Starting law school with a newborn

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angioletto
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Re: Starting law school with a newborn

Postby angioletto » Wed May 12, 2010 10:56 am

musicfor18 wrote:
legalized wrote:
Public assistance. It can take care of food and medical insurance, and student loans shouldn't count as income since that has to be repaid and is a loan, not income.


Thanks for all this fantastic and thoughtful input! Re: public assistance....From my research, it seems we won't be eligible for any public assistance unless I'm working at least 20 hours a week during school, which I'm not willing to do. (No point going to law school only to do a terrible job because I'm working). Do you know something I don't?


That doesn't sound right to me. What state are you in and where did you get this info?

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kittenmittons
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Re: Starting law school with a newborn

Postby kittenmittons » Wed May 12, 2010 10:58 am

Should have gone with a dog

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lostjake
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Re: Starting law school with a newborn

Postby lostjake » Wed May 12, 2010 1:56 pm

angioletto wrote:
musicfor18 wrote:
legalized wrote:
Public assistance. It can take care of food and medical insurance, and student loans shouldn't count as income since that has to be repaid and is a loan, not income.


Thanks for all this fantastic and thoughtful input! Re: public assistance....From my research, it seems we won't be eligible for any public assistance unless I'm working at least 20 hours a week during school, which I'm not willing to do. (No point going to law school only to do a terrible job because I'm working). Do you know something I don't?


That doesn't sound right to me. What state are you in and where did you get this info?


Please tell me that someone is not suggesting the OP goes on welfare to go to law school...

angioletto
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Re: Starting law school with a newborn

Postby angioletto » Wed May 12, 2010 2:02 pm

lostjake wrote:
angioletto wrote:
musicfor18 wrote:
legalized wrote:
Public assistance. It can take care of food and medical insurance, and student loans shouldn't count as income since that has to be repaid and is a loan, not income.


Thanks for all this fantastic and thoughtful input! Re: public assistance....From my research, it seems we won't be eligible for any public assistance unless I'm working at least 20 hours a week during school, which I'm not willing to do. (No point going to law school only to do a terrible job because I'm working). Do you know something I don't?


That doesn't sound right to me. What state are you in and where did you get this info?


Please tell me that someone is not suggesting the OP goes on welfare to go to law school...


No. Not all public assistance = welfare.

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Janus
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Re: Starting law school with a newborn

Postby Janus » Wed May 12, 2010 2:35 pm

There's a lot of good advice on this thread.

I'll be starting school this fall with an almost 3 year old. I envy the person on this tread who said their child sleeps from 7-7. I can't get my kid to bed before 10:00pm. (We are hoping to solve this problem prior to the fall.)

I'm going to South Carolina commuting from Charleston. I spoke with a former student (male) before committing to SC and he also commuted from Charlotte, NC, to South Carolina and he had a newborn the summer before starting law school. His wife was working as a lawyer in Charlotte. He managed to survive and graduated second in the class. So, going to school while having children is doable.

South Carolina said they could give me a blanket increase in cost of living roughly equal to the cost of childcare and also an increase for commuting. So, it doesn't seem financials will be a problem for me. I'm kind of surprised different schools have different policies on this since the COLs are set my the government for each school.

From a mother's perspective, you will have it easier as a father. That being said, your wife will more than likely need an outlet for adult interaction after being home with an infant all day. If you are studying, you won't be able to provide the interaction and attention she may be looking for when you arrive home. (I was only home on maternity leave for 8 weeks and I just about went crazy.) Getting a job and putting the baby in daycare may be a option she'll want to consider after being home for awhile. But, everyone is different and she may enjoy her days at home. I'm sure she can also find some meet and greets and social groups for young mom's. It depends how adventurous/outgoing she is.

Having kids and going to school can be an advantage (or at least I'd like to think so). Parent's have to be more disciplined and treat law school as if it is a job and not like it is undergrad (though I don't think you can compare the difficulty of undergrad to law school). We may have a leg-up as far as time management is concerned.

