So you've decided to take a year off to teach overseas...

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hous
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So you've decided to take a year off to teach overseas...

Postby hous » Tue Apr 26, 2011 10:32 pm

...and you have no clue where to begin the transition?

Well, I was in your shoes 2 years ago and am here to guide you on the dos and don'ts of teaching overseas, predominately in Asia.
Like many of you, I chose to take a year off to teach English in China. I chose to teach overseas because I wasn't prepared for Law School, not because I was trying to give my application a "boost." I chose China for many reasons; I wanted to learn Mandarin, living in a country that has very little Western influence was fascinating, and the opportunity to travel the many ancient cities of China motivated me. I spent a year in China where I taught in a private university and a month in Seoul, South Korea where I taught in a private summer English Camp.

Should I teach in China or Korea?
China and Korea are very different. I loved both countries and can't wait to visit both again, hopefully soon. I will be honest though, working in China isn’t for everyone. China recently overcame Japan for the title of the second largest global economy, however it’s still pretty poor. You won’t have all of the western commodities like deodorant (forget about it), shaving cream (I found conditioner worked like a charm), and air conditioner (did I mention there's no deodorant)? You will experience a very different culture in China however, people will stare at you, strangers will ask you go eat dinner with them even though they don't know a word of English (not recommended btw) and you will see markets unlike anything in Korea. China is very dirty. Its commonplace to see children and the elderly urinate in the middle of the street, to come to their defense it’s very difficult to find a public bathroom. Korea is the opposite, it’s very clean in Seoul, though I heard outside of the capital is another story. Seoul is similar to large cities in the USA, except cleaner. There are western restaurants, supermarkets, commodities, and hangouts. It’s not easy getting homesick in Seoul.

Another difference is the salary. First the similarities. Both China and Korea usually pay for your apartment and airfare for year long contracts. The biggest difference is the salary. As you would expect you will make significantly more money in South Korea than you will make in China, however it’s also much easier to spend it… Everything is an adventure in China, and there will always be a native Chinese person begging to help you with everything. Very helpful culture.
There are like 2 brackets of pay in China, the first being the University teacher which usually makes around 5,000rmb ($766) a month. The pay sucks to Western standards but you won’t pay for your apartment, electricity (usually) or water (usually). You’ll also only work 18 teaching hours with no required office hours. You teach you go home, very easy. The other job is the elementary-middle-high school teacher, which will pay around 8,000rmb ($1,149) a month. This job is more much demanding, but nothing unreasonable. You will work 40 hours a week and be exhausted by the time you get home. With both jobs in China you will be paraded around as the schools pride and joy, other schools will visit and be in aww of your westerness. Korea will normally pay you around 2,000,000 Won (+or-$1800)a month and again you won’t pay for your apartment unless you work for a hagwon, (private language school) but from what I hear avoid hagwons at all cost. Koreans will work you, you’re not just a pretty foreigner to show off to parents, you are expected to work HARD.

I found the best way to get jobs was to post my resume on http://www.eslteachersboard.com and http://www.eslcafe.com. Both have a China and Korea subforum. I usually just posted my resume and waited for schools to contact me, rather than search for them. A good forum to visit to ask questions on living and working in China is http://www.raulschinasaloon.com. I’m not a supporter of using recruiters because they are notorious for deceiving unsuspecting foreigners. It’s best to work for a government run school in China because they won’t normally rip you off because they are licensed to hire foreigners. It’s not easy for a school to become licensed, and you don’t have any legal right to unpaid wages if you work for a unlicensed school. In fact they can even pay off the local police and have you deported. THE BEST WAY TO TELL IF A CHINESE SCHOOL HAS A LICENSE TO HIRE FOREIGNERS IS TO ASK IF THEY WILL PROVIDE YOU WITH A Z VISA (WORK VISA) BEFORE YOU LEAVE YOUR COUNTRY. The oldest trick in the book is to tell you they will give you a Z visa in China, however it’s impossible and they know you won’t leave once you get there.

Getting a work visa is like $150 for Americans and $30 for everyone else… It’s not difficult, you just mail in your passport, copy of 4-year degree, medical exam papers, and payment to the Chinese Consulate in your home country and they mail you your Passport with the visa. Korea is a little more confusing. You have to send the Korean Embassy an appostille (super notary) of your degree, passport, medical exam papers, payment, and college transcripts. You are required to go to a Korean Consulate IN YOUR COUNTRY OF CITIZENSHIP in person. If you are in another country, you must go back to your country just to do the interview that takes 2 minutes (Guam counts). The employer must send an invitation letter including their license to employ you. If you just want a temporary work visa (good for 3 months) you have to do everything else, but you don’t have to go your country of citizenship. These things take time, if a school tells you to hurry and come on a tourist visa, reject the offer immediately and cut contact with them, it’s a scam.

