Essay Buzz Words? Compile the Good and the Bad

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things fall apart
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Essay Buzz Words? Compile the Good and the Bad

Postby things fall apart » Mon Oct 25, 2010 6:21 am

Hey guys I am writing a few supplemental and school specific essays. I do strongly believe in certain words, however at times, they do come off as recycled lines and rhetoric that could rival on politicians in tiredness.

Although it is a case-by-case assessment, do you all want to compile words and themes that should be avoided and those that are acceptable?


Good: Using a buzz word and explaining specifically how your work/experience is much like the word (i.e. if writing a DS suggesting how perserverance or dedication is exhibited through you)

Bad: Stating how past success in school will directly beget future success and thats why they should let you in (i.e. history of hard work)

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things fall apart
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Re: Essay Buzz Words? Compile the Good and the Bad

Postby things fall apart » Mon Oct 25, 2010 9:55 am

Hopefully this is the appropriate forum :oops:

Anyway what are the do's and dont's

NonTradHealthLaw
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Re: Essay Buzz Words? Compile the Good and the Bad

Postby NonTradHealthLaw » Mon Oct 25, 2010 10:00 am

The Bad: Unless you can prove you're the only one with that set of circumstances, your situation is likely not unique. IMO it shows a juvenile perspective of the world and/or a limited vocabulary.

u·nique   /yuˈnik/ [yoo-neek]

–adjective
1. existing as the only one or as the sole example; single; solitary in type or characteristics: a unique copy of an ancient manuscript.
2. having no like or equal; unparalleled; incomparable: Bach was unique in his handling of counterpoint.
3. limited in occurrence to a given class, situation, or area: a species unique to Australia.
4. limited to a single outcome or result; without alternative possibilities: Certain types of problems have unique solutions.
5. not typical; unusual: She has a very unique smile.

AP-375
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Re: Essay Buzz Words? Compile the Good and the Bad

Postby AP-375 » Mon Oct 25, 2010 10:13 am

Aren't we all special snowflakes? Isn't everything we do unique?

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things fall apart
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Re: Essay Buzz Words? Compile the Good and the Bad

Postby things fall apart » Mon Oct 25, 2010 10:25 am

NonTradHealthLaw wrote:The Bad: Unless you can prove you're the only one with that set of circumstances, your situation is likely not unique. IMO it shows a juvenile perspective of the world and/or a limited vocabulary.

u·nique   /yuˈnik/ [yoo-neek]

–adjective
1. existing as the only one or as the sole example; single; solitary in type or characteristics: a unique copy of an ancient manuscript.
2. having no like or equal; unparalleled; incomparable: Bach was unique in his handling of counterpoint.
3. limited in occurrence to a given class, situation, or area: a species unique to Australia.
4. limited to a single outcome or result; without alternative possibilities: Certain types of problems have unique solutions.
5. not typical; unusual: She has a very unique smile.



Contrarily could one suggest that their situation is unique to other applicants? Like if I single handedly saved a school in Downtown Detroit I could be reasonably sure I was unique to the applicant pool. Or if I were born in a tiny village in Yemen and I had to raise my siblings while teaching myself computer programming and still made it cum laude through school, that would be unique.

Discuss.

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MarineLaw
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Re: Essay Buzz Words? Compile the Good and the Bad

Postby MarineLaw » Mon Oct 25, 2010 10:32 am

Be passive and give the other variables in your story the measurable influence that they had in real life. If you are too active (I did this, I did that) it lessons your ability to provide insight.

The best essays I have read seem to draw the reader in to assume the identity of the storyteller. The more you purport yourself and give yourself identity equivalent to the rest of the story, the less "luring" you are. Existence without substance. You want the reader to experience the profoundness that has so impacted you. You write it so that maybe, they can get a tiny diluted version of the life experience that has granted you an appropriate level of uniqueness to merit entrance into their school.

I know that's not a single word, but I hate active "I", "me" essays, even though that's what you're writing about

NonTradHealthLaw
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Re: Essay Buzz Words? Compile the Good and the Bad

Postby NonTradHealthLaw » Mon Oct 25, 2010 10:48 am

things fall apart wrote: Contrarily could one suggest that their situation is unique to other applicants? Like if I single handedly saved a school in Downtown Detroit I could be reasonably sure I was unique to the applicant pool. Or if I were born in a tiny village in Yemen and I had to raise my siblings while teaching myself computer programming and still made it cum laude through school, that would be unique.

Discuss.


I think it's just a word that is overused and often inappropriately. Yes, the examples provided are reasonably assumed as unique, but cannot be proven. Too often "unique" is used as a crutch to mean "kinda cool."

