LoR Content Question

(Applications Advice, Letters of Recommendation . . . )
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Skunky Bumps
Posts: 57
Joined: Tue Jun 28, 2011 10:24 pm

LoR Content Question

Postby Skunky Bumps » Wed Oct 03, 2012 6:40 pm

I've hit the search function a few times to no avail, so feel free to link me to past threads if this is a rehash.

A supervisor from the job I've been at the past few summers will be writing me a recommendation. He responded to my request by asking me what he wants me to emphasize in his letter. What, in your opinion, are the most important points I should ask him to hit on in his letter? I'm getting some academic LoRs as well, so I want him to talk about strong points that wouldn't be as evident to someone I meet with for class twice a week. Thanks.

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Mr. Elshal
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Joined: Thu Sep 20, 2012 11:30 pm

Re: LoR Content Question

Postby Mr. Elshal » Thu Oct 04, 2012 12:17 am

Skunky Bumps wrote:I've hit the search function a few times to no avail, so feel free to link me to past threads if this is a rehash.

A supervisor from the job I've been at the past few summers will be writing me a recommendation. He responded to my request by asking me what he wants me to emphasize in his letter. What, in your opinion, are the most important points I should ask him to hit on in his letter? I'm getting some academic LoRs as well, so I want him to talk about strong points that wouldn't be as evident to someone I meet with for class twice a week. Thanks.



First off, try for the same skills that the LSAT tests. There is, in fact, a reason why law schools consider them (contrary to what many applicants believe). If you performed well on your LSAT, this will provide more support toward you possessing those skills, and if you performed poorly, this may help make up for it.

Second, shoot for points that display your ability to perform research efficiently and effectively, your ability to go above and beyond what has been asked of you (in a good way, not like the person who does too much and ends up spreading havoc throughout the workplace as people try to fix his mistakes), and your dedication to the task at hand.

Third, and finally, ask him to include any other skill sets that you feel accurately describe you and that you believe he can write about anecdotally (not just saying "Skunky Bumps always perseveres. In addition, Skunky Bumps is cool. In conclusion, Skunky Bumps is law school material.")

Good luck with the process!

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North
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Re: LoR Content Question

Postby North » Thu Oct 04, 2012 10:23 am

The Ivey Guide to Law School Admissions wrote:Recommendation Content

Feel free to print this section out for your recommenders if they ask for your input or guidance. Recommenders will need to write one global letter that will work for all the schools you apply to. Here are some typical qualities that law schools care about as they put together an incoming class:  

    • Intellect and native intelligence (your academic horsepower)
    • Academic performance (what you’ve done with that horsepower)
    • Analytical skills and reasoning ability
    • Written communication skills
    • Oral communication skills
    • Independence of thought and creativity
    • Quality of class participation
    • Work ethic and self-discipline
    • Enthusiasm and dedication
    • Character and ethics
    • Maturity and common sense
    • Leadership qualities (can be thought leadership)
    • Potential for the study of law (to the extent they can judge)
    • Resilience, stick-with-it-ness, grit
    • Cooperativeness and concern for others

Similarly, if you have to ask an employer or former employer for a recommendation because you are unable, at this stage in your life, to track down enough professors from your college days, try to pick one who can address the skills that law schools will care about the most. Here are some examples:  

    • Your analytical skills
    • Your writing skills
    • Your speaking skills
    • Your research skills
    • Your attention to detail
    • Your persuasive skills
    • Your problem-solving skills
    • Your presentation and soft skills (the “can we put her in front of employers/clients” test)

Don’t ask your recommender to opine on all of these, just the ones he feels competent to discuss based on his experience with you.




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