Letters of recomendation question?

(Applications Advice, Letters of Recommendation . . . )
deltasigbn
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Letters of recomendation question?

Postby deltasigbn » Wed Aug 04, 2010 2:55 pm

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Last edited by deltasigbn on Wed Aug 31, 2011 2:06 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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bk1
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Re: Letters of recomendation question?

Postby bk1 » Wed Aug 04, 2010 2:57 pm

Your professors should send them, though if they give them to you already sealed then it is fine (because you should be waiving your right to see them).

You can submit paper applications to most schools (visit their websites), but I don't see why you would.

005618502
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Re: Letters of recomendation question?

Postby 005618502 » Wed Aug 04, 2010 2:58 pm

why wouldnt you use LSAC...... and the letter must be sent directly from the professor (though they may not be able to enforce it) so that you cannot tamper with the material in any way.

deltasigbn
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Re: Letters of recomendation question?

Postby deltasigbn » Wed Aug 04, 2010 3:01 pm

The letters are sealed, with a signature from the professor on the seals. So you think I can just send it in to LSAC like that?

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bk1
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Re: Letters of recomendation question?

Postby bk1 » Wed Aug 04, 2010 3:06 pm

deltasigbn wrote:The letters are sealed, with a signature from the professor on the seals. So you think I can just send it in to LSAC like that?


I believe so.

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Hannibal
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Re: Letters of recomendation question?

Postby Hannibal » Wed Aug 04, 2010 5:25 pm

bk1 wrote:Your professors should send them, though if they give them to you already sealed then it is fine (because you should be waiving your right to see them).

You can submit paper applications to most schools (visit their websites), but I don't see why you would.


Say what? One of my professors said she'd send me a copy. Why would this be a problem?

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im_blue
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Re: Letters of recomendation question?

Postby im_blue » Wed Aug 04, 2010 5:39 pm

Hannibal wrote:
bk1 wrote:Your professors should send them, though if they give them to you already sealed then it is fine (because you should be waiving your right to see them).

You can submit paper applications to most schools (visit their websites), but I don't see why you would.


Say what? One of my professors said she'd send me a copy. Why would this be a problem?

You can waive your right to access the LOR as part of your educational record after you enroll, while still getting a copy from your recommender.

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kazu
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Re: Letters of recomendation question?

Postby kazu » Thu Aug 05, 2010 2:06 am

deltasigbn wrote:The other question I have is, is it absolutely necessary to use LSAC to apply to law school?


I think for some schools it is, for others it isn't. However fees for applying with a paper application for those schools that do allow it is usually more expensive than going through LSAC - I think it's somewhere around $100 for a non-LSAC application vs. $80 for applying through LSAT.

I also get the distinct impression that schools prefer electronic apps to paper ones.

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bk1
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Re: Letters of recomendation question?

Postby bk1 » Thu Aug 05, 2010 2:26 am

Hannibal wrote:
bk1 wrote:Your professors should send them, though if they give them to you already sealed then it is fine (because you should be waiving your right to see them).

You can submit paper applications to most schools (visit their websites), but I don't see why you would.


Say what? One of my professors said she'd send me a copy. Why would this be a problem?


Because law schools will view the LORs as possibly biased. There is no real reason why you need to see it so you should waive your right.

Adu
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Re: Letters of recomendation question?

Postby Adu » Thu Aug 05, 2010 11:47 am

Speaking of LOR, I have a quick question. Most schools require these to come from a professor unless you were out of school they will accept one from a co worker or a boss. In my situation i am going to school as well as working full time. What should I do? I was told to take several classes with the same professor, but none of my classes are tought by someone that I have already taken!

nickbentley
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Re: Letters of recomendation question?

Postby nickbentley » Thu Aug 05, 2010 12:25 pm

I'm in the same situation...

I work full time and take about half of my classes online...

I do not know any of my professors well enough to use them as a recommender.

What should I do?

Adu
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Re: Letters of recomendation question?

Postby Adu » Thu Aug 05, 2010 12:26 pm

nickbentley wrote:I'm in the same situation...

I work full time and take about half of my classes online...

I do not know any of my professors well enough to use them as a recommender.

What should I do?


So far I got one from a manager that I work with that knows how ambitious I am. I also read online that you can contact professors from several years ago who know you pretty well.

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acrossthelake
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Re: Letters of recomendation question?

Postby acrossthelake » Thu Aug 05, 2010 1:20 pm

Adu wrote:Speaking of LOR, I have a quick question. Most schools require these to come from a professor unless you were out of school they will accept one from a co worker or a boss. In my situation i am going to school as well as working full time. What should I do? I was told to take several classes with the same professor, but none of my classes are tought by someone that I have already taken!


It doesn't have to be a professor you've had twice...one of mine is my thesis advisor, who I only had once.

Adu
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Re: Letters of recomendation question?

