhale
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Re: LSAT testing violation

Postby BelugaWhale » Sat Feb 08, 2014 4:53 pm

Knp wrote:I will email them now. I just doubt they will believe me over the proctors, but it's worth a try. The scantron does reflect what I am saying but I'm not sure how to prove to them I never flipped back in the test book, I simply bubbled in the wrong section.

If you bubbled in the wrong section then the bubbles should reflect the (hopefully) correct answers in the new section. Meaning, if the last few answers to section 1 was A, B, C. And the first few answers to Section 2 was B, B, A. Then hopefully if you got the first 3 questions right in section 2, and you misbubbled in section 1, then LSAC can compare the answers and confirm your version since the section 1 bubbles would reflect the correct section 2 answer choices...does that make sense?

Knp
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Re: LSAT testing violation

Postby Knp » Sat Feb 08, 2014 5:11 pm

It does, but if I didn't get those particular questions right then I could be screwed?

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TheodoreKGB
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Re: LSAT testing violation

Postby TheodoreKGB » Sat Feb 08, 2014 5:32 pm

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Last edited by TheodoreKGB on Sun Mar 15, 2015 11:50 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Knp
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Re: LSAT testing violation

Postby Knp » Sat Feb 08, 2014 5:43 pm

She said she saw me bubble in section one and reading in the book so I must've been reading section one.. I told her I was reading section 2 and bubbling section one, an honest mistake, she wouldn't hear it, said I needed to accept my verbal warning and be more careful. Later I asked if there were consequences and she couldn't answer.

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TheodoreKGB
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Re: LSAT testing violation

Postby TheodoreKGB » Sat Feb 08, 2014 5:46 pm

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Last edited by TheodoreKGB on Sun Mar 15, 2015 11:50 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Nucky
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Re: LSAT testing violation

Postby Nucky » Sat Feb 08, 2014 5:49 pm

Sounds like you had a try-hard proctor. Sorry to hear that. None of that should be a big deal, unless of course you flipped to another section. From my experience and discussions bubbling in unanswered questions after time is commonplace. Maybe you should have been a bit smoother?

Knp
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Re: LSAT testing violation

Postby Knp » Sat Feb 08, 2014 5:56 pm

She said the gold slip is a verbal warning, which is why I'm confused, because the gold slip says a white copy is sent to lsac

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TheodoreKGB
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Re: LSAT testing violation

Postby TheodoreKGB » Sat Feb 08, 2014 6:04 pm

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Last edited by TheodoreKGB on Sun Mar 15, 2015 11:49 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Knp
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Re: LSAT testing violation

Postby Knp » Sat Feb 08, 2014 6:07 pm

Alright so hopefully it can just be resolved then so it's not on my record forever, this is so terrible

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koalacity
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Re: LSAT testing violation

Postby koalacity » Sat Feb 08, 2014 6:37 pm

Nucky wrote:Sounds like you had a try-hard proctor. Sorry to hear that. None of that should be a big deal, unless of course you flipped to another section. From my experience and discussions bubbling in unanswered questions after time is commonplace. Maybe you should have been a bit smoother?

wut
You do know the bolded is a major violation of LSAC testing procedures/rules, right? Please don't convey to future takers that this is just something people do, because getting caught doing so will end very, very poorly.

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A. Nony Mouse
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Re: LSAT testing violation

Postby A. Nony Mouse » Sat Feb 08, 2014 7:49 pm

koalacity wrote:
Nucky wrote:Sounds like you had a try-hard proctor. Sorry to hear that. None of that should be a big deal, unless of course you flipped to another section. From my experience and discussions bubbling in unanswered questions after time is commonplace. Maybe you should have been a bit smoother?

wut
You do know the bolded is a major violation of LSAC testing procedures/rules, right? Please don't convey to future takers that this is just something people do, because getting caught doing so will end very, very poorly.

Absolutely this.

It's also not what OP actually describes doing.