If you decide to give it a shot here’s a list of items I would advise on stocking up on:

1. Undershirts
2. Deodorant (year supply, you can buy this in Korea, but the quality is awful and the pricetag frightening!)
3. Shaving cream
4. If you’re a girl, tampons (china only)
5. If you have large feet, bring a couple pairs of shoes (china only, Koreans tend to be bigger people).
6. English to Chinese/Korean translation book

Other general comments: Chinese people aren’t yelling at you, they are just loud. They aren’t trying to spook you, they are just staring at you because they are interested in you. My average meal in China was less than a dollar for good quality food. I received the best and most professional haircuts in China for .80 cents (crazy). Koreans may expect you to pay for everyone’s drink, but they will get you back next time. Don’t point out the similarities between the Korean and Japanese spoken language, actually don’t mention Japan over there…

My advice: Go and enjoy yourself. Travel Asia and come back with great stories. Just don’t get burned by an unlicensed school.

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Knock
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Re: So you've decided to take a year off to teach overseas...

Postby Knock » Tue Apr 26, 2011 10:34 pm

Fixed the formatting so I can read it. Really interesting and informative post, thanks a lot!

hous wrote:...and you have no clue where to begin the transition?

Well, I was in your shoes 2 years ago and am here to guide you on the dos and don'ts of teaching overseas, predominately in Asia.

Like many of you, I chose to take a year off to teach English in China. I chose to teach overseas because I wasn't prepared for Law School, not because I was trying to give my application a "boost." I chose China for many reasons; I wanted to learn Mandarin, living in a country that has very little Western influence was fascinating, and the opportunity to travel the many ancient cities of China motivated me. I spent a year in China where I taught in a private university and a month in Seoul, South Korea where I taught in a private summer English Camp.

Should I teach in China or Korea?
China and Korea are very different. I loved both countries and can't wait to visit both again, hopefully soon. I will be honest though, working in China isn’t for everyone. China recently overcame Japan for the title of the second largest global economy, however it’s still pretty poor. You won’t have all of the western commodities like deodorant (forget about it), shaving cream (I found conditioner worked like a charm), and air conditioner (did I mention there's no deodorant)? You will experience a very different culture in China however, people will stare at you, strangers will ask you go eat dinner with them even though they don't know a word of English (not recommended btw) and you will see markets unlike anything in Korea. China is very dirty. Its commonplace to see children and the elderly urinate in the middle of the street, to come to their defense it’s very difficult to find a public bathroom. Korea is the opposite, it’s very clean in Seoul, though I heard outside of the capital is another story. Seoul is similar to large cities in the USA, except cleaner. There are western restaurants, supermarkets, commodities, and hangouts. It’s not easy getting homesick in Seoul.

Another difference is the salary. First the similarities. Both China and Korea usually pay for your apartment and airfare for year long contracts. The biggest difference is the salary. As you would expect you will make significantly more money in South Korea than you will make in China, however it’s also much easier to spend it… Everything is an adventure in China, and there will always be a native Chinese person begging to help you with everything. Very helpful culture.
There are like 2 brackets of pay in China, the first being the University teacher which usually makes around 5,000rmb ($766) a month. The pay sucks to Western standards but you won’t pay for your apartment, electricity (usually) or water (usually). You’ll also only work 18 teaching hours with no required office hours. You teach you go home, very easy. The other job is the elementary-middle-high school teacher, which will pay around 8,000rmb ($1,149) a month. This job is more much demanding, but nothing unreasonable. You will work 40 hours a week and be exhausted by the time you get home. With both jobs in China you will be paraded around as the schools pride and joy, other schools will visit and be in aww of your westerness. Korea will normally pay you around 2,000,000 Won (+or-$1800)a month and again you won’t pay for your apartment unless you work for a hagwon, (private language school) but from what I hear avoid hagwons at all cost. Koreans will work you, you’re not just a pretty foreigner to show off to parents, you are expected to work HARD.

