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Re: Veterans Thread

Posted: Thu Sep 28, 2017 9:13 pm
by CMac86
jthel08 wrote:
Oh, ok. Thanks! Is there a way to distinguish between the two? Or does the school itself just place it where they want..? Im new to the application and scholarship part of the process. Bare with me... haha


I think somewhere on here I read it all comes down to how the scholarship is worded. If it says anything pertaining to tuition-GI Bill just pays less. If it says something like "Living Expenses, Books, and Fees"-you could pocket the extra.

Re: Veterans Thread

Posted: Thu Sep 28, 2017 9:22 pm
by jthel08
CMac86 wrote:
jthel08 wrote:
Oh, ok. Thanks! Is there a way to distinguish between the two? Or does the school itself just place it where they want..? Im new to the application and scholarship part of the process. Bare with me... haha


I think somewhere on here I read it all comes down to how the scholarship is worded. If it says anything pertaining to tuition-GI Bill just pays less. If it says something like "Living Expenses, Books, and Fees"-you could pocket the extra.


Awesome! Thanks!

Re: Veterans Thread

Posted: Mon Oct 02, 2017 12:58 pm
by modernoblomov
It's great to see threads like this exist. I'm curious what it's been like studying for the LSAT for those on active duty. What was your study schedule like? Was it done on shore or sea duty? For how many months?

I'm especially curious for Navy linguists. Where did you fit in time to study? From what I'm hearing, it sounds like a 8/9-5 desk job more or less. I'd imagine there's time in the evenings to study but I also understand how naive it is to expect this given that it's the military.

Any input would be appreciated, thanks.

Re: Veterans Thread

Posted: Mon Oct 02, 2017 1:31 pm
by nubcs
modernoblomov wrote:It's great to see threads like this exist. I'm curious what it's been like studying for the LSAT for those on active duty. What was your study schedule like? Was it done on shore or sea duty? For how many months?

I'm especially curious for Navy linguists. Where did you fit in time to study? From what I'm hearing, it sounds like a 8/9-5 desk job more or less. I'd imagine there's time in the evenings to study but I also understand how naive it is to expect this given that it's the military.

Any input would be appreciated, thanks.


I studied and took the LSAT while on AD. I was on shore duty where we were doing rotating shift work, so the hours were slightly wonky but it ended up translating to about 50 hrs/wk. I studied for a few months, starting off with Mike's LSAT Trainer and doing 2 hours a day after work, and larger chunks during weekends. Once I got the basics down, I ran through I think the 20 most recent PTs under test conditions, and reviewed my mistakes using a combination of 7Sage's LG solutions, LSAThacks.com solutions, and Manhattan Prep's forum for LR/RC solutions. I burned some leave to make time to study as I got nearer to exam day, and I also used some around the time I took the LSAT to adjust my sleep cycle back to normal and ensure I wasn't going to be working on the day of the exam. It definitely sucked, and it cuts into whatever social life you'd expect to have while on shore duty, but it ended up being worth it. Let me know if you want any more specifics.

Re: Veterans Thread

Posted: Mon Oct 02, 2017 1:49 pm
by AJordan
I'm a bit confused. Are you saying that studying sounds like an 8-5/9-5 desk job? That was very far from my experience. I put about 160 hours total study into the LSAT and I don't think I ever did more than ten hours in one week. Who's telling you that you need to be studying 8 hours a day? There's a finite amount of material. If you start going that hard that fast you're probably hurting yourself in the long run.

Re: Veterans Thread

Posted: Mon Oct 02, 2017 3:43 pm
by ddevich
AJordan wrote:I'm a bit confused. Are you saying that studying sounds like an 8-5/9-5 desk job? That was very far from my experience. I put about 160 hours total study into the LSAT and I don't think I ever did more than ten hours in one week. Who's telling you that you need to be studying 8 hours a day? There's a finite amount of material. If you start going that hard that fast you're probably hurting yourself in the long run.


He didn't mean that studying for 8 hours a day is the norm, nor was it the desk job he was referring to. He most likely isn't in the Navy, at least not yet, and wants to know the average day for a Navy Linguist so that he can plan how he'll study around that.

I'm an Army guy, wouldn't know starboard from the stern in truth, so I have no clue about Navy experiences.

