Would you sell your family's legacy for law school?

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paz
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Re: Would you sell your family's legacy for law school?

Postby paz » Wed Jul 14, 2010 12:16 am

Stanford4Me wrote:
lonerightly wrote:
rad law wrote:
Stanford4Me wrote:Do the natives of Rhodesia suffer from Kwashiorkor? That's gotta lower property values.

Rhodesia used to grow and export a ton of food, but now a third of the county is on outside food aid. Mugabe FTW.


Rhodesian beef was actually at one time some of the highest quality in the world.

--ImageRemoved--


haha.

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Grizz
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Re: Would you sell your family's legacy for law school?

Postby Grizz » Wed Jul 14, 2010 12:16 am

I see your Mugabe and raise you:




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jayn3
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Re: Would you sell your family's legacy for law school?

Postby jayn3 » Wed Jul 14, 2010 12:16 am

Stanford4Me wrote:
lonerightly wrote:
rad law wrote:
Stanford4Me wrote:Do the natives of Rhodesia suffer from Kwashiorkor? That's gotta lower property values.

Rhodesia used to grow and export a ton of food, but now a third of the county is on outside food aid. Mugabe FTW.


Rhodesian beef was actually at one time some of the highest quality in the world.

image

nononono

--ImageRemoved--

lonerightly
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Re: Would you sell your family's legacy for law school?

Postby lonerightly » Wed Jul 14, 2010 12:20 am

--ImageRemoved--
IBTL

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jayn3
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Re: Would you sell your family's legacy for law school?

Postby jayn3 » Wed Jul 14, 2010 12:21 am

you can't ibtl your own thread dear.

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Stanford4Me
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Re: Would you sell your family's legacy for law school?

Postby Stanford4Me » Wed Jul 14, 2010 12:22 am

jayn3 wrote:you can't ibtl your own thread dear.

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Merr
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Re: Would you sell your family's legacy for law school?

Postby Merr » Wed Jul 14, 2010 12:22 am

mpasi wrote:Mugabe is supposed to magically reverse the primary and secondary implications that hundreds of years of British colonialism left behind in not even a third of the time...right.


Other leaders have done that, or at least done a lot better job of it, in other countries.

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paz
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Re: Would you sell your family's legacy for law school?

Postby paz » Wed Jul 14, 2010 12:26 am

Merr wrote:
mpasi wrote:Mugabe is supposed to magically reverse the primary and secondary implications that hundreds of years of British colonialism left behind in not even a third of the time...right.


Other leaders have done that, or at least done a lot better job of it, in other countries.


name them.

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Merr
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Re: Would you sell your family's legacy for law school?

Postby Merr » Wed Jul 14, 2010 12:27 am

paz wrote:
Merr wrote:
mpasi wrote:Mugabe is supposed to magically reverse the primary and secondary implications that hundreds of years of British colonialism left behind in not even a third of the time...right.


Other leaders have done that, or at least done a lot better job of it, in other countries.


name them.


http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/2059518.stm

Similar to Mugabe in many ways...except successful.

and another.

http://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/ ... e-kuan-yew

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mpasi
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Re: Would you sell your family's legacy for law school?

Postby mpasi » Wed Jul 14, 2010 12:37 am

Merr wrote:
paz wrote:
Merr wrote:
mpasi wrote:Mugabe is supposed to magically reverse the primary and secondary implications that hundreds of years of British colonialism left behind in not even a third of the time...right.


Other leaders have done that, or at least done a lot better job of it, in other countries.


name them.


http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/2059518.stm

Similar to Mugabe in many ways...except successful.

and another.

http://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/ ... e-kuan-yew


Two, out of how many leaders of former British and Dutch colonies cum third world nations? Can anyone say exceptions? And never mind that the circumstances and consequences have been incredibly different. Generalizing the issue and using Google won't get you far.

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Grizz
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Re: Would you sell your family's legacy for law school?

Postby Grizz » Wed Jul 14, 2010 12:39 am

mpasi wrote:Two, out of how many leaders of former British and Dutch colonies cum third world nations? Can anyone say exceptions? And never mind that the circumstances and consequences have been incredibly different. Generalizing the issue and using Google won't get you far.


Africans didn't need Europeans to teach them how to kill, slaughter, and enslave each other. They did give them some pretty cool weapons to do so with, though.

HTH

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mpasi
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Re: Would you sell your family's legacy for law school?

Postby mpasi » Wed Jul 14, 2010 12:43 am

rad law wrote:
mpasi wrote:Mugabe is supposed to magically reverse the primary and secondary implications that hundreds of years of British colonialism left behind in not even a third of the time...right.


Lulz at your attempt to even remotely say something good about Robert Mugabe.



LULZ at you not knowing the difference between making an objective observation and giving a compliment.

Burger in a can
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Re: Would you sell your family's legacy for law school?

