Are admission consultants worth the money?

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glitched
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Re: Are admission consultants worth the money?

Postby glitched » Mon Jun 13, 2011 1:37 am

glitched wrote:yes

+1

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Lawquacious
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Re: Are admission consultants worth the money?

Postby Lawquacious » Mon Jun 13, 2011 1:40 am

If the consultant has actually worked in the admissions office at a top school you particularly want to go to (such as having been an admissions dean at Harvard Law), and money is not particularly an issue, then I think the consultant might not be such a bad idea. In that case you may be dealing with someone who has truly inside knowledge or even ongoing inside connections. Even then, your success with the process will still pretty much will come down to your GPA and LSAT, and you could probably glean most or all info such an individual would likely give you from TLS or other commercially available law admissions materials.

But I'm actually not as quick as most ITT to say that such a service is necessarily unhelpful or not worth it, even if the above special conditions don't apply. Reading through books or threads and threads of TLS isn't necessarily as helpful as having someone already very knowledgeable about law admissions work one on one with the applicant in person. But that is assuming it is someone who really knows the process (which many admission consultants probably don't, at least in a sufficiently nuanced way), and that they don't charge an arm and a leg (which most consultants probably do).
Last edited by Lawquacious on Mon Jun 13, 2011 11:49 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Lawquacious
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Re: Are admission consultants worth the money?

Postby Lawquacious » Mon Jun 13, 2011 1:41 am

glitched wrote:
glitched wrote:yes

+1



Lol. WTF :lol:

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DMBFan
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Re: Are admission consultants worth the money?

Postby DMBFan » Mon Jun 13, 2011 1:52 am

Lawquacious wrote:If the consultant has actually worked is actually working in the admissions office at a top school you particularly want to go to (such as having been an being the admissions dean at Harvard Law)...


Fixed.

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Yeags
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Re: Are admission consultants worth the money?

Postby Yeags » Mon Jun 13, 2011 1:53 am

haha great!! you guys are funny. I don't think I could afford to hire a guy who actually worked on the admission staff at some prominent law school anyways, they probably cost an arm and a leg or only work with special cases. I've met a ton of parents whose life goal is to send their kids to Stanford or some Ivy, and since my large public high school offered zero counseling services, they mostly turned to private counselors. I was pretty surprised when I found out too.

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jdMission
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Re: Are admission consultants worth the money?

Postby jdMission » Mon Jun 13, 2011 3:47 am

No one can deny that your LSAT score and undergraduate GPA (and graduate GPA, as the case may be) are two of the most important factors with regard to which law schools may grant you admittance, but they are not the only ones that matter. You need to spend a good deal of time on your complete application, including your resume, your essays and your letters of recommendation. Why? Because these additional elements of the application provide a more complete picture of you as an applicant—and can truly make the difference between being accepted and being rejected. This is where an admissions consultant can really help.

Your essay may demonstrate your strong writing abilities, even if your GPA is not as strong as you would like it to be. A detailed resume can demonstrate to the admissions committee that you would add diversity to an entering class that would not be the same without someone like you. Letters of recommendations can demonstrate your strong capacity to succeed in law school, even if your LSAT scores may not be stellar.

Don’t discount any element of the application process. Law schools continue to ask for a variety of elements for a reason—to get a complete sense of you as a candidate. Be your best advocate.

Sunitha Ramaiah
Co-Founder of New York Law School

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Jack Smirks
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Re: Are admission consultants worth the money?

Postby Jack Smirks » Mon Jun 13, 2011 3:56 am

jdMission wrote:No one can deny that your LSAT score and undergraduate GPA (and graduate GPA, as the case may be) are two of the most important factors with regard to which law schools may grant you admittance, but they are not the only ones that matter. You need to spend a good deal of time on your complete application, including your resume, your essays and your letters of recommendation. Why? Because these additional elements of the application provide a more complete picture of you as an applicant—and can truly make the difference between being accepted and being rejected. This is where an admissions consultant can really help.

Your essay may demonstrate your strong writing abilities, even if your GPA is not as strong as you would like it to be. A detailed resume can demonstrate to the admissions committee that you would add diversity to an entering class that would not be the same without someone like you. Letters of recommendations can demonstrate your strong capacity to succeed in law school, even if your LSAT scores may not be stellar.

Don’t discount any element of the application process. Law schools continue to ask for a variety of elements for a reason—to get a complete sense of you as a candidate. Be your best advocate.