Re: Veterans Thread

Posted: Mon Oct 02, 2017 3:52 pm
by AJordan
ddevich wrote:
AJordan wrote:I'm a bit confused. Are you saying that studying sounds like an 8-5/9-5 desk job? That was very far from my experience. I put about 160 hours total study into the LSAT and I don't think I ever did more than ten hours in one week. Who's telling you that you need to be studying 8 hours a day? There's a finite amount of material. If you start going that hard that fast you're probably hurting yourself in the long run.


He didn't mean that studying for 8 hours a day is the norm, nor was it the desk job he was referring to. He most likely isn't in the Navy, at least not yet, and wants to know the average day for a Navy Linguist so that he can plan how he'll study around that.

I'm an Army guy, wouldn't know starboard from the stern in truth, so I have no clue about Navy experiences.


Oh, wow. Yeah that makes sense. I'd be surprised if a single enlisted SM came in and said that he/she couldn't find an hour a day to study for the LSAT for a few months.

Re: Veterans Thread

Posted: Tue Oct 03, 2017 6:49 am
by CMac86
modernoblomov wrote:It's great to see threads like this exist. I'm curious what it's been like studying for the LSAT for those on active duty. What was your study schedule like? Was it done on shore or sea duty? For how many months?

I'm especially curious for Navy linguists. Where did you fit in time to study? From what I'm hearing, it sounds like a 8/9-5 desk job more or less. I'd imagine there's time in the evenings to study but I also understand how naive it is to expect this given that it's the military.

Any input would be appreciated, thanks.


I did. I'm on permo-shore duty (musician, not world-wide deployable for medical reasons). My schedule varies from 8-4 to being 1500-0100. In other words, I don't have a consistent schedule. The only complicating factor for me is that I'm also completing undergrad.

For my first take (underperformed at a 156, PT average was 160-162). I'd get about 90mins before I went to work, did homework for about half of my lunch, and then afterwork (if I was working an 8-4 type of day) I'd get at least 2-3 more hours of LSAT or homework. Work is busier this year than it was last, so I'm hoping that we will start to slow down a bit so I can ramp my prep back up for either a February or June test.

Re: Veterans Thread

Posted: Tue Oct 10, 2017 8:37 pm
by NavyNuke
Anyone attended a penn law military day visit? Got the invite today. I get off of leave a few days before the event, and am wondering if it is worth the trouble to try and get more time off to run up there. I really like Penn. They are a reach for me though. Thanks!

Re: Veterans Thread

Posted: Tue Oct 10, 2017 10:04 pm
by nubcs
NavyNuke wrote:Anyone attended a penn law military day visit? Got the invite today. I get off of leave a few days before the event, and am wondering if it is worth the trouble to try and get more time off to run up there. I really like Penn. They are a reach for me though. Thanks!


I went last year, and it was a huge help. One, the Penn Law vets association is probably the best one I've interacted with, and they're all very willing to help you get to where you want to go, regardless of where you end up applying. The other big takeaway was it helped me understand what I wanted to talk about in my personal statements and interviews.

Also, if you're looking to apply to Penn, they seem pretty big on writing a Why Penn statement, and the visit will probably help you.

Re: Veterans Thread

Posted: Tue Oct 10, 2017 10:17 pm
by NavyNuke
nubcs wrote:
NavyNuke wrote:Anyone attended a penn law military day visit? Got the invite today. I get off of leave a few days before the event, and am wondering if it is worth the trouble to try and get more time off to run up there. I really like Penn. They are a reach for me though. Thanks!


I went last year, and it was a huge help. One, the Penn Law vets association is probably the best one I've interacted with, and they're all very willing to help you get to where you want to go, regardless of where you end up applying. The other big takeaway was it helped me understand what I wanted to talk about in my personal statements and interviews.

Also, if you're looking to apply to Penn, they seem pretty big on writing a Why Penn statement, and the visit will probably help you.


Awesome! Thanks for the response.

Re: Veterans Thread

Posted: Sat Oct 14, 2017 10:04 am
by jthel08
Does anyone have experience with Voc Rehab and the employment process or at least know what it consists of? How does it work once graduating, ETC...?

Re: Veterans Thread

Posted: Wed Oct 18, 2017 10:09 pm
by laqueredup
NavyNuke wrote:
nubcs wrote:
NavyNuke wrote:Anyone attended a penn law military day visit? Got the invite today. I get off of leave a few days before the event, and am wondering if it is worth the trouble to try and get more time off to run up there. I really like Penn. They are a reach for me though. Thanks!


I went last year, and it was a huge help. One, the Penn Law vets association is probably the best one I've interacted with, and they're all very willing to help you get to where you want to go, regardless of where you end up applying. The other big takeaway was it helped me understand what I wanted to talk about in my personal statements and interviews.