Postby Burger in a can » Wed Jul 14, 2010 12:43 am

rad law wrote:
mpasi wrote:Two, out of how many leaders of former British and Dutch colonies cum third world nations? Can anyone say exceptions? And never mind that the circumstances and consequences have been incredibly different. Generalizing the issue and using Google won't get you far.


Africans didn't need Europeans to teach them how to kill, slaughter, and enslave each other. They did give them some pretty cool weapons to do so with, though.

HTH



--ImageRemoved--

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mpasi
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Re: Would you sell your family's legacy for law school?

Postby mpasi » Wed Jul 14, 2010 12:47 am

rad law wrote:
mpasi wrote:Two, out of how many leaders of former British and Dutch colonies cum third world nations? Can anyone say exceptions? And never mind that the circumstances and consequences have been incredibly different. Generalizing the issue and using Google won't get you far.


Africans didn't need Europeans to teach them how to kill, slaughter, and enslave each other. They did give them some pretty cool weapons to do so with, though.

HTH


Yes, doing what every other culture did during those times totally pwns the damage Europeans did. Never mind that one was obviously worse than the other, and left behind a clusterfuck of poverty, famine, and social unrest in its wake. You're right.

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Merr
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Re: Would you sell your family's legacy for law school?

Postby Merr » Wed Jul 14, 2010 12:49 am

mpasi wrote:
Merr wrote:
paz wrote:
Merr wrote:
Other leaders have done that, or at least done a lot better job of it, in other countries.


name them.


http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/2059518.stm

Similar to Mugabe in many ways...except successful.

and another.

http://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/ ... e-kuan-yew


Two, out of how many leaders of former British and Dutch colonies cum third world nations? Can anyone say exceptions? And never mind that the circumstances and consequences have been incredibly different. Generalizing the issue and using Google won't get you far.


Those are just two examples...and I am really not discussing the Dutch here.

Look at the numerous Caribbean countries that were essentially British Slave plantations that are now doing very well.

On top of that India and Ghana are also both leaps and bounds ahead Zimbabwe in no small part due to Ghandhi/Nehru and Nkrumah. Botswana and Namibia are also doing better then their neighbor.

Though I do see what you are saying. You believe circumstances and consequences > human agency. I believe human agency makes for favorable circumstances and consequences. Thus why, in large part, countries in the same geographic area with somewhat similar circumstances at decolonization like Malaysia and Burma and Ghana and Sierra Leone have had such different outcomes.

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Grizz
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Re: Would you sell your family's legacy for law school?

Postby Grizz » Wed Jul 14, 2010 12:50 am

mpasi wrote:
rad law wrote:
mpasi wrote:Mugabe is supposed to magically reverse the primary and secondary implications that hundreds of years of British colonialism left behind in not even a third of the time...right.


Lulz at your attempt to even remotely say something good about Robert Mugabe.



LULZ at you not knowing the difference between making an objective observation and giving a compliment.


I forgot how hard it is to not forcibly redistribute land without compensation, stifle democratic processes, decimate the Rhodesian/Zimbabwean economy, and commit massive human rights abuses.

Didn't say he had to be a savior, but at the very least, he could have not done the above. LULZ.

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Grizz
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Re: Would you sell your family's legacy for law school?

Postby Grizz » Wed Jul 14, 2010 12:52 am

mpasi wrote:Yes, doing what every other culture did during those times totally pwns the damage Europeans did. Never mind that one was obviously worse than the other, and left behind a clusterfuck of poverty, famine, and social unrest in its wake. You're right.


lol wut?

Blame whitey!
Last edited by Grizz on Wed Jul 14, 2010 12:54 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Grizz
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Re: Would you sell your family's legacy for law school?

Postby Grizz » Wed Jul 14, 2010 12:54 am

Merr wrote:On top of that India and Ghana are also both leaps and bounds ahead Zimbabwe in no small part due to Ghandhi/Nehru and Nkrumah. Botswana and Namibia are also doing better then their neighbor.


I'd also add Kenya.

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mpasi
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Re: Would you sell your family's legacy for law school?

Postby mpasi » Wed Jul 14, 2010 12:57 am

rad law wrote:
mpasi wrote:
rad law wrote:
mpasi wrote:Mugabe is supposed to magically reverse the primary and secondary implications that hundreds of years of British colonialism left behind in not even a third of the time...right.


Lulz at your attempt to even remotely say something good about Robert Mugabe.



LULZ at you not knowing the difference between making an objective observation and giving a compliment.


I forgot how hard it is to not forcibly redistribute land without compensation, stifle democratic processes, decimate the Rhodesian/Zimbabwean economy, and commit massive human rights abuses.

Didn't say he had to be a savior, but at the very least, he could have not done the above. LULZ.