Postby Adu » Thu Aug 05, 2010 1:46 pm

acrossthelake wrote:
Adu wrote:Speaking of LOR, I have a quick question. Most schools require these to come from a professor unless you were out of school they will accept one from a co worker or a boss. In my situation i am going to school as well as working full time. What should I do? I was told to take several classes with the same professor, but none of my classes are tought by someone that I have already taken!


It doesn't have to be a professor you've had twice...one of mine is my thesis advisor, who I only had once.


The advisor at my school had said that, but there's got to be another way to obtain a LOR. I thought about contacting a professor I had while I was attending the community college before I transferred to a University. What do you think?

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acrossthelake
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Re: Letters of recomendation question?

Postby acrossthelake » Thu Aug 05, 2010 1:50 pm

Adu wrote:
acrossthelake wrote:
Adu wrote:Speaking of LOR, I have a quick question. Most schools require these to come from a professor unless you were out of school they will accept one from a co worker or a boss. In my situation i am going to school as well as working full time. What should I do? I was told to take several classes with the same professor, but none of my classes are tought by someone that I have already taken!


It doesn't have to be a professor you've had twice...one of mine is my thesis advisor, who I only had once.


The advisor at my school had said that, but there's got to be another way to obtain a LOR. I thought about contacting a professor I had while I was attending the community college before I transferred to a University. What do you think?


It's less about which professor is writing it, but what they can say in the content of the letter. Your advisor probably said that just because it gives your professor more time to know you and more to say. Two of mine are from professors I had twice, which is part of why I got to know each of them fairly well. If you think that professor can speak well about your academic strengths, that will work.

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TommyK
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Re: Letters of recomendation question?

Postby TommyK » Thu Aug 05, 2010 1:56 pm

Adu wrote:
acrossthelake wrote:
Adu wrote:Speaking of LOR, I have a quick question. Most schools require these to come from a professor unless you were out of school they will accept one from a co worker or a boss. In my situation i am going to school as well as working full time. What should I do? I was told to take several classes with the same professor, but none of my classes are tought by someone that I have already taken!


It doesn't have to be a professor you've had twice...one of mine is my thesis advisor, who I only had once.


The advisor at my school had said that, but there's got to be another way to obtain a LOR. I thought about contacting a professor I had while I was attending the community college before I transferred to a University. What do you think?


Whoever you think really is able to speak to your abilities that law schools look for - ability to synthesize, dissect, write, think critically, and work hard.

Typically community college teachers aren't able to speak to that very well. But there probably are situations when they can. I'm using my history professor with whom I had my senior capstone course. He wanted to co-publish my senior thesis in an academic journal, so he's able to attest to most of those abilities.

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Jack Smirks
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Re: Letters of recomendation question?

Postby Jack Smirks » Thu Aug 05, 2010 1:57 pm

I have a quick question, what's up with the signature line on the LOR form that says something about by signing it you waive the right to access it from your law school records or something like that. Should I be signing that? I don't really even understand what the fuck it's talking about but I've just been signing it just in case.

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acrossthelake
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Re: Letters of recomendation question?

Postby acrossthelake » Thu Aug 05, 2010 2:01 pm

naterj wrote:I have a quick question, what's up with the signature line on the LOR form that says something about by signing it you waive the right to access it from your law school records or something like that. Should I be signing that? I don't really even understand what the fuck it's talking about but I've just been signing it just in case.


Yes. Definitely sign it. You in general have a legal right to read things like your recommendation letter after you start attending the institution---by signing, you waive away that access. The point is that you writers should be able to write without fear that you will read the content and by signing it you allow that. Law school(med school, undergrad, etc.) admissions committees strongly prefer that you sign it, and often regard the lack of signing as suspect.

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Jack Smirks
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Re: Letters of recomendation question?

Postby Jack Smirks » Thu Aug 05, 2010 2:06 pm

acrossthelake wrote:
naterj wrote:I have a quick question, what's up with the signature line on the LOR form that says something about by signing it you waive the right to access it from your law school records or something like that. Should I be signing that? I don't really even understand what the fuck it's talking about but I've just been signing it just in case.


Yes. Definitely sign it. You in general have a legal right to read things like your recommendation letter after you start attending the institution---by signing, you waive away that access. The point is that you writers should be able to write without fear that you will read the content and by signing it you allow that. Law school(med school, undergrad, etc.) admissions committees strongly prefer that you sign it, and often regard the lack of signing as suspect.

Fuck I don't think I signed one of them because I figured it wasn't a big deal. Now I feel like an idiot.

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acrossthelake
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Re: Letters of recomendation question?

Postby acrossthelake » Thu Aug 05, 2010 2:10 pm

naterj wrote:
acrossthelake wrote:
naterj wrote:I have a quick question, what's up with the signature line on the LOR form that says something about by signing it you waive the right to access it from your law school records or something like that. Should I be signing that? I don't really even understand what the fuck it's talking about but I've just been signing it just in case.