I found the best way to get jobs was to post my resume on http://www.eslteachersboard.com and http://www.eslcafe.com. Both have a China and Korea subforum. I usually just posted my resume and waited for schools to contact me, rather than search for them. A good forum to visit to ask questions on living and working in China is http://www.raulschinasaloon.com. I’m not a supporter of using recruiters because they are notorious for deceiving unsuspecting foreigners. It’s best to work for a government run school in China because they won’t normally rip you off because they are licensed to hire foreigners. It’s not easy for a school to become licensed, and you don’t have any legal right to unpaid wages if you work for a unlicensed school. In fact they can even pay off the local police and have you deported. THE BEST WAY TO TELL IF A CHINESE SCHOOL HAS A LICENSE TO HIRE FOREIGNERS IS TO ASK IF THEY WILL PROVIDE YOU WITH A Z VISA (WORK VISA) BEFORE YOU LEAVE YOUR COUNTRY. The oldest trick in the book is to tell you they will give you a Z visa in China, however it’s impossible and they know you won’t leave once you get there.

Getting a work visa is like $150 for Americans and $30 for everyone else… It’s not difficult, you just mail in your passport, copy of 4-year degree, medical exam papers, and payment to the Chinese Consulate in your home country and they mail you your Passport with the visa. Korea is a little more confusing. You have to send the Korean Embassy an appostille (super notary) of your degree, passport, medical exam papers, payment, and college transcripts. You are required to go to a Korean Consulate IN YOUR COUNTRY OF CITIZENSHIP in person. If you are in another country, you must go back to your country just to do the interview that takes 2 minutes (Guam counts). The employer must send an invitation letter including their license to employ you. If you just want a temporary work visa (good for 3 months) you have to do everything else, but you don’t have to go your country of citizenship. These things take time, if a school tells you to hurry and come on a tourist visa, reject the offer immediately and cut contact with them, it’s a scam.

If you decide to give it a shot here’s a list of items I would advise on stocking up on:

1. Undershirts
2. Deodorant (year supply, you can buy this in Korea, but the quality is awful and the pricetag frightening!)
3. Shaving cream
4. If you’re a girl, tampons (china only)
5. If you have large feet, bring a couple pairs of shoes (china only, Koreans tend to be bigger people).
6. English to Chinese/Korean translation book

Other general comments: Chinese people aren’t yelling at you, they are just loud. They aren’t trying to spook you, they are just staring at you because they are interested in you. My average meal in China was less than a dollar for good quality food. I received the best and most professional haircuts in China for .80 cents (crazy). Koreans may expect you to pay for everyone’s drink, but they will get you back next time. Don’t point out the similarities between the Korean and Japanese spoken language, actually don’t mention Japan over there…

My advice: Go and enjoy yourself. Travel Asia and come back with great stories. Just don’t get burned by an unlicensed school.
Last edited by Knock on Tue Apr 26, 2011 10:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.

bhan87
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Re: So you've decided to take a year off to teach overseas...

Postby bhan87 » Tue Apr 26, 2011 10:38 pm

Only China and Korea? No Japan love?

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hous
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Re: So you've decided to take a year off to teach overseas...

Postby hous » Tue Apr 26, 2011 10:55 pm

bhan87 wrote:Only China and Korea? No Japan love?


Are you interested in teaching in Japan right now? From what I hear, Japan is cool pays well too but you can't save anything because everything is super expensive and you have to pay rent. Its also very selective.

whymeohgodno
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Re: So you've decided to take a year off to teach overseas...

Postby whymeohgodno » Tue Apr 26, 2011 10:57 pm

I'm lolol and I agree with most of what you said about Korea. I'm surprised you found Korean (Seoul parts) not expensive though. From when I visited the COL gets pretty high there -- probably on par with Japan?

Also never mention Japan to Koreans. Unless you are mentioning them to say something bad.
Last edited by whymeohgodno on Fri May 06, 2011 9:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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hous
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Re: So you've decided to take a year off to teach overseas...

Postby hous » Tue Apr 26, 2011 11:05 pm

whymeohgodno wrote:I'm Korean and I agree with most of what you said about Korea. I'm surprised you found Korean (Seoul parts) not expensive though. From when I visited the COL gets pretty high there -- probably on par with Japan?

Also never mention Japan to Koreans. Unless you are mentioning them to say something bad.