Sunitha Ramaiah
Co-Founder and Consultant jdMission

No

WayBryson
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Re: Are admission consultants worth the money?

Postby WayBryson » Mon Jun 13, 2011 5:11 am

DMBFan wrote:
Lawquacious wrote:If the consultant has actually worked is actually working in the admissions office at a top school you particularly want to go to (such as having been an being the admissions dean at Harvard Law)...


Fixed.


And the people who are "actually working in the admissions office" at top schools happen to give their advice out for free:

http://blogs.law.yale.edu/blogs/admissions/default.aspx

You'll find similar, if less entertaining, blogs from Michigan, Stanford, and the list goes on.

071816
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Re: Are admission consultants worth the money?

Postby 071816 » Mon Jun 13, 2011 5:51 am

jdMission wrote:No one can deny that your LSAT score and undergraduate GPA (and graduate GPA, as the case may be) are two of the most important factors with regard to which law schools may grant you admittance, but they are not the only ones that matter. You need to spend a good deal of time on your complete application, including your resume, your essays and your letters of recommendation. Why? Because these additional elements of the application provide a more complete picture of you as an applicant—and can truly make the difference between being accepted and being rejected. This is where an admissions consultant can really help.

Your essay may demonstrate your strong writing abilities, even if your GPA is not as strong as you would like it to be. A detailed resume can demonstrate to the admissions committee that you would add diversity to an entering class that would not be the same without someone like you. Letters of recommendations can demonstrate your strong capacity to succeed in law school, even if your LSAT scores may not be stellar.

Don’t discount any element of the application process. Law schools continue to ask for a variety of elements for a reason—to get a complete sense of you as a candidate. Be your best advocate.

Sunitha Ramaiah
Co-Founder and Consultant jdMission


that was a pretty shameless plug. I would ignore the above post.

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NYC Law
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Re: Are admission consultants worth the money?

Postby NYC Law » Mon Jun 13, 2011 7:20 am

lol no

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Grizz
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Re: Are admission consultants worth the money?

Postby Grizz » Mon Jun 13, 2011 7:39 am

jdMission wrote:No one can deny that your LSAT score and undergraduate GPA (and graduate GPA, as the case may be) are two of the most important factors with regard to which law schools may grant you admittance, but they are not the only ones that matter. You need to spend a good deal of time on your complete application, including your resume, your essays and your letters of recommendation. Why? Because these additional elements of the application provide a more complete picture of you as an applicant—and can truly make the difference between being accepted and being rejected. This is where an admissions consultant can really help.

Your essay may demonstrate your strong writing abilities, even if your GPA is not as strong as you would like it to be. A detailed resume can demonstrate to the admissions committee that you would add diversity to an entering class that would not be the same without someone like you. Letters of recommendations can demonstrate your strong capacity to succeed in law school, even if your LSAT scores may not be stellar.

Don’t discount any element of the application process. Law schools continue to ask for a variety of elements for a reason—to get a complete sense of you as a candidate. Be your best advocate.

Sunitha Ramaiah
Co-Founder and Consultant jdMission


mmkay, but I still wouldn't gen an admissions consultant

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soj
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Re: Are admission consultants worth the money?

Postby soj » Mon Jun 13, 2011 9:12 am

jdMission wrote:No one can deny that your LSAT score and undergraduate GPA (and graduate GPA, as the case may be) are two of the most important factors with regard to which law schools may grant you admittance, but they are not the only ones that matter. You need to spend a good deal of time on your complete application, including your resume, your essays and your letters of recommendation. Why? Because these additional elements of the application provide a more complete picture of you as an applicant—and can truly make the difference between being accepted and being rejected. This is where an admissions consultant can really help.

Your essay may demonstrate your strong writing abilities, even if your GPA is not as strong as you would like it to be. A detailed resume can demonstrate to the admissions committee that you would add diversity to an entering class that would not be the same without someone like you. Letters of recommendations can demonstrate your strong capacity to succeed in law school, even if your LSAT scores may not be stellar.

Don’t discount any element of the application process. Law schools continue to ask for a variety of elements for a reason—to get a complete sense of you as a candidate. Be your best advocate.

Sunitha Ramaiah
Co-Founder and Consultant jdMission

:lol:

Thank you for making the thread 25% better.

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Kilpatrick
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Re: Are admission consultants worth the money?

