In-State an advantage or disadvantage?

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fragged
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In-State an advantage or disadvantage?

Postby fragged » Mon Feb 28, 2011 6:11 pm

I'm sure there is a list of reasons schools have been raising tuition significantly, but I am wondering how in-state vs. out-of-state tuition factors in, considering the current state of the economy. If there is one thing I've learned, it's that everything is about money. Everything. Yes, everything.

Take your average state school for example. After all the in-state quotas are filled, why would a school not look to out-of-state students who simply have to pay more to attend? It seems like a pretty easy way to quickly increase revenue.

Other than mandates by the state, board of regents, etc, what other reasons would a school have to give preference to an in-state candidate, especially when they can collect an additional 30%-50% (or more) from an out-of-state candidate?

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minnbills
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Re: In-State an advantage or disadvantage?

Postby minnbills » Mon Feb 28, 2011 6:21 pm

Well, in state students are more likely to stay in the area, and therefore more likely to contribute down the road. It also helps with the long-term alumni network.

CanadianWolf
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Re: In-State an advantage or disadvantage?

Postby CanadianWolf » Mon Feb 28, 2011 6:27 pm

Often the excess tuition paid by non-residents is only paid until residency status is obtained. Beyond state mandates & liklihood of residents remaining in state, law schools need to attract employers and that is done by producing a strong product, therefore, law schools are looking for the best qualified students before temporary out-of-state tuition revenues, in my opinion.

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fragged
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Re: In-State an advantage or disadvantage?

Postby fragged » Mon Feb 28, 2011 6:34 pm

CanadianWolf wrote:Often the excess tuition paid by non-residents is only paid until residency status is obtained. Beyond state mandates & liklihood of residents remaining in state, law schools need to attract employers and that is done by producing a strong product, therefore, law schools are looking for the best qualified students before temporary out-of-state tuition revenues, in my opinion.


I guess I'm asking if all things are equal between 2 candidates, would their in-state status be more or less attractive than an extra $15k in revenue? Also, several states make it difficult to obtain residency after only one year.

renwei0905
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Re: In-State an advantage or disadvantage?

Postby renwei0905 » Wed Mar 02, 2011 10:15 am


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T6Hopeful
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Re: In-State an advantage or disadvantage?

Postby T6Hopeful » Wed Mar 02, 2011 7:39 pm

I don't know if it's the same for law school, but my state school undergrad explains the difference between in-state and out-of-state tuition as a sort of "penalty" they have to pay the State's Department of Ed for every out-of-state student they take. I didn't think this made any sense because the school wouldn't be any worse off for taking out-of-state students, but after taking a basic/intermediate economics class, I'm realizing it's the substitution effect at work...

So to make this relevant to law schools, it depends on the state no matter what. But if the state school(s) you're talking about are like mine, it seems the school (or at least the undergrad) gets an implicit no-no when taking too many out-of-state students.

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aspire2more
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Re: In-State an advantage or disadvantage?

Postby aspire2more » Wed Mar 02, 2011 8:32 pm

There are 50 states in the United States. Let's say a top-tier public law school gives 100 offers of admission each year (just trying to make this hypo simple). T1 Public reserves 40% of its offers for in-state applicants and leaves 60% for out-of-state applicants. The in-state applicant is competing for one of 40 spots and his/her only competition are other applicants from that state. The out-of-state applicant is competing for one of 60 spots and his competition includes top applicants from 49 states. The quota does great things for in-state applicants, regardless of any other factors that could be taken into consideration.

BeachedBrit
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Re: In-State an advantage or disadvantage?

Postby BeachedBrit » Wed Mar 02, 2011 9:45 pm

In nc the difference between out of state and in state tuition is a payment from the state government using state tax revenue to subsidize the in state students so that at the end of the day the revenue is the same regardless of whether the student is in state or out of state. Source: I am on my undergrads tuition and fees committee.

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minnbills
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Re: In-State an advantage or disadvantage?

Postby minnbills » Wed Mar 02, 2011 10:55 pm

aspire2more wrote:There are 50 states in the United States. Let's say a top-tier public law school gives 100 offers of admission each year (just trying to make this hypo simple). T1 Public reserves 40% of its offers for in-state applicants and leaves 60% for out-of-state applicants. The in-state applicant is competing for one of 40 spots and his/her only competition are other applicants from that state. The out-of-state applicant is competing for one of 60 spots and his competition includes top applicants from 49 states. The quota does great things for in-state applicants, regardless of any other factors that could be taken into consideration.


That's interesting. I would love to see LSN or TLS stats' type data with in-state and out of state applicants seperated.




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