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(Applications Advice, Letters of Recommendation . . . )
btowncane
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Postby btowncane » Fri Jan 14, 2011 12:44 pm

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Last edited by btowncane on Thu Mar 29, 2012 3:32 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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joebloe
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Re: Should I submit an addendum?

Postby joebloe » Fri Jan 14, 2011 1:53 pm

I don't think it would make a huge difference either way, though it depends somewhat on what schools you're applying to. The general idea is that schools care about GPA and LSAT because that's what the rankings take into account.

And before anyone else says it, a retake would be strongly advised given that's a decent GPA. You have almost no chance at any T1 or T2 schools. Even if you're URM, you have almost no chance at T1 and very poor chances at T2. I don't know what went wrong on your LSATs or your SAT, but if you can find the problem and fix it, you can get into a damn good school down the line. Law school will still be there.

michellejs
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Re: Should I submit an addendum?

Postby michellejs » Fri Jan 14, 2011 3:26 pm

I agree that you should definitely look into retaking if possible, and prepare with a really good tutor who can help find your weaknesses and improve upon them. There was a recent New York Times article about how much debt people get in after law school when they can't find jobs, and it is much easier to find a job if you graduate from a top law school. I would say it is certainly worth the investment of studying and paying a tutor to get a better LSAT score and get into a better school.

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TLSanders
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Re: Should I submit an addendum?

Postby TLSanders » Fri Jan 14, 2011 6:54 pm

You are in the rare position of being able to actually demonstrate that standardized test scores are historically not indicative of your true ability--your SAT score was in no way predictive of your grades in college. That makes an addendum worth your while.

However, additional information would be very helpful in better advising you. For example, what schools are you targeting? Which LSAT score came first? What did you do in between them? Why the discrepancy?

The answers to those questions would help determine whether it made sense for you to retake the LSAT. The commonly voiced "nothing to lose" isn't entirely accurate. Right now you have a low score and an abysmal score--if you scored in the 130s again, you would be in a far worse position than you find yourself at this moment.

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Beast15
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Re: Should I submit an addendum?

Postby Beast15 » Fri Jan 14, 2011 7:00 pm

joebloe wrote:I don't think it would make a huge difference either way, though it depends somewhat on what schools you're applying to. The general idea is that schools care about GPA and LSAT because that's what the rankings take into account.

And before anyone else says it, a retake would be strongly advised given that's a decent GPA. You have almost no chance at any T1 or T2 schools. Even if you're URM, you have almost no chance at T1 and very poor chances at T2. I don't know what went wrong on your LSATs or your SAT, but if you can find the problem and fix it, you can get into a damn good school down the line. Law school will still be there.


Sorry about the highjack, but I've always wondered...

why do people pluralize LSAT, MCAT, and the others?

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joebloe
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Re: Should I submit an addendum?

Postby joebloe » Fri Jan 14, 2011 8:59 pm

Beast15 wrote:
joebloe wrote:I don't think it would make a huge difference either way, though it depends somewhat on what schools you're applying to. The general idea is that schools care about GPA and LSAT because that's what the rankings take into account.

And before anyone else says it, a retake would be strongly advised given that's a decent GPA. You have almost no chance at any T1 or T2 schools. Even if you're URM, you have almost no chance at T1 and very poor chances at T2. I don't know what went wrong on your LSATs or your SAT, but if you can find the problem and fix it, you can get into a damn good school down the line. Law school will still be there.


Sorry about the highjack, but I've always wondered...

why do people pluralize LSAT, MCAT, and the others?


In this case, I pluralized because OP indicated that he/she took the LSAT more than once. Note that I did not pluralize SAT as there was no such indication.

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BrownBears09
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Re: Should I submit an addendum?

Postby BrownBears09 » Fri Jan 14, 2011 9:56 pm

btowncane wrote:Hi everyone,

I'm about to submit my law school applications and am wondering if I should attach an addendum explaining my low LSAT scores. I recently graduated from the University of Miami with a 3.77 GPA; however my LSAT scores are 147 and 135. I have heard that it could be beneficial or detrimental to my chances of admission if I submit an addendum explaining my low LSAT scores as a poor predictor of my ability to academically succeed in light of the fact that I have historically done poor on standardized tests (SAT score of 1000).

So my question is, given the above information, should I submit such an addendum with my application? Thank you for your help.


Yes, you should write an addendum, and include a .pdf copy of your old SAT scores if you have it.

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TommyK
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Re: Should I submit an addendum?

Postby TommyK » Fri Jan 14, 2011 10:30 pm

I hate to echo what the average poster will say, but don't bother applying until you get your scores up.