Where did I say Mugabe was a good leader? I don't think that, but I do think it's stupid to expect any leader to turn that shit around in 30 years.

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Grizz
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Re: Would you sell your family's legacy for law school?

Postby Grizz » Wed Jul 14, 2010 12:59 am

mpasi wrote:Where did I say Mugabe was a good leader? I don't think that, but I do think it's stupid to expect any leader to turn that shit around in 30 years.


"Not turning things around" is an understatement of the grossest magnitude w/r/t what is happening in that country.

Again, I forgot how hard it is to not forcibly redistribute land without compensation, stifle democratic processes, decimate the Rhodesian/Zimbabwean economy, and commit massive human rights abuses.

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mpasi
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Re: Would you sell your family's legacy for law school?

Postby mpasi » Wed Jul 14, 2010 1:03 am

Merr wrote:
Those are just two examples...and I am really not discussing the Dutch here.

Look at the numerous Caribbean countries that were essentially British Slave plantations that are now doing very well.

On top of that India and Ghana are also both leaps and bounds ahead Zimbabwe in no small part due to Ghandhi/Nehru and Nkrumah. Botswana and Namibia are also doing better then their neighbor.

Though I do see what you are saying. You believe circumstances and consequences > human agency. I believe human agency makes for favorable circumstances and consequences. Thus why, in large part, countries in the same geographic area with somewhat similar circumstances at decolonization like Malaysia and Burma and Ghana and Sierra Leone have had such different outcomes.



I see what you're saying as well, and agree to some extent. However, you honestly can't think that Haiti (pre-earthquake), Martinique, Aruba, and Jamaica are "doing very well", can you? Have you looked at the GDP numbers for the Caribbean nations? And even if they are favorable, how much of that benefits the sons and daughters of the oppressed? My issue with what you posted earlier is that you don't account for after-effects of colonialism.

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mpasi
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Re: Would you sell your family's legacy for law school?

Postby mpasi » Wed Jul 14, 2010 1:07 am

rad law wrote:
mpasi wrote:Where did I say Mugabe was a good leader? I don't think that, but I do think it's stupid to expect any leader to turn that shit around in 30 years.


"Not turning things around" is an understatement of the grossest magnitude w/r/t what is happening in that country.

Again, I forgot how hard it is to not forcibly redistribute land without compensation, stifle democratic processes, decimate the Rhodesian/Zimbabwean economy, and commit massive human rights abuses.




I do believe I answered your Google results with the "I don't think Mugabe is a good leader" remark I posted earlier. It's time to Google more facts about the country, girlfriend.
Last edited by mpasi on Wed Jul 14, 2010 1:08 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Stanford4Me
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Re: Would you sell your family's legacy for law school?

Postby Stanford4Me » Wed Jul 14, 2010 1:07 am

Someone answer me this:

How does an 86 year old man have a 17 year old son?
How can a man who starves his country get tickets to the World Cup?
Have you seen where he freaking lives?

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eandy
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Re: Would you sell your family's legacy for law school?

Postby eandy » Wed Jul 14, 2010 1:09 am

Structural adjustment ftl

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Merr
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Re: Would you sell your family's legacy for law school?

Postby Merr » Wed Jul 14, 2010 1:09 am

mpasi wrote:
Merr wrote:
Those are just two examples...and I am really not discussing the Dutch here.

Look at the numerous Caribbean countries that were essentially British Slave plantations that are now doing very well.

On top of that India and Ghana are also both leaps and bounds ahead Zimbabwe in no small part due to Ghandhi/Nehru and Nkrumah. Botswana and Namibia are also doing better then their neighbor.

Though I do see what you are saying. You believe circumstances and consequences > human agency. I believe human agency makes for favorable circumstances and consequences. Thus why, in large part, countries in the same geographic area with somewhat similar circumstances at decolonization like Malaysia and Burma and Ghana and Sierra Leone have had such different outcomes.



I see what you're saying as well, and agree to some extent. However, you honestly can't think that Haiti (pre-earthquake), Martinique, Aruba, and Jamaica are "doing very well", can you? Have you looked at the GDP numbers for the Caribbean nations? And even if it is favorable, how much of that benefits the sons and daughters of the oppressed? My issue with what you posted earlier is that you don't account for after-effects of colonialism.


One I am not discussing the French. Their form of colonialism was/is a different beast entirely, but even there Human agency holds up as Senegal and Benin are much better off then Niger or Ivory Coast.

As to the Caribbean I have looked at GDP and HDI and have to say The Bahamas, Antigua and Barbuda, Trinidad, and Barbados among others are doing quite well all cases of government policy and human agency. Additionally, in all of these countries the sons and daughters of former slaves and indentured servants make up the vast, vast majority of the population have control at all levels of government and, in general, are the ones reaping the benefits.
Last edited by Merr on Wed Jul 14, 2010 1:11 am, edited 2 times in total.




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