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PepperJack
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Re: LSAT testing violation

Postby PepperJack » Sat Feb 08, 2014 8:04 pm

TheodoreKGB wrote:Sounds like it was not a warning and the proctor will have sent in a detailed account of the violation.
According to official LSAC website:

The Law School Admission Council has established procedures for dealing with instances of possible candidate misconduct or irregularities on the LSAT or in the law school admission process. Misconduct or irregularity in the admission process is a serious offense with serious consequences. Intent is not an element of a finding of misconduct or irregularity. This means that an "honest mistake" is not a defense to a charge of misconduct or irregularity. Misconduct or irregularity is defined as the submission, as part of the law school admission process, including, but not limited to, regular, transfer, and visiting applications, of any information that is false, inconsistent, or misleading, or the omission of information that may result in a false or misleading conclusion, or the violation of any regulation governing the law school admission process, including any violation of LSAT test center regulations.

Examples of misconduct and irregularities include, but are not limited to:

•submission of false, inconsistent, or misleading statements or omission of information requested online or on forms as part of registering for the LSAT or using LSAC's Credential Assembly Service, or on individual law school application forms;
•submission of an altered or a nonauthentic transcript;
•submission of an application containing false, inconsistent, or misleading information;
•submission of an altered, nonauthentic, or unauthorized letter of recommendation;
•falsification of records;
•impersonation of another in taking the LSAT;
•switching of LSAT answer sheets with another;
•taking the LSAT for purposes other than applying to law school;
•copying on, or other forms of cheating on, the LSAT;
•obtaining advance access to test materials;
•theft of test materials;
working on, marking, erasing, reading, or turning pages on sections of the LSAT during unauthorized times;
•bringing prohibited items into the test room;
•falsification of transcript information, school attendance, honors, awards, or employment;
•providing false, inconsistent, or misleading information in the admission and financial aid/scholarship application process; or
•attempt at any of the above.
A charge of misconduct or irregularity may be made prior to a candidate's admission to law school, after matriculation at a law school, or after admission to practice.

When alleged misconduct or irregularity brings into question the validity of the LSAC data about a candidate, the school may be notified of possible data error, and transmission of LSAT scores and academic summary reports will be withheld until the matter has been resolved by the Law School Admission Council's Misconduct and Irregularities in the Admission Process Subcommittee. The Council will investigate all instances of alleged misconduct or irregularities in the admission process in accordance with the LSAC Rules Governing Misconduct and Irregularities in the Admission Process (PDF). A subcommittee representative will determine whether misconduct or an irregularity has occurred. If the subcommittee representative determines that a preponderance of the evidence shows misconduct or irregularity, then a report of the determination is sent to all law schools to which the individual has applied, subsequently applies, or has matriculated. Notation that a misconduct or irregularity report is on file is also included on LSAT and Credential Assembly Service reports to law schools. Such reports are retained indefinitely. More information regarding misconduct and irregularity procedures may be obtained by writing to:

LSAC
Misconduct and Irregularities in the Admission Process Subcommittee
662 Penn Street
Newtown PA 18940-0040
USA

Try to speak with a manager or someone - maybe with legal help. It says that LSAC needn't prove intent, but that could be because proving intent is much harder than proving that an act took place. I don't think it's their objective to take good hardworking kids who made an honest mistake, bend them over and fuck them in the ass. Like a previous bro said, if they're the correct answers to section two they might let it slide.

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Nucky
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Re: LSAT testing violation

Postby Nucky » Sun Feb 09, 2014 3:03 pm

A. Nony Mouse wrote:
koalacity wrote:
Nucky wrote:Sounds like you had a try-hard proctor. Sorry to hear that. None of that should be a big deal, unless of course you flipped to another section. From my experience and discussions bubbling in unanswered questions after time is commonplace. Maybe you should have been a bit smoother?

wut
You do know the bolded is a major violation of LSAC testing procedures/rules, right? Please don't convey to future takers that this is just something people do, because getting caught doing so will end very, very poorly.

Absolutely this.

It's also not what OP actually describes doing.


I'm not advocating it. But to act like it doesn't happen is just silly. No one is going to leave answers unbubbled. Personally I don't think it really matters considering five C's or whatever in a row likely won't get you very far.

But if any future takers are reading this, I agree - don't do it. Keep track of time and bubble in your guesses before time is called. Not worth the risk.