I got a 990 on my SAT, but a 167 on my LSAT (which may not be stellar based on TLS standards, but I'm happy with it). The two are not necessarily correlated and just because you stunk up one - don't let it be an excuse on why you can't rock the next.

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Lawquacious
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Re: Should I submit an addendum?

Postby Lawquacious » Fri Jan 14, 2011 10:37 pm

Retake. You improved a lot since your first official LSAT it looks like, so maybe you can gain some more points? Below 150 is very rought territory IMO, even if you are URM (which I don't know is the case).

Cmart050
Posts: 83
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Re: Should I submit an addendum?

Postby Cmart050 » Fri Jan 14, 2011 11:41 pm

btowncane wrote:Hi everyone,

I'm about to submit my law school applications and am wondering if I should attach an addendum explaining my low LSAT scores. I recently graduated from the University of Miami with a 3.77 GPA; however my LSAT scores are 147 and 135. I have heard that it could be beneficial or detrimental to my chances of admission if I submit an addendum explaining my low LSAT scores as a poor predictor of my ability to academically succeed in light of the fact that I have historically done poor on standardized tests (SAT score of 1000).

So my question is, given the above information, should I submit such an addendum with my application? Thank you for your help.


Ahhhhh I hate doing this, but...

If you have testing problem, which is clearly evident, are you sure law school is for you? 147 and 135 are brutal. You are obviously intelligent, achieving a 3.77 at a respectable institution. But past performance is the greatest indicator of future success. The LSAT is more like a math test than you think, one in which answering new questions becomes automatic with practice because there are only so many ways to ask it. Anyways, best of luck, I hope you can take a class, practice practice practice, score well, apply next cycle, and enjoy the fruits of a great GPA and excellent LSAT score.

If you are hellbent on applying this cycle, yes, an addendum is absolutely necessary. The above posters offer good direction.

btowncane
Posts: 33
Joined: Tue May 27, 2008 12:08 pm

Re: Should I submit an addendum?

Postby btowncane » Sat Jan 15, 2011 10:32 am

TLSanders wrote:However, additional information would be very helpful in better advising you. For example, what schools are you targeting? Which LSAT score came first? What did you do in between them? Why the discrepancy?


I appreciate everyone's advice and will take it into consideration, so thank you for that.

In response to your post, TLSanders, I am currently targeting the University of Miami, Michigan State, Louisiana State, Richmond, Suffolk and Boston College (my reason being the school says explicitly "We may place less consideration on your LSAT score if you have achieved exceptional academic success as an undergraduate despite a history of low standardized test scores.") Another oddity about my situation is that I scored the 147 first and then subsequently dropped down to a 135. One factor contributing to the discrepancy between my scores would be that I became employed full-time while also enrolled full-time in school after the first test which lead to having less time to restudy.

With the above said, do you think I have a decent shot at admittance to the schools I'm targeting? Thanks again.

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TommyK
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Re: Should I submit an addendum?

Postby TommyK » Sat Jan 15, 2011 10:47 am

btowncane wrote:
TLSanders wrote:However, additional information would be very helpful in better advising you. For example, what schools are you targeting? Which LSAT score came first? What did you do in between them? Why the discrepancy?


I appreciate everyone's advice and will take it into consideration, so thank you for that.

In response to your post, TLSanders, I am currently targeting the University of Miami, Michigan State, Louisiana State, Richmond, Suffolk and Boston College (my reason being the school says explicitly "We may place less consideration on your LSAT score if you have achieved exceptional academic success as an undergraduate despite a history of low standardized test scores.") Another oddity about my situation is that I scored the 147 first and then subsequently dropped down to a 135. One factor contributing to the discrepancy between my scores would be that I became employed full-time while also enrolled full-time in school after the first test which lead to having less time to restudy.

With the above said, do you think I have a decent shot at admittance to the schools I'm targeting? Thanks again.


You have somewhere between a 0% and a 0.5% chance at all of them. I've heard of students getting into schools that they're not qualified numerically if they have a fascinating story - e.g., a well-respected physician going to law school, a best-selling author, etc. This kind of outlier is not specifically relegated to Yale, but a lot of schools take these things into consideration. Seriously, you would be wasting your admission fees.

Michigan State is probably the most reasonable (but still totally unreasonable) reach. They've let in a few high-140's over the last couple of years, but they have been almost universally URMs from the data on LSN.

In regards to you working fulltime, I was working fulltime when I studied. It's tough to do, but far from impossible. You just have to make time for it and put some dedication into it.




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