Also, if you're looking to apply to Penn, they seem pretty big on writing a Why Penn statement, and the visit will probably help you.


Awesome! Thanks for the response.


Seconded,
It was an awesome visit, and a great community.It gave me plenty of ammo to write a solid why Penn, which I think was a huge part of the reason I was admitted with a sub-par ugpa.

Re: Veterans Thread

Posted: Wed Oct 18, 2017 10:13 pm
by laqueredup
KPUSN07 wrote:Seriously annoying that BC and BU don't offer more $$$....


I ran into this last year because I was targeting Boston specifically and didn't get into H. When I threw out the fact that a few of the lower T14 I was admitted to had better YRP, they both offered merit scholarships to cover the rest.

Re: Veterans Thread

Posted: Fri Oct 27, 2017 4:01 pm
by Llewellyon
Does anyone know how schools view GI Bill users when it comes to scholarship money? I want to go to Georgetown, but with the GI Bill/low DC housing allowance, I'm looking at a monthly budget of about $300 after housing if I want to live on-campus, which is WAY too low. It's pretty annoying when other schools (Harvard, for instance) would allow me a budget of over $1000/month living on-campus, since the housing allowance is much higher and the cost of living lower.

Re: Veterans Thread

Posted: Fri Oct 27, 2017 4:37 pm
by AJordan
Llewellyon wrote:Does anyone know how schools view GI Bill users when it comes to scholarship money? I want to go to Georgetown, but with the GI Bill/low DC housing allowance, I'm looking at a monthly budget of about $300 after housing if I want to live on-campus, which is WAY too low. It's pretty annoying when other schools (Harvard, for instance) would allow me a budget of over $1000/month living on-campus, since the housing allowance is much higher and the cost of living lower.


I don't have my own personal experience so take this for what it's worth. Economically private schools are already guaranteeing you a "scholarship" by participating in the yellow ribbon program, which Georgetown, to its credit, does to full extent. Most people who attend on the GI Bill likely just don't ask their schools for more money. Why not just call them and ask them? Especially if you're over medians you have some real leverage in asking the question. Additionally, you might have some more success with a school like UVA who doesn't need to participate in YRP and has a sympathetic Dean. Economically that just makes sense. For excess scholarship negotiation/classification (GI Bill is "last payer") you're not in a much different boat from other students from what I gather. Read the 509, see where you are in relationship to other folks getting money, if you're competitive for more than YRP is already providing then there's certainly no shame in asking for it.

Re: Veterans Thread

Posted: Fri Oct 27, 2017 4:44 pm
by Dcc617
It’s also been discussed in this thread before. You should be able to find some details if you search.

Re: Veterans Thread

Posted: Mon Oct 30, 2017 1:05 am
by sodomojo
Shot in the dark here - anyone here been stationed in Germany and knowledgeable about sports cars? In need of some car buying advice.

Re: Veterans Thread

Posted: Mon Oct 30, 2017 9:51 am
by Wipfelder
sodomojo wrote:Shot in the dark here - anyone here been stationed in Germany and knowledgeable about sports cars? In need of some car buying advice.


Yup! PM me.

Re: Veterans Thread

Posted: Tue Oct 31, 2017 11:39 pm
by navylawhopeful
Has anyone stayed on as a drilling reservist during law school? I'm separating in about six months and toying with the idea of balancing Reserves/school. Would love to connect with anyone who has done it

Re: Veterans Thread

Posted: Wed Nov 01, 2017 5:38 am
by AJordan
navylawhopeful wrote:Has anyone stayed on as a drilling reservist during law school? I'm separating in about six months and toying with the idea of balancing Reserves/school. Would love to connect with anyone who has done it


I'm curious about this as well, specifically as it relates to summer active training against an SA position's requirements

Re: Veterans Thread

Posted: Fri Nov 03, 2017 1:09 pm
by Whidbey
Long time lurker, first time poster. Thought I'd introduce myself since I keep coming back to this forum and thread. Thanks to all posters especially MT Cicero for keeping that spreadsheet.

About me. 3.33 Political Science from Washington State University, 157 when I took the LSAT back in 1998 on fairly minimal prep. Single, no kids. 41 years old and just passed the 50 point mark in my 20th year to qualify for my reserve retirement (I miss you already, Tricare Reserve select). Did 11 years active, 9 in the reserves. Navy OCS, EA-6B, T-45, C-40 pilot. Typical instructor quals, combat deployments and decorations. I've got the GI bill (actually paid the 100 bucks a month into the old one when back when I joined in 1998). Also have a service connected disability rating in excess of 20%.

