Why is this the case?

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irish017
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Why is this the case?

Postby irish017 » Fri Jun 04, 2010 2:18 am

Every and I mean every single lawyer I have ever talked to has said that it really doesn't matter all that much where you go to law school and that the most important thing is networking?

It seems like these lawyers disagree with what seems to be the consensus on these boards.

Note: These lawyers I speak of range from Harvard through tier 1 to tier 2 all the way to tier 4.

Thoughts?

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bk1
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Re: Why is this the case?

Postby bk1 » Fri Jun 04, 2010 2:21 am

One thought: pre-ITE?

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PDaddy
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Re: Why is this the case?

Postby PDaddy » Fri Jun 04, 2010 2:24 am

They and you are absolutely correct. I am working with a very respected firm in my town right now, and working against a very well respected firm, as well. I have met many lawyers on both sides, and have had the opportunity to meet many in my lifetime. I know I am not at all unique in this regard.

The consensus is that the law school you attend only matters when you are applying, when and if you are transferring, and when you seek your first job out of school. I can guarantee you that once you're working nobody cares where you went to school. People only care about your skills.

Unfortunately for many, people who attend lower-ranked schools are often better-skilled lawyers. But this isn't always the case. Harvard and the rest produce some kick-ass lawyers, of course, but so do the Pepperdines, Syracuses and Wayne States. Graduates from lower-ranked schools just don't tend to get the bigLaw jobs right out of law school.

Keep the debt down, go where you can be happy and thrive, and enjoy your career. If you are a go-getter, you can get a great legal education from just about any American law school, even some of the schools that suck overall. But don't be stupid about it, either. If you can get into a prestigious school, you should go there.
Last edited by PDaddy on Fri Jun 04, 2010 2:36 am, edited 3 times in total.

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A'nold
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Re: Why is this the case?

Postby A'nold » Fri Jun 04, 2010 2:25 am

People on this website are about 100% first job focused, so that is where a lot of the anti prestigeous school mentalities come from. I am almost 100% positive that being bright and networking will get you extremely far in this field. BUT, if you think about it, you are far more likely to be bright and clever if you get into a great school. This is not across the board, just more generally. I mean, if you tell me that I have the choice to hire a Harvard Law student or a Cooley Law student without knowing anything more, it's going to be the Harvard Law student 100% of the time.

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MusicNutMeggie
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Re: Why is this the case?

Postby MusicNutMeggie » Fri Jun 04, 2010 6:12 am

A'nold wrote:People on this website are about 100% first job focused, so that is where a lot of the anti prestigeous school mentalities come from. I am almost 100% positive that being bright and networking will get you extremely far in this field. BUT, if you think about it, you are far more likely to be bright and clever if you get into a great school. This is not across the board, just more generally. I mean, if you tell me that I have the choice to hire a Harvard Law student or a Cooley Law student without knowing anything more, it's going to be the Harvard Law student 100% of the time.


Credited.

You also have to remember that some older lawyers you're talking to went to law school pre-rankings, which was a whole different world. Also, as always, regionalism is a huge factor, as is your preference for biglaw v. mid-size or small firms (or starting your own).

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angiej
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Re: Why is this the case?

Postby angiej » Fri Jun 04, 2010 7:47 am

This is what I hear from the attorneys I work with and all of the other attorneys who are encouraging me to go to the nearest law school (which happens to be T4) so that I can continue to work for them while in law school:

Law school does not matter as long as you have good job prospects (ie. networking, as mentioned by above poster). If you do not already have something lined up, then you may have difficulty finding your first job (only your first job) because a lot of firms only recruit from a few of the higher ranked schools, so if your not attending one of those schools that are regularly recruited from, you will have extra work to do t get on that firm's radar.

But the census among all I have talked to, is that rank and prestige of law school really only matter when trying to get your foot in the door for summer internships and the FIRST job. Beyond that, its about your mad legal skills. :lol:

However, its also important to realize that if you can't get your foot in the door of a good legal gig after law school due to your TTTT then everything may spiral because it will then be even harder to be on other firm's radars if you can't say you have worked at {insert firm name here}.

So for first job/summer internship:

Higher ranked/prestige trumps lower ranked/little prestige.

After first job (assuming you have had lawyer experience):
Work experience/legal skills trump all else.




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