I didnt think Korea was cheap, but compared with the money they pay, you can save a pretty penny and live well off at the same time. food is definately more expensive than in China, but you can still eat well for about $10 a day and thats your only real expense. Korean food is delicious too, I miss those Kimbap things. Family mart sold those bad boys and they got me looking forward to waking up in the mornings. Very impressive for convienent store food.

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dr123
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Re: So you've decided to take a year off to teach overseas...

Postby dr123 » Tue Apr 26, 2011 11:08 pm

are there teaching programs in Taipei?

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hous
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Re: So you've decided to take a year off to teach overseas...

Postby hous » Tue Apr 26, 2011 11:11 pm

dr123 wrote:are there teaching programs in Taipei?


Most likely, I don't have first hand experience with this though. I know Hong Kong has a very selective market for English teachers.

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Ikki
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Re: So you've decided to take a year off to teach overseas...

Postby Ikki » Tue Apr 26, 2011 11:51 pm

hous wrote:My average meal in China was less than a dollar for good quality food. I received the best and most professional haircuts in China for .80 cents (crazy).


:shock: Holy fuck, that cheap?

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niederbomb
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Re: So you've decided to take a year off to teach overseas...

Postby niederbomb » Wed Apr 27, 2011 6:38 am

Ikki wrote:
hous wrote:My average meal in China was less than a dollar for good quality food. I received the best and most professional haircuts in China for .80 cents (crazy).


:shock: Holy fuck, that cheap?


Where in China did you live?

Seriously, that ain't happening these days in the bigger cities, especially not for clean food. Typical is about 15-30 RMB ($2-5).


I chose to teach overseas because I wasn't prepared for Law School, not because I was trying to give my application a "boost." I chose China for many reason


If you saw many of the folks who teach English in China, you'd scratch your head if any top tier law school wouldn't consider it a negative on your application, similar to working at McDonalds for a whole year. Impressing the adcomms is definitely NOT a reason to work in China.

Also, as OP said, public schools in China are a much better deal; avoid the so-called "language mills" like Sunbo and English First at all costs. However, my personal experience has been that the best jobs are actually working as the "staff teacher" for a private corporation that isn't actually a school. Doing this can quite easily lead to other, more interesting jobs. Also, some so-called "education consulting" companies pay quite well, like up to $3,000 per month. I'd look at all the websites, including ones like AbroadChina.org and keep your mind open. Government schools are a good option, language mills are a terrible option, but these aren't the only two choices available.

Overall, China is not a bad place at all if you want to have an adventure and learn to appreciate America more. Americans have a lot of stereotypes (negative and positive) about China and Chinese people, and interestingly, nearly all of them are wrong.

(Posted from somewhere in Manchuria)

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ResolutePear
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Re: So you've decided to take a year off to teach overseas...

Postby ResolutePear » Wed Apr 27, 2011 6:51 am

niederbomb wrote:Americans have a lot of stereotypes (negative and positive) about China and Chinese people, and interestingly, nearly all of them are wrong.

(Posted from somewhere in Manchuria)


Wait.. so if I go there.. I *WONT* have an assload(..giggity) of women trying to sleep with me? What a rip.

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niederbomb
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Re: So you've decided to take a year off to teach overseas...

Postby niederbomb » Wed Apr 27, 2011 6:56 am

ResolutePear wrote:
niederbomb wrote:Americans have a lot of stereotypes (negative and positive) about China and Chinese people, and interestingly, nearly all of them are wrong.

(Posted from somewhere in Manchuria)


Wait.. so if I go there.. I *WONT* have an assload(..giggity) of women trying to sleep with me? What a rip.


Nah, that one's correct, though I didn't know it was a widely-held stereotype.

I'd advise learning some Chinese, though. The expat-friendly girls who speak English are all pretty old and ugly, and your options in both quality and quantity will increase exponentially if you learn the language.

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hous
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Re: So you've decided to take a year off to teach overseas...

Postby hous » Wed Apr 27, 2011 6:58 am

I was there just 6 months ago in a large city (nothing like Beijing or Shanghai, just a very large Chinese city).

In the wealthy cities like Beijing you cant eat for less than 4 dollars, but everywhere else its practically free. I purposely sought a job in one of these cities as it was something that interested me.

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ResolutePear
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Re: So you've decided to take a year off to teach overseas...

Postby ResolutePear » Wed Apr 27, 2011 6:59 am

niederbomb wrote:
ResolutePear wrote:
niederbomb wrote:Americans have a lot of stereotypes (negative and positive) about China and Chinese people, and interestingly, nearly all of them are wrong.