I've been flying at a major airline for the last 7 years and now have the seniority to bid short trips, drop, and trade my schedule in order to attend Law school (or to just travel and surf). Continuing my airline career in a priority as it truly is a dream job. Great pay, great flexibility, and great time off. Believe it or not I do know several guys who have done law school while flying for an airline.

Because of my ties to Seattle and the northwest, it looks like Seattle U or bust as I don't have the grades for UW. My airline has major hubs in Seattle, LA, NYC, Atlanta, Minneapolis, and Salt Lake. I'd say that I might consider bidding to a different base but I just don't see having the numbers to get into a program that would justify leaving the beautiful Pacific Northwest, especially given that this is where I'd want to practice.

So you're probably asking, why is this fool thinking about law school? My old man wanted to fly jets but was colorblind, so he joined the Army Reserves and went to law school instead. He's had a fantastic legal career as a JAG in the reserves, a great private practice, and is currently serving as a judge. I saw first hand how he was able to leverage a legal education into helping people and serving the community. Sounds cheesy I'm sure and I'm not trying to write a personal statement on here, just saying how proud I am of what my dad was able to do.

When I graduated college an eternity ago I applied and was accepted to Gonazaga law, but also passed the flight physical and got my pilot slot at OCS. All the guys in my dad's firm at the time said go fly jets, you can always come back and do law school later. Well here I am, still thinking law school is something I'd enjoy, and that in spite of all the negativity on this forum (not this thread), It's worth pursuing.

A few questions... Any insight on what I'd need to to (other than the obvious of putting in the work through the next 9 months on LSAT prep) to be a strong applicant to Seattle U? Also, they have a limited number of yellow ribbon slots, and they say they are first come first serve. Anyone know how many semesters you'd likely have to knock out before being covered by yellow ribbon?

I'm inviting any and all spears to my plans.

I'd also like to offer my assistance to anyone interested in pursuing flying, whether civilian or military. If I had a nickle for every person who said "I always wanted to do that." I've mentored a number of people into civilian flying, active duty flying gigs, and also towards guard and reserve flying gigs, which will give age waivers.

Thanks all.

Whidbey

Re: Veterans Thread

Posted: Fri Nov 03, 2017 1:13 pm
by Wipfelder
Whidbey wrote:Long time lurker, first time poster. Thought I'd introduce myself since I keep coming back to this forum and thread. Thanks to all posters especially MT Cicero for keeping that spreadsheet.

About me. 3.33 Political Science from Washington State University, 157 when I took the LSAT back in 1998 on fairly minimal prep. Single, no kids. 41 years old and just passed the 50 point mark in my 20th year to qualify for my reserve retirement (I miss you already, Tricare Reserve select). Did 11 years active, 9 in the reserves. Navy OCS, EA-6B, T-45, C-40 pilot. Typical instructor quals, combat deployments and decorations. I've got the GI bill (actually paid the 100 bucks a month into the old one when back when I joined in 1998). Also have a service connected disability rating in excess of 20%.

I've been flying at a major airline for the last 7 years and now have the seniority to bid short trips, drop, and trade my schedule in order to attend Law school (or to just travel and surf). Continuing my airline career in a priority as it truly is a dream job. Great pay, great flexibility, and great time off. Believe it or not I do know several guys who have done law school while flying for an airline.

Because of my ties to Seattle and the northwest, it looks like Seattle U or bust as I don't have the grades for UW. My airline has major hubs in Seattle, LA, NYC, Atlanta, Minneapolis, and Salt Lake. I'd say that I might consider bidding to a different base but I just don't see having the numbers to get into a program that would justify leaving the beautiful Pacific Northwest, especially given that this is where I'd want to practice.

So you're probably asking, why is this fool thinking about law school? My old man wanted to fly jets but was colorblind, so he joined the Army Reserves and went to law school instead. He's had a fantastic legal career as a JAG in the reserves, a great private practice, and is currently serving as a judge. I saw first hand how he was able to leverage a legal education into helping people and serving the community. Sounds cheesy I'm sure and I'm not trying to write a personal statement on here, just saying how proud I am of what my dad was able to do.