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2014
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Re: Essay Buzz Words? Compile the Good and the Bad

Postby 2014 » Mon Oct 25, 2010 11:00 am

things fall apart wrote:Contrarily could one suggest that their situation is unique to other applicants? Like if I single handedly saved a school in Downtown Detroit I could be reasonably sure I was unique to the applicant pool. Or if I were born in a tiny village in Yemen and I had to raise my siblings while teaching myself computer programming and still made it cum laude through school, that would be unique.

Discuss.

One is probably not the only one to have influenced or saved a school, nor are they the only one who had to take on an inordinate amount of responsibility and face adversity while maintaining high academic standards.

When you get down to a web of specific experiences, every one of us is unique. However, the broad themes that one might think make them unique are probably universally more common than anticipated.

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things fall apart
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Re: Essay Buzz Words? Compile the Good and the Bad

Postby things fall apart » Mon Oct 25, 2010 11:18 am

NonTradHealthLaw wrote:
things fall apart wrote: Contrarily could one suggest that their situation is unique to other applicants? Like if I single handedly saved a school in Downtown Detroit I could be reasonably sure I was unique to the applicant pool. Or if I were born in a tiny village in Yemen and I had to raise my siblings while teaching myself computer programming and still made it cum laude through school, that would be unique.

Discuss.


I think it's just a word that is overused and often inappropriately. Yes, the examples provided are reasonably assumed as unique, but cannot be proven. Too often "unique" is used as a crutch to mean "kinda cool."


Fair enough. Although I could banter a bit, I actually was somewhat playing devils advocate as in I do agree that most of the time its not that unique. However if you devalue everyone who wasnt the first black president of America as not unique then where does that leave you? I guess it depends on how you view experiences in relation to others narrowly and broadly.


Anyway, others that are good and bad?

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gdane
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Re: Essay Buzz Words? Compile the Good and the Bad

Postby gdane » Mon Oct 25, 2010 11:29 am

things fall apart wrote:Hey guys I am writing a few supplemental and school specific essays. I do strongly believe in certain words, however at times, they do come off as recycled lines and rhetoric that could rival on politicians in tiredness.

Although it is a case-by-case assessment, do you all want to compile words and themes that should be avoided and those that are acceptable?


Good: Using a buzz word and explaining specifically how your work/experience is much like the word (i.e. if writing a DS suggesting how perserverance or dedication is exhibited through you)

Bad: Stating how past success in school will directly beget future success and thats why they should let you in (i.e. history of hard work)


This is terrible advice. Tying your past experiences/successes to how you would succeed as a law student is a good thing. Schools want you to show them, not just tell them, why you would be successful. Anyone can use "buzz words" (whatever the hell those are) to say "Ill be a hard worker", but that doesnt do anything. Stating "My experiences as assistant manager of XXX company gave me time management skills, mental and physical endurance, etc etc" is much more effective.

I dont know where this "buzz words" idea came from, but its terrible. A well written essay that SHOWS schools that you'd be a good candidate for admission is much better than a paper with a bunch of fancy cool sounding words.

Also, forget about trying to come off as unique as possible. Most people are going to have similar experiences, but dont let that deject you from writing about it. Just because your experience isnt completely "unique" doesnt mean you shouldnt write about it. Play to your strengths. Remember that.

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bk1
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Re: Essay Buzz Words? Compile the Good and the Bad

Postby bk1 » Mon Oct 25, 2010 11:34 am

Dumb thread.

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gdane
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Re: Essay Buzz Words? Compile the Good and the Bad

Postby gdane » Mon Oct 25, 2010 11:35 am

bk1 wrote:Dumb thread.

I agree. Goddamn worst advice Ive ever heard.

Tricks and gimmicks arent going to help you out.

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things fall apart
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Re: Essay Buzz Words? Compile the Good and the Bad

Postby things fall apart » Mon Oct 25, 2010 12:12 pm

gdane5 wrote:
things fall apart wrote:Hey guys I am writing a few supplemental and school specific essays. I do strongly believe in certain words, however at times, they do come off as recycled lines and rhetoric that could rival on politicians in tiredness.

Although it is a case-by-case assessment, do you all want to compile words and themes that should be avoided and those that are acceptable?


Good: Using a buzz word and explaining specifically how your work/experience is much like the word (i.e. if writing a DS suggesting how perserverance or dedication is exhibited through you)

Bad: Stating how past success in school will directly beget future success and thats why they should let you in (i.e. history of hard work)


This is terrible advice. Tying your past experiences/successes to how you would succeed as a law student is a good thing. Schools want you to show them, not just tell them, why you would be successful. Anyone can use "buzz words" (whatever the hell those are) to say "Ill be a hard worker", but that doesnt do anything. Stating "My experiences as assistant manager of XXX company gave me time management skills, mental and physical endurance, etc etc" is much more effective.

I dont know where this "buzz words" idea came from, but its terrible. A well written essay that SHOWS schools that you'd be a good candidate for admission is much better than a paper with a bunch of fancy cool sounding words.