(Posted from somewhere in Manchuria)


Wait.. so if I go there.. I *WONT* have an assload(..giggity) of women trying to sleep with me? What a rip.


Nah, that one's correct, though I didn't know it was a widely-held stereotype.

I'd advise learning some Chinese, though. The expat-friendly girls who speak English are all pretty old and ugly, and your options in both quality and quantity will increase exponentially if you learn the language.


You sir, are a gentleman and a scholar.

phannahan44
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Re: So you've decided to take a year off to teach overseas...

Postby phannahan44 » Wed Apr 27, 2011 11:54 am

hous wrote:I was there just 6 months ago in a large city (nothing like Beijing or Shanghai, just a very large Chinese city).

In the wealthy cities like Beijing you cant eat for less than 4 dollars, but everywhere else its practically free. I purposely sought a job in one of these cities as it was something that interested me.


Great post in general, man. I just got back from 2 years teaching English and studying Mandarin in Hangzhou, China, and loved it -- best experience of my life. I, too, went just to learn and live in another country, I definitely wouldn't recommend doing something like it merely for an "app boost," I would recommend it for anyone that's open-minded, adventurous, and legitimately passionate about travel and other cultures.

Overall, it was indeed a life-changing experience and I think it helped me get ready for law school and kind of put things in perspective. If anyone is interested please PM me I like to talk about my experiences in China and am more than happy to help guide folks in the right direction if they're seriously considering doing something similar.

Cheers.

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Cupcakes
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Re: So you've decided to take a year off to teach overseas...

Postby Cupcakes » Wed Apr 27, 2011 12:12 pm

This all sounds very interesting! What qualifications do you need to do this? Anything other than a 4-yr degree?

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pjo
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Re: So you've decided to take a year off to teach overseas...

Postby pjo » Wed Apr 27, 2011 1:41 pm

phannahan44 wrote:
hous wrote:I was there just 6 months ago in a large city (nothing like Beijing or Shanghai, just a very large Chinese city).

In the wealthy cities like Beijing you cant eat for less than 4 dollars, but everywhere else its practically free. I purposely sought a job in one of these cities as it was something that interested me.


Great post in general, man. I just got back from 2 years teaching English and studying Mandarin in Hangzhou, China, and loved it -- best experience of my life. I, too, went just to learn and live in another country, I definitely wouldn't recommend doing something like it merely for an "app boost," I would recommend it for anyone that's open-minded, adventurous, and legitimately passionate about travel and other cultures.

Overall, it was indeed a life-changing experience and I think it helped me get ready for law school and kind of put things in perspective. If anyone is interested please PM me I like to talk about my experiences in China and am more than happy to help guide folks in the right direction if they're seriously considering doing something similar.

Cheers.



phannahan44, I tried to PM you but it says you disabled your PM function. If you're still willing to talk send me a PM.

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hous
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Re: So you've decided to take a year off to teach overseas...

Postby hous » Wed Apr 27, 2011 7:15 pm

Cupcakes wrote:This all sounds very interesting! What qualifications do you need to do this? Anything other than a 4-yr degree?


They prefer you to be a native born person in a English speaking country. Unfortunately they also prefer "white faces." My girlfriend is an Asian American and we had a hell of a time getting a job in China because the said "She has a Chinese Face." We heard this too too many times. Some schools even said they would hire me and my GF could work in private schools nearby, yeah right. In China they would literally hire a Russian who has a thick accent and knows English as a second language than an Asian American.

You have to pass a medical check, in China they will generally make you do this twice. Once in your country before you get the visa, and another time in China. I dont understand the logic but apparently they feel their test are more reliable...

Korea wants you to have your degree appostilled.

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hous
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Re: So you've decided to take a year off to teach overseas...

Postby hous » Wed Apr 27, 2011 7:17 pm

This is a pm I thought had good questions. I will share it here.

anonymous wrote:hous,

Thanks for the link - it was very informative. I have two quick questions though:

1) What is your opinion regarding posing your resume online and privacy concerns ( identity theft, etc.). Are you able to just put "B.A. 4 year college degree" (to add some privacy) or must you be more specific? Have you experienced any problems as a result of posting your resume? Any other suggestions?

2) I was hoping to develop some Mandarin skills during my time there. I will likely preempt my language studying before actually arriving, but I was wondering how realistic you consider this to be. Did you find that you came out of the experience knowing Mandarin fluently? I plan on hopefully being there for 2 months, so obviously my experience/expectations are different. But overall, what do you think I might be able to accomplish in this timeframe (I tend to be a pretty fast learner).