When I graduated college an eternity ago I applied and was accepted to Gonazaga law, but also passed the flight physical and got my pilot slot at OCS. All the guys in my dad's firm at the time said go fly jets, you can always come back and do law school later. Well here I am, still thinking law school is something I'd enjoy, and that in spite of all the negativity on this forum (not this thread), It's worth pursuing.

A few questions... Any insight on what I'd need to to (other than the obvious of putting in the work through the next 9 months on LSAT prep) to be a strong applicant to Seattle U? Also, they have a limited number of yellow ribbon slots, and they say they are first come first serve. Anyone know how many semesters you'd likely have to knock out before being covered by yellow ribbon?

I'm inviting any and all spears to my plans.

I'd also like to offer my assistance to anyone interested in pursuing flying, whether civilian or military. If I had a nickle for every person who said "I always wanted to do that." I've mentored a number of people into civilian flying, active duty flying gigs, and also towards guard and reserve flying gigs, which will give age waivers.

Thanks all.

Whidbey


If you score well on the LSAT, you will be very competitive for UW. There are very few schools you won't be competitive for, actually. UW is a very achievable goal.

Re: Veterans Thread

Posted: Fri Nov 03, 2017 1:25 pm
by MichiganHoosier
Whidbey wrote:Long time lurker, first time poster. Thought I'd introduce myself since I keep coming back to this forum and thread. Thanks to all posters especially MT Cicero for keeping that spreadsheet.

About me. 3.33 Political Science from Washington State University, 157 when I took the LSAT back in 1998 on fairly minimal prep. Single, no kids. 41 years old and just passed the 50 point mark in my 20th year to qualify for my reserve retirement (I miss you already, Tricare Reserve select). Did 11 years active, 9 in the reserves. Navy OCS, EA-6B, T-45, C-40 pilot. Typical instructor quals, combat deployments and decorations. I've got the GI bill (actually paid the 100 bucks a month into the old one when back when I joined in 1998). Also have a service connected disability rating in excess of 20%.

I've been flying at a major airline for the last 7 years and now have the seniority to bid short trips, drop, and trade my schedule in order to attend Law school (or to just travel and surf). Continuing my airline career in a priority as it truly is a dream job. Great pay, great flexibility, and great time off. Believe it or not I do know several guys who have done law school while flying for an airline.

Because of my ties to Seattle and the northwest, it looks like Seattle U or bust as I don't have the grades for UW. My airline has major hubs in Seattle, LA, NYC, Atlanta, Minneapolis, and Salt Lake. I'd say that I might consider bidding to a different base but I just don't see having the numbers to get into a program that would justify leaving the beautiful Pacific Northwest, especially given that this is where I'd want to practice.

So you're probably asking, why is this fool thinking about law school? My old man wanted to fly jets but was colorblind, so he joined the Army Reserves and went to law school instead. He's had a fantastic legal career as a JAG in the reserves, a great private practice, and is currently serving as a judge. I saw first hand how he was able to leverage a legal education into helping people and serving the community. Sounds cheesy I'm sure and I'm not trying to write a personal statement on here, just saying how proud I am of what my dad was able to do.

When I graduated college an eternity ago I applied and was accepted to Gonazaga law, but also passed the flight physical and got my pilot slot at OCS. All the guys in my dad's firm at the time said go fly jets, you can always come back and do law school later. Well here I am, still thinking law school is something I'd enjoy, and that in spite of all the negativity on this forum (not this thread), It's worth pursuing.

A few questions... Any insight on what I'd need to to (other than the obvious of putting in the work through the next 9 months on LSAT prep) to be a strong applicant to Seattle U? Also, they have a limited number of yellow ribbon slots, and they say they are first come first serve. Anyone know how many semesters you'd likely have to knock out before being covered by yellow ribbon?

I'm inviting any and all spears to my plans.

I'd also like to offer my assistance to anyone interested in pursuing flying, whether civilian or military. If I had a nickle for every person who said "I always wanted to do that." I've mentored a number of people into civilian flying, active duty flying gigs, and also towards guard and reserve flying gigs, which will give age waivers.

Thanks all.

Whidbey


So I'm still active duty and not in law school yet, so I probably can't hit all of your points, but I'll try a few. You need a new LSAT, and by no means will a 3.3 keep you out of UW if that is really where you want to go. I would say study hard and stay dedicated, and set your sights higher than Seattle U. It meets your goals I suppose, but with your experience and financial opportunity (100% GI Bill) don't settle. I would say to even shoot for T14, but if you want to stay in the NW, UW will be great.