Good luck to all of the parents starting law school this fall. I'm super excited myself.

legalized
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Re: Starting law school with a newborn

Postby legalized » Wed May 12, 2010 4:20 pm

musicfor18 wrote:
legalized wrote:
Public assistance. It can take care of food and medical insurance, and student loans shouldn't count as income since that has to be repaid and is a loan, not income.


Thanks for all this fantastic and thoughtful input! Re: public assistance....From my research, it seems we won't be eligible for any public assistance unless I'm working at least 20 hours a week during school, which I'm not willing to do. (No point going to law school only to do a terrible job because I'm working). Do you know something I don't?


Students can get food stamps working 20 hours a week (it's a pittance though, depending on how much they make, my brother tried for it when he was getting shafted with hours at a retail job while in college and not getting parental help, and the amount they tried to give him made him laugh at them and tell them they can keep it).

But that is when you don't have a child.

If you have a minor child, the mother and child (particularly since the child is not here yet) for sure can get medical, and everyone in the child's household (that buys food together) should be able to get food. This is with or without working.

20 hours a week minimum is for childless students.

People will think negatively of you, but negative public opinion didn't stop the banks and whoever else from taking their millions and billions in bailouts from the government. The only help the government provides to the little guy is SBA loans, public assistance, and student loans (which are actually a form of public assistance, except that they are invested in someone who produces an increased educational and skill level that is a benefit to society, whereas someone on public assistance that is given and not loaned, can sit there and suck it in without producing/becoming any asset to society, hence the negative opinions). If you are using it as a temporary measure to get to higher ground for you and your family, then that is what it is intended for.

You can also try what I am attempting to do, which is getting a high enough lsat for a full or significant scholarship somewhere so that most of the federal loans can be used for family living expenses. However it sounds like you have already made your bed and know what school you are going to already, so I did not mention that before because that ship has already sailed for you, it seems.

legalized
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Re: Starting law school with a newborn

Postby legalized » Wed May 12, 2010 4:45 pm

angioletto wrote:
lostjake wrote:
angioletto wrote:
musicfor18 wrote:Thanks for all this fantastic and thoughtful input! Re: public assistance....From my research, it seems we won't be eligible for any public assistance unless I'm working at least 20 hours a week during school, which I'm not willing to do. (No point going to law school only to do a terrible job because I'm working). Do you know something I don't?


That doesn't sound right to me. What state are you in and where did you get this info?


Please tell me that someone is not suggesting the OP goes on welfare to go to law school...


No. Not all public assistance = welfare.


Yes it is and yes I did.

People go on welfare to sit on their asses and do nothing but smoke weed all day, people go on corporate welfare to do nothing but continue the same bad habits that made the artificial person (the corporate entity) need welfare in the first place...why the hell is law school a less noble reason to take welfare than what many are doing with the welfare they receive.

He has a wife who can, whether she feels like it or not, stay home with the kids all the way until kindergarten. When he gets out of ls, whether working as a lawyer or grumbling about wasted law school dollars at a McJob, they WILL still take money that funds public assistance out of his cheque, and then leave him to take care of his family on the rest of it. Whether he makes use of the assistance during law school or not. So why not benefit from an option that he has to pay for regardless?

The wife can babysit others' kids or sell avon or something to make even gas and incidentals money from home (after baby is 6 months or older).

I also suggested SEVERAL OTHER options because I was being unbiased and listing all possibilities I could think of that make sense for a complete family (mother and father in the same household). There are even more options I can think of (I am good with thinking on the fly and problem resolution...usually) but they do not apply to his situation.

The baby is due this summer. If they really want to save on daycare and need more than the student budget allows, I would even say depending on how tough they can be about it, the mother could, once the baby is past say 6 months, get a job working overnight somewhere so that she is only away from the child when HE can be there (and when it is minimal input from him since he will already be tired and have to head out for a full day the next day). 11pm to 7am type thing at a hotel or 24-hour restaurant or wherever. That cuts daycare costs down to zero. Or she stay home the first year roughly and head out to work next summer, and from there on out in his law school career. I am assuming whatever she does/use to do is not a professional type job, else he would have mentioned her going back to it after maternity leave, so.