3) Do you think I will receive any responses in time for summer employment? How long does it typically take to hear something?

Thanks for all of your help. I have been looking into this for a while, but the process is pretty complicated and I have had some concerns regarding privacy/scams on some of the websites, so your input is/would be greatly appreciated.

Best,
Law

1 you can post your resume online, but I dont recommend giving your degree, passport and medical check to just anyone. Though I did give out my passport probably too freely...

2. Mandarin is very difficuly because its so different and from Germanic languages. You wont learn Mandarin fluently in 2 months, I suppose its possible in a yeat but 2 or 3 is more realistic. I studied not so much and just used Rosetta Stone, Im by no means fluent but I can catch the gist of what whats being discussed.

3. Korean Summer camps will hire all the up to a week before classes start, but it takes time to get the visa and airplane tickets are much higher the closer you get to your departure date. I would remmend posting something breif, with a picture, and state "I have my passport, medical check, degree and transcripts in hand and am ready to take them to get a ______ visa. If you are really desperate and dont mind telling a white lie, you can go ahead and say you already bought your ticket to the country and are just waiting on a licensed school to provide you with a visa.

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tdicks
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Re: So you've decided to take a year off to teach overseas...

Postby tdicks » Fri Apr 29, 2011 12:26 am

i've been living in china for a few years now and would add that the best jobs are normally with international/bilingual kindergartens. kids are cute and they pay wayyy more. double to triple most other teaching jobs. private tutoring is also an option once you get here. depending on the city, you can typically get about 200 rmb (30 bucks) an hour (that's in big cities like beijing/shanghai/guangzhou/shenzhen) which adds up fast. living in shenzhen working at a kindergarten i was able to save around 10,000 usd and thats with spending a ridiculous amount of money on things like nights at the peninsula in hong kong, a burberry coat, and a week at a 5 star villa in thailand.

i would also reiterate that china is NOT for everyone. i love living here and will be sad to leave, but some people are just not cut out for life in china. for one, you need to be extremely adaptable. more importantly, i think, is you need to be culturally aware. some things that happen here just do not make sense by american standards and will really piss you off. if you can't let those things go, you won't make it. mandarin is also a bitch. it starts out easy, but it's going to take a while to get to any sort of actual conversational level. english is pretty common though, so if you aren't interested in learning it, you certainly don't have to. i have one friend who came here and studied like a beast for a year and could watch TV shows and pretty much understand what was going on. i have another friend who has been here for two years and can say things like "turn left", "i want this", "she is my friend", etc.

all that being said, i doubt i'll ever have as much fun as i've had in shanghai.

CMDantes
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Re: So you've decided to take a year off to teach overseas...

Postby CMDantes » Fri Apr 29, 2011 3:11 am

tdicks wrote:
some things that happen here just do not make sense by american standards and will really piss you off. if you can't let those things go, you won't make it.



Care to elaborate?

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tdicks
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Re: So you've decided to take a year off to teach overseas...

Postby tdicks » Fri Apr 29, 2011 3:29 am

CMDantes wrote:
tdicks wrote:
some things that happen here just do not make sense by american standards and will really piss you off. if you can't let those things go, you won't make it.



Care to elaborate?


i mean, all kinds of things. i'll give two examples that i can think of right off the top of my head, one on each end of the spectrum (minor to major).

minor: the country is broken into north and south by a river. if you live south of the river, "it doesn't get cold" so most buildings don't have heating/decent insulation. this includes shanghai, where it snowed multiple times this year. additionally, (in general) chinese people think "stale air" makes you sick, so they frequently open windows and/or doors to allow fresh air in, even in the winter.

major: a couple years ago in shenzhen the education bureau (i was working for a public school at the time) told us that we would have a week off in may. people immediately started planning, and in some cases booking, trips. a few days later, it was decided that we only got one day off. (this was in april)

for me it's never been anything too serious, but (depending on the city/how westernized your work place is/your specific boss/etc.) things like this happen pretty frequently. add it on to culture shock/homesickness/not having a good support circle/whatever, it can be too much for a lot of people.

bayarea
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Re: So you've decided to take a year off to teach overseas...

Postby bayarea » Wed May 04, 2011 2:51 pm

Can anyone point me in the direction of good reputable organizations to go with?




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