As far as prep goes, I would advise getting Mike Kim's LSAT Trainer (and recommended prep tests) to start off. It really gives you a solid base that you can build off of once you finish his program, and it is not by any means too advanced for someone trying to figure out how this crazy test works. I find his writing style very personable and intimate, and it is as engaging of a read as you can get from an LSAT book.

I imagine you'll get some great advice from the brilliant people on this thread. Good luck with everything and feel free to PM me with some suggestions for studying (since I feel I have asked most people on this thread how they got the scores they got).

Re: Veterans Thread

Posted: Fri Nov 03, 2017 1:31 pm
by Wipfelder
MichiganHoosier wrote:
Whidbey wrote:Long time lurker, first time poster. Thought I'd introduce myself since I keep coming back to this forum and thread. Thanks to all posters especially MT Cicero for keeping that spreadsheet.

About me. 3.33 Political Science from Washington State University, 157 when I took the LSAT back in 1998 on fairly minimal prep. Single, no kids. 41 years old and just passed the 50 point mark in my 20th year to qualify for my reserve retirement (I miss you already, Tricare Reserve select). Did 11 years active, 9 in the reserves. Navy OCS, EA-6B, T-45, C-40 pilot. Typical instructor quals, combat deployments and decorations. I've got the GI bill (actually paid the 100 bucks a month into the old one when back when I joined in 1998). Also have a service connected disability rating in excess of 20%.

I've been flying at a major airline for the last 7 years and now have the seniority to bid short trips, drop, and trade my schedule in order to attend Law school (or to just travel and surf). Continuing my airline career in a priority as it truly is a dream job. Great pay, great flexibility, and great time off. Believe it or not I do know several guys who have done law school while flying for an airline.

Because of my ties to Seattle and the northwest, it looks like Seattle U or bust as I don't have the grades for UW. My airline has major hubs in Seattle, LA, NYC, Atlanta, Minneapolis, and Salt Lake. I'd say that I might consider bidding to a different base but I just don't see having the numbers to get into a program that would justify leaving the beautiful Pacific Northwest, especially given that this is where I'd want to practice.

So you're probably asking, why is this fool thinking about law school? My old man wanted to fly jets but was colorblind, so he joined the Army Reserves and went to law school instead. He's had a fantastic legal career as a JAG in the reserves, a great private practice, and is currently serving as a judge. I saw first hand how he was able to leverage a legal education into helping people and serving the community. Sounds cheesy I'm sure and I'm not trying to write a personal statement on here, just saying how proud I am of what my dad was able to do.

When I graduated college an eternity ago I applied and was accepted to Gonazaga law, but also passed the flight physical and got my pilot slot at OCS. All the guys in my dad's firm at the time said go fly jets, you can always come back and do law school later. Well here I am, still thinking law school is something I'd enjoy, and that in spite of all the negativity on this forum (not this thread), It's worth pursuing.

A few questions... Any insight on what I'd need to to (other than the obvious of putting in the work through the next 9 months on LSAT prep) to be a strong applicant to Seattle U? Also, they have a limited number of yellow ribbon slots, and they say they are first come first serve. Anyone know how many semesters you'd likely have to knock out before being covered by yellow ribbon?

I'm inviting any and all spears to my plans.

I'd also like to offer my assistance to anyone interested in pursuing flying, whether civilian or military. If I had a nickle for every person who said "I always wanted to do that." I've mentored a number of people into civilian flying, active duty flying gigs, and also towards guard and reserve flying gigs, which will give age waivers.

Thanks all.

Whidbey


So I'm still active duty and not in law school yet, so I probably can't hit all of your points, but I'll try a few. You need a new LSAT, and by no means will a 3.3 keep you out of UW if that is really where you want to go. I would say study hard and stay dedicated, and set your sights higher than Seattle U. It meets your goals I suppose, but with your experience and financial opportunity (100% GI Bill) don't settle. I would say to even shoot for T14, but if you want to stay in the NW, UW will be great.

As far as prep goes, I would advise getting Mike Kim's LSAT Trainer (and recommended prep tests) to start off. It really gives you a solid base that you can build off of once you finish his program, and it is not by any means too advanced for someone trying to figure out how this crazy test works. I find his writing style very personable and intimate, and it is as engaging of a read as you can get from an LSAT book.

I imagine you'll get some great advice from the brilliant people on this thread. Good luck with everything and feel free to PM me with some suggestions for studying (since I feel I have asked most people on this thread how they got the scores they got).


And if you sign up with Service to School, you get a sweet discount on Manhattan Prep's LSAT course.