Postby Kilpatrick » Mon Jun 13, 2011 9:17 am

jdMission wrote:No one can deny that your LSAT score and undergraduate GPA (and graduate GPA, as the case may be) are two of the most important factors with regard to which law schools may grant you admittance, but they are not the only ones that matter. You need to spend a good deal of time on your complete application, including your resume, your essays and your letters of recommendation. Why? Because these additional elements of the application provide a more complete picture of you as an applicant—and can truly make the difference between being accepted and being rejected. This is where an admissions consultant can really help.

Your essay may demonstrate your strong writing abilities, even if your GPA is not as strong as you would like it to be. A detailed resume can demonstrate to the admissions committee that you would add diversity to an entering class that would not be the same without someone like you. Letters of recommendations can demonstrate your strong capacity to succeed in law school, even if your LSAT scores may not be stellar.

Don’t discount any element of the application process. Law schools continue to ask for a variety of elements for a reason—to get a complete sense of you as a candidate. Be your best advocate.

Sunitha Ramaiah
Co-Founder and Consultant jdMission


:lol:

OP here is your evidence that you shouldn't hire an admissions consultant. They don't know anything.

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nphsbuckeye
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Re: Are admission consultants worth the money?

Postby nphsbuckeye » Mon Jun 13, 2011 10:38 am

Maybe. For business school.

CanadianWolf
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Re: Are admission consultants worth the money?

Postby CanadianWolf » Mon Jun 13, 2011 10:44 am

OP: Try asking: "For those who have used an admissions consultant for law school admissions, what was your experience ?"


Comparing law school admissions to elite undergraduate admissions to US schools is not an appropriate comparison. Many undergraduate students get admitted to highly ranked, prestigious Ivy League undergraduate universities ( Penn & Princeton, for example) with the assistance of connected and knowledgeable educational consultants. The situation at the University of Pennsylvania--the largest of the 8 Ivy League undergraduate schools--was well publicized a few years ago when it was revealed that then-current Penn/Wharton MBA admissions officers also ran an educational consulting side-business & recruited clients from Penn's summer program for high school juniors. Those who paid the $10,000 & applied binding "early decision" had an amazing success rate. The other "P" Ivy operates in a much more subtle fashion & requires connections. A former admissions officer from Dartmouth often makes more than $1 million a year specializing in Ivy League undergraduate admissions, as well as to other elite colleges & universities. I know of many others utilizing consultants with inside knowledge, extensive experience & connections for elite college & university undergraduate admissions in the US.

Law school admissions, to my knowledge, is different in the US & based largely on applicants' LSAT score & GPA. There are fewer law schools--200--than universities & colleges--almost 3,000--in the US, far fewer law school applicants & rigorous oversight by the ABA &, to a certain extent, state bar associations that make under-the-table admissions less likely & far less common--but they do occur sometimes with respect to those politically connected with that state's law school. Whether or not use of a law school admissions consultant is worthwhile depends upon one's own situation.
Last edited by CanadianWolf on Mon Jun 13, 2011 10:53 am, edited 2 times in total.

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bjsesq
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Re: Are admission consultants worth the money?

Postby bjsesq » Mon Jun 13, 2011 10:48 am

jdMission wrote:No one can deny that your LSAT score and undergraduate GPA (and graduate GPA, as the case may be) are two of the most important factors with regard to which law schools may grant you admittance, but they are not the only ones that matter. You need to spend a good deal of time on your complete application, including your resume, your essays and your letters of recommendation. Why? Because these additional elements of the application provide a more complete picture of you as an applicant—and can truly make the difference between being accepted and being rejected. This is where an admissions consultant can really help.

Your essay may demonstrate your strong writing abilities, even if your GPA is not as strong as you would like it to be. A detailed resume can demonstrate to the admissions committee that you would add diversity to an entering class that would not be the same without someone like you. Letters of recommendations can demonstrate your strong capacity to succeed in law school, even if your LSAT scores may not be stellar.

Don’t discount any element of the application process. Law schools continue to ask for a variety of elements for a reason—to get a complete sense of you as a candidate. Be your best advocate.



You're afraid; I understand that. And because I know you are afraid, I will be here to prey on your fears. Eventually, those fears will likely overcome your common sense. When that happens, please do not hesitate to contact me.

Sunitha Ramaiah
Co-Founder and Consultant jdMission

scammedhard
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Re: Are admission consultants worth the money?

