Advice on Receiving Accommodations for LSAT?

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ssanders
Posts: 7
Joined: Thu Jul 01, 2010 5:53 pm

Advice on Receiving Accommodations for LSAT?

Postby ssanders » Thu Jul 01, 2010 6:11 pm

Hello all...

I'm looking for advice on where to find affordable testing for cognitive impairments which LSAC would recognize. I'm well aware (especially from reading posts on this and other law forums) how hard it is to receive accommodations from LSAC, so it would be great to be able to get advice from someone who has successfully done so.

I was diagnosed in high school with dyslexia, mild dysgraphia, and ADHD. While there are obviously medications that help with ADHD, the only thing that really works for dyslexia is additional time. When it comes to dense, complicated/technical texts, I often have to read things about a dozen times to really sort out what it is I'm reading. Needless to say, this puts me at a disadvantage when it comes to the LSAT (which is a shame, because I am a fan of logical reasoning, arguments, spotting fallacies, etc).

I'm looking to take the LSAT in June of 2011, but the soonest I could get in for testing through my school is in September of this year. From what I've read, many people find themselves appealing denials from LSAC and some appeal up to a year. Because of this, I would love to try to find another alternative but it is hard to locate local doctors with the right credentials and tests.

I had found one woman who seemed like she would be able to do it, but she didn't quite have the specific test version that LSAC requires for psychoeducational batteries. When I look for other doctors (using google), it is nearly impossible to figure out if they are a legitimate service or someone that just wants my money; and money is another thing, as some tests range upwards of $4,000.

Any advice you guys can share regarding this would be appreciated. Realistically, I expect that I'll just be forced to take it through my school, but my hope is that I have missed something or haven't considered some alternative option.

Also, if you have received accommodations, I would love to hear your experiences on: (i) how did you find someone to test you, (ii) how far in advance did you receive the correct testing, (iii) what did the test consist of, (iv) did LSAC deny you/did you appeal, and (v) what did accommodations consist of (I can't seem to find information regarding whether or not it is a flat-rate amount of time added to the general time allotment or if it varies depending on severity of disability).


Apologies in advance for the long read (I realize the irony).

03121202698008
Posts: 3002
Joined: Fri Jul 17, 2009 2:07 am

Re: Advice on Receiving Accommodations for LSAT?

Postby 03121202698008 » Thu Jul 01, 2010 6:15 pm

I know I've read a post or two where someone got accommodated testing before...maybe try searching while you wait for others to answer. I do know they put an asterisk next to your score so schools may basically look at is not a "real" score.

ssanders
Posts: 7
Joined: Thu Jul 01, 2010 5:53 pm

Re: Advice on Receiving Accommodations for LSAT?

Postby ssanders » Thu Jul 01, 2010 6:34 pm

blowhard wrote:I know I've read a post or two where someone got accommodated testing before...maybe try searching while you wait for others to answer. I do know they put an asterisk next to your score so schools may basically look at is not a "real" score.


I'll definitely do another search to see if I missed anything, but last time I checked, all the topics I read were more along the lines of people talking about getting accommodations (not so much how or any details, just that they got it), or people asking information on how to get accommodations (which lead to more generic LSAC information).

Knowing me, I could have skipped over something. If I find anything, I'll post back in here, otherwise I'd definitely appreciate information.

As for the asterisk, while it sounds scary, I have found that every admissions representative I have asked about it says it absolutely doesn't affect chances (including a couple friends who are admissions reps and would, I believe, definitely let me know if I should avoid it). The general consensus seems to be to just "get a good LSAT score." If that means accommodations, so be it.

Personally, even if there is some sort of risk of causing a blemish next to my score, I would rather have an asterisk and an accompanying explanation via addendum than risk getting an extremely low score and not even get looked at. It is definitely not an easy choice, though, and is one that I've had to really fight with myself about :? .

Thanks for the reply =)

lebroniousjames
Posts: 116
Joined: Fri Jul 16, 2010 10:21 pm

Re: Advice on Receiving Accommodations for LSAT?

Postby lebroniousjames » Thu Sep 30, 2010 10:54 am

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