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jk148706
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Re: LSAT testing violation

Postby jk148706 » Sun Feb 09, 2014 4:31 pm

Nucky wrote:
A. Nony Mouse wrote:
koalacity wrote:
Nucky wrote:Sounds like you had a try-hard proctor. Sorry to hear that. None of that should be a big deal, unless of course you flipped to another section. From my experience and discussions bubbling in unanswered questions after time is commonplace. Maybe you should have been a bit smoother?

wut
You do know the bolded is a major violation of LSAC testing procedures/rules, right? Please don't convey to future takers that this is just something people do, because getting caught doing so will end very, very poorly.

Absolutely this.

It's also not what OP actually describes doing.


I'm not advocating it. But to act like it doesn't happen is just silly. No one is going to leave answers unbubbled. Personally I don't think it really matters considering five C's or whatever in a row likely won't get you very far.

But if any future takers are reading this, I agree - don't do it. Keep track of time and bubble in your guesses before time is called. Not worth the risk.


Huh?

When I took in Oct I absolutely left one blank. I simply forgot to bubble an answer, and when I noticed time was called. I knew I had the right answer, but had to lose a point bc I didn't bubble.

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Nucky
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Re: LSAT testing violation

Postby Nucky » Sun Feb 09, 2014 4:38 pm

jk148706 wrote:Huh?

When I took in Oct I absolutely left one blank. I simply forgot to bubble an answer, and when I noticed time was called. I knew I had the right answer, but had to lose a point bc I didn't bubble.


I've never been in that situation, and I am certainly making an assumption in saying what I did, but I can't imagine that is typical. I guess you're just an ethically superior person... Or maybe I am just a pessimist.

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Nucky
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Re: LSAT testing violation

Postby Nucky » Sun Feb 09, 2014 4:41 pm

Anyway, I withdraw. This should be about helping OP through this unfortunate situation. Hope it is resolved favorably. Good luck.

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koalacity
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Re: LSAT testing violation

Postby koalacity » Sun Feb 09, 2014 4:43 pm

Nucky wrote:
A. Nony Mouse wrote:
koalacity wrote:
Nucky wrote:Sounds like you had a try-hard proctor. Sorry to hear that. None of that should be a big deal, unless of course you flipped to another section. From my experience and discussions bubbling in unanswered questions after time is commonplace. Maybe you should have been a bit smoother?

wut
You do know the bolded is a major violation of LSAC testing procedures/rules, right? Please don't convey to future takers that this is just something people do, because getting caught doing so will end very, very poorly.

Absolutely this.

It's also not what OP actually describes doing.


I'm not advocating it. But to act like it doesn't happen is just silly. No one is going to leave answers unbubbled. Personally I don't think it really matters considering five C's or whatever in a row likely won't get you very far.

But if any future takers are reading this, I agree - don't do it. Keep track of time and bubble in your guesses before time is called. Not worth the risk.

Again, wut?

Takers can and do leave answers unbubbled all the time. Please, do not make it seem like it's the norm to cheat by filling in bubbles after time is called. It's not an exaggeration to say that doing so could be a career-ruining decision. Law schools, especially law schools worth attending, are not going to look kindly upon a testing violation.

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Nucky
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Re: LSAT testing violation

Postby Nucky » Sun Feb 09, 2014 6:10 pm

koalacity wrote:Again, wut?

Takers can and do leave answers unbubbled all the time. Please, do not make it seem like it's the norm to cheat by filling in bubbles after time is called. It's not an exaggeration to say that doing so could be a career-ruining decision. Law schools, especially law schools worth attending, are not going to look kindly upon a testing violation.


Please refer to my posts above. Sorry if I upset your sensibilities. Get off your high horse. Are you this pretentious in real life or only on TLS?

No one, including me, is advocating this behavior. As I stated above, I think doing this is easily avoidable if you keep track of time and act accordingly. But I would think neither you, I, or LSAC have data on how often this occurs. Is it right? We would agree it isn't. But does it happen? Does it happen often? Personally, I would guess it does.

Again, maybe I am just a pessimist in my assessment of human nature. I'll admit I may be wrong, and hope I am. But I'd wager I'm not.




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