Yes. Definitely sign it. You in general have a legal right to read things like your recommendation letter after you start attending the institution---by signing, you waive away that access. The point is that you writers should be able to write without fear that you will read the content and by signing it you allow that. Law school(med school, undergrad, etc.) admissions committees strongly prefer that you sign it, and often regard the lack of signing as suspect.

Fuck I don't think I signed one of them because I figured it wasn't a big deal. Now I feel like an idiot.


I take it you didn't need to do this for undergrad? Oh well, not much you can do now. They might not notice.

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Jack Smirks
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Re: Letters of recomendation question?

Postby Jack Smirks » Thu Aug 05, 2010 2:13 pm

acrossthelake wrote:
naterj wrote:
acrossthelake wrote:
naterj wrote:I have a quick question, what's up with the signature line on the LOR form that says something about by signing it you waive the right to access it from your law school records or something like that. Should I be signing that? I don't really even understand what the fuck it's talking about but I've just been signing it just in case.


Yes. Definitely sign it. You in general have a legal right to read things like your recommendation letter after you start attending the institution---by signing, you waive away that access. The point is that you writers should be able to write without fear that you will read the content and by signing it you allow that. Law school(med school, undergrad, etc.) admissions committees strongly prefer that you sign it, and often regard the lack of signing as suspect.

Fuck I don't think I signed one of them because I figured it wasn't a big deal. Now I feel like an idiot.


I take it you didn't need to do this for undergrad? Oh well, not much you can do now. They might not notice.

How big of a deal is it, should I like not even use that recommendation now? I have back ups.

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acrossthelake
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Re: Letters of recomendation question?

Postby acrossthelake » Thu Aug 05, 2010 2:15 pm

naterj wrote:How big of a deal is it, should I like not even use that recommendation now? I have back ups.


No idea. I don't know anyone who has ever not signed it, so I've never known the reaction. I mean, it's a soft...softs typically don't really matter too much.

http://www.top-law-schools.com/letters-of-recommendation.html wrote:When submitting letters of recommendation, LSAC as well as many law school’s individual forms give the option of waiving your right to see your letters after they have been sent to the law schools. Admissions officers strongly favor letters of recommendations from applicants who have waived their right to see the completed letter since the main purpose of letters of recommendation is to provide a candid assessment of your abilities. The waiver assures the admissions committee that the letter is a true objective evaluation of the applicant and that the applicant has in no way indirectly influenced the final recommendation. If you choose not to waive your right, you may run the risk of the admissions committee placing less weight on the letters of recommendation that you have submitted without signing the waiver.

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Jack Smirks
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Re: Letters of recomendation question?

Postby Jack Smirks » Thu Aug 05, 2010 2:19 pm

acrossthelake wrote:
naterj wrote:How big of a deal is it, should I like not even use that recommendation now? I have back ups.


No idea. I don't know anyone who has ever not signed it, so I've never known the reaction. I mean, it's a soft...softs typically don't really matter too much.

http://www.top-law-schools.com/letters-of-recommendation.html wrote:When submitting letters of recommendation, LSAC as well as many law school’s individual forms give the option of waiving your right to see your letters after they have been sent to the law schools. Admissions officers strongly favor letters of recommendations from applicants who have waived their right to see the completed letter since the main purpose of letters of recommendation is to provide a candid assessment of your abilities. The waiver assures the admissions committee that the letter is a true objective evaluation of the applicant and that the applicant has in no way indirectly influenced the final recommendation. If you choose not to waive your right, you may run the risk of the admissions committee placing less weight on the letters of recommendation that you have submitted without signing the waiver.

I'm a fucking idiot. Thanks for the heads up though.

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Re: Letters of recomendation question?

Postby Pip » Thu Aug 05, 2010 5:09 pm

While I'm glad to see all these people trying to follow the rules. I would suggest another thing.

Find a school that wants the letters signed and sealed by the prof, sent to them by you along with the other material...give those letters to a pool of professors you think you want to use. When you get the letter from them open it and see what they say. Do that for 5 or 6 profs and then find the ones that are giving you the best recommendation, now give those the ones that you want sent to the school you really are going to apply to.

Never trust a professor, you have no idea what they really think about you and could blast you out of the sky and you would never know it. Trust no one.

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acrossthelake
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Re: Letters of recomendation question?

Postby acrossthelake » Thu Aug 05, 2010 5:38 pm

Pip wrote:While I'm glad to see all these people trying to follow the rules. I would suggest another thing.

Find a school that wants the letters signed and sealed by the prof, sent to them by you along with the other material...give those letters to a pool of professors you think you want to use. When you get the letter from them open it and see what they say. Do that for 5 or 6 profs and then find the ones that are giving you the best recommendation, now give those the ones that you want sent to the school you really are going to apply to.

Never trust a professor, you have no idea what they really think about you and could blast you out of the sky and you would never know it. Trust no one.


Wow. Just wow.

ETA: If you can't trust that professor, the professor probably wasn't a good candidate to ask anyway.




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