Postby scammedhard » Mon Jun 13, 2011 10:59 am

CanadianWolf wrote:Law school admissions, to my knowledge, is different in the US & based largely on applicants' LSAT score & GPA. There are fewer law schools--200--than universities & colleges--almost 3,000--in the US, far fewer law school applicants & rigorous oversight by the ABA &, to a certain extent, state bar associations that make under-the-table admissions less likely & far less common--but they do occur sometimes with respect to those politically connected with that state's law school. Whether or not use of a law school admissions consultant is worthwhile depends upon one's own situation.

Rigorous oversight by the ABA? In our universe?

CanadianWolf
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Re: Are admission consultants worth the money?

Postby CanadianWolf » Mon Jun 13, 2011 11:02 am

It was even more substantial until the lawsuit by "for profit" law schools a few years ago. And yes, compared to undergraduate schools, the ABA requirements & oversight are significant.

P.S. Your universe is very young & inexperienced.

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Flips88
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Re: Are admission consultants worth the money?

Postby Flips88 » Mon Jun 13, 2011 11:07 am

CanadianWolf wrote:It was even more substantial until the lawsuit by "for profit" law schools a few years ago. And yes, compared to undergraduate schools, the ABA requirements & oversight are substantial.

P.S. Your universe is very young & inexperienced.

Compared to med schools, they are a huge joke

Oh and re: OP

--ImageRemoved--

CanadianWolf
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Re: Are admission consultants worth the money?

Postby CanadianWolf » Mon Jun 13, 2011 11:09 am

But OP is not comparing anything other than law school admission with elite undergraduate admission. Med schools get to deal in areas that are already heavily regulated (drugs & corpses, for example).

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Yeags
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Re: Are admission consultants worth the money?

Postby Yeags » Mon Jun 13, 2011 11:17 am

CanadianWolf wrote:OP: Try asking: "For those who have used an admissions consultant for law school admissions, what was your experience ?"


Comparing law school admissions to elite undergraduate admissions to US schools is not an appropriate comparison. Many undergraduate students get admitted to highly ranked, prestigious Ivy League undergraduate universities ( Penn & Princeton, for example) with the assistance of connected and knowledgeable educational consultants. The situation at the University of Pennsylvania--the largest of the 8 Ivy League undergraduate schools--was well publicized a few years ago when it was revealed that then-current Penn/Wharton MBA admissions officers also ran an educational consulting side-business & recruited clients from Penn's summer program for high school juniors. Those who paid the $10,000 & applied binding "early decision" had an amazing success rate. The other "P" Ivy operates in a much more subtle fashion & requires connections. A former admissions officer from Dartmouth often makes more than $1 million a year specializing in Ivy League undergraduate admissions, as well as to other elite colleges & universities. I know of many others utilizing consultants with inside knowledge, extensive experience & connections for elite college & university undergraduate admissions in the US.

Law school admissions, to my knowledge, is different in the US & based largely on applicants' LSAT score & GPA. There are fewer law schools--200--than universities & colleges--almost 3,000--in the US, far fewer law school applicants & rigorous oversight by the ABA &, to a certain extent, state bar associations that make under-the-table admissions less likely & far less common--but they do occur sometimes with respect to those politically connected with that state's law school. Whether or not use of a law school admissions consultant is worthwhile depends upon one's own situation.


That question does sound better. I had a feeling there was something going on with the undergrad admissions. Thank you for clarifying.

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Wade LeBosh
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Re: Are admission consultants worth the money?

Postby Wade LeBosh » Mon Jun 13, 2011 1:09 pm

Law school consultants are a joke. If they know so much about law school admissions why don't they go to YLS? Surely a YLS graduate has more interesting work and better pay than an admissions consultant. It's a sham of an industry that preys on the insecurities and ignorance of 0Ls.

paulinaporizkova
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Re: Are admission consultants worth the money?

Postby paulinaporizkova » Mon Jun 13, 2011 1:14 pm

Kilpatrick wrote:
jdMission wrote:No one can deny that your LSAT score and undergraduate GPA (and graduate GPA, as the case may be) are two of the most important factors with regard to which law schools may grant you admittance



as we all know, your graduate GPA is really what makes or breaks you in this game

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db616
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Re: Are admission consultants worth the money?

Postby db616 » Mon Jun 13, 2011 1:14 pm

delusional wrote:Seems like a good place to paraphrase what I read in a law school admissions book today, quoted from an admissions counselor. "Anyone who would apply to both NYU and Cornell is totally insane".


Huh?

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NYC Law
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Re: Are admission consultants worth the money?

Postby NYC Law » Mon Jun 13, 2011 1:16 pm

TBF, I would pay good money to have neonx as my admissions consultant.




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