Also, forget about trying to come off as unique as possible. Most people are going to have similar experiences, but dont let that deject you from writing about it. Just because your experience isnt completely "unique" doesnt mean you shouldnt write about it. Play to your strengths. Remember that.


What the hell are you talking about? I never said or even loosely implied that I am seeking words to fool admissions officers(although essentially all of us fool AO into thinking we belong in the LS more than someone else) by using "buzz words". However, "lifetime straight A" and "dedicated student" do engender different connotations by someone on an admission council.

I was simply asking which words to avoid for their counterproductive nature, redundancy, or overuse and which would look bad. Similarly the "good" buzz words or themes would touch on themes that AO have stated they like publically but that may not be well known. And I didnt say a fancy word, in my examples I put a sentence not one didactic word.

I'm not sure what crawled up your ass, got forclosed and commited suicide in the bathtub but theres no need to come in here firing as if youre a guru in the admissions process. SMH.

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Re: Essay Buzz Words? Compile the Good and the Bad

Postby FlightoftheEarls » Mon Oct 25, 2010 1:16 pm

things fall apart wrote:
gdane5 wrote:
things fall apart wrote:Hey guys I am writing a few supplemental and school specific essays. I do strongly believe in certain words, however at times, they do come off as recycled lines and rhetoric that could rival on politicians in tiredness.

Although it is a case-by-case assessment, do you all want to compile words and themes that should be avoided and those that are acceptable?


Good: Using a buzz word and explaining specifically how your work/experience is much like the word (i.e. if writing a DS suggesting how perserverance or dedication is exhibited through you)

Bad: Stating how past success in school will directly beget future success and thats why they should let you in (i.e. history of hard work)


This is terrible advice. Tying your past experiences/successes to how you would succeed as a law student is a good thing. Schools want you to show them, not just tell them, why you would be successful. Anyone can use "buzz words" (whatever the hell those are) to say "Ill be a hard worker", but that doesnt do anything. Stating "My experiences as assistant manager of XXX company gave me time management skills, mental and physical endurance, etc etc" is much more effective.

I dont know where this "buzz words" idea came from, but its terrible. A well written essay that SHOWS schools that you'd be a good candidate for admission is much better than a paper with a bunch of fancy cool sounding words.

Also, forget about trying to come off as unique as possible. Most people are going to have similar experiences, but dont let that deject you from writing about it. Just because your experience isnt completely "unique" doesnt mean you shouldnt write about it. Play to your strengths. Remember that.


What the hell are you talking about? I never said or even loosely implied that I am seeking words to fool admissions officers(although essentially all of us fool AO into thinking we belong in the LS more than someone else) by using "buzz words". However, "lifetime straight A" and "dedicated student" do engender different connotations by someone on an admission council.

I was simply asking which words to avoid for their counterproductive nature, redundancy, or overuse and which would look bad. Similarly the "good" buzz words or themes would touch on themes that AO have stated they like publically but that may not be well known. And I didnt say a fancy word, in my examples I put a sentence not one didactic word.

I'm not sure what crawled up your ass, got forclosed and commited suicide in the bathtub but theres no need to come in here firing as if youre a guru in the admissions process. SMH.

Here's the thing: Your examples of what might be good come across as incredibly trite. An essay that is modeled on the word "Perseverance" and continually relates back to it is going to be incredibly ineffective. You want good advice? Here:

MarineLaw wrote:Be passive and give the other variables in your story the measurable influence that they had in real life. If you are too active (I did this, I did that) it lessons your ability to provide insight.

The best essays I have read seem to draw the reader in to assume the identity of the storyteller. The more you purport yourself and give yourself identity equivalent to the rest of the story, the less "luring" you are. Existence without substance. You want the reader to experience the profoundness that has so impacted you. You write it so that maybe, they can get a tiny diluted version of the life experience that has granted you an appropriate level of uniqueness to merit entrance into their school.

I know that's not a single word, but I hate active "I", "me" essays, even though that's what you're writing about

THIS is good advice. You want to tell a story. You want it to capture the imagination of the admissions officers in two quick pages, leave them wanting to hear more, and do so in a way that reveals who you are without telling them why you are a good candidate. You need to show them who you are as an individual while revealing the qualities they look for in a good candidate, but without ever saying as much.

As an aside, I think using "I" and "me" are okay so long as they relate to an experience that you are in the midst of describing, as opposed to a quality that you possess or an achievement you're listing.

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Pizon
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Re: Essay Buzz Words? Compile the Good and the Bad

Postby Pizon » Mon Oct 25, 2010 8:52 pm

things fall apart wrote:However, "lifetime straight A" and "dedicated student" do engender different connotations by someone on an admission council.


In your wisdom, which is better?




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