He did not ask whether he should or not, he asked how to make it happen. I am good on RC so I answered the question asked and didn't use my first response as time to simply, or only, air my negative opinion of parents/parents who dare have some ambition in general. I did point out if I were in his situation I would just wait til the kid is school age, and have delayed my own rush into law school to get closer to school-age...but none of that means I can answer the question on how. I don't see what lostjake's incredulity is all about.

Fark-o-vision
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Re: Starting law school with a newborn

Postby Fark-o-vision » Wed May 12, 2010 4:54 pm

legalized wrote:
musicfor18 wrote:Thanks for all this fantastic and thoughtful input! Re: public assistance....From my research, it seems we won't be eligible for any public assistance unless I'm working at least 20 hours a week during school, which I'm not willing to do. (No point going to law school only to do a terrible job because I'm working). Do you know something I don't?


Yes it is and yes I did.

People go on welfare to sit on their asses and do nothing but smoke weed all day, people go on corporate welfare to do nothing but continue the same bad habits that made the artificial person (the corporate entity) need welfare in the first place...why the hell is law school a less noble reason to take welfare than what many are doing with the welfare they receive.

He has a wife who can, whether she feels like it or not, stay home with the kids all the way until kindergarten. When he gets out of ls, whether working as a lawyer or grumbling about wasted law school dollars at a McJob, they WILL still take money that funds public assistance out of his cheque, and then leave him to take care of his family on the rest of it. Whether he makes use of the assistance during law school or not. So why not benefit from an option that he has to pay for regardless?

The wife can babysit others' kids or sell avon or something to make even gas and incidentals money from home (after baby is 6 months or older).

I also suggested SEVERAL OTHER options because I was being unbiased and listing all possibilities I could think of that make sense for a complete family (mother and father in the same household). There are even more options I can think of (I am good with thinking on the fly and problem resolution...usually) but they do not apply to his situation.

The baby is due this summer. If they really want to save on daycare and need more than the student budget allows, I would even say depending on how tough they can be about it, the mother could, once the baby is past say 6 months, get a job working overnight somewhere so that she is only away from the child when HE can be there (and when it is minimal input from him since he will already be tired and have to head out for a full day the next day). 11pm to 7am type thing at a hotel or 24-hour restaurant or wherever. That cuts daycare costs down to zero. Or she stay home the first year roughly and head out to work next summer, and from there on out in his law school career. I am assuming whatever she does/use to do is not a professional type job, else he would have mentioned her going back to it after maternity leave, so.

He did not ask whether he should or not, he asked how to make it happen. I am good on RC so I answered the question asked and didn't use my first response as time to simply, or only, air my negative opinion of parents/parents who dare have some ambition in general. I did point out if I were in his situation I would just wait til the kid is school age, and have delayed my own rush into law school to get closer to school-age...but none of that means I can answer the question on how. I don't see what lostjake's incredulity is all about.
[/quote][/quote]

Jesus. I don't remember the last time I've seen a person care so little about the mothers well-being. I'm sure it was unintentional, but it sounds like you're advocating this guy tell his wife to live without sleep.

I'll be doing the same thing as the OP. However, my baby won't be born until October. Because I'm going to law school in the area my parents have offered to let my wife and baby stay with them more or less rent free. Savings will cover incidental expenses and my wife will have CA disability through January. Because of the specifics of my situation I think going this year will be easier than waiting a year. I'd take a careful, careful look at your own circumstances before making a decision.

legalized
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Re: Starting law school with a newborn

Postby legalized » Wed May 12, 2010 4:56 pm

Angioletto and musicfor... when it comes to government agencies and salesmen, you will never get full and useful information if you do not ask a little thing called The Right Question.

If you ask if you and your wife can get food stamps etc. if you are a student, they will tell you yes, if you are working 20 hours.

If you ask if you can get medical and other assistance for your wife and your unborn child if neither of you have jobs, they will tell you yes, how much depends on family income. If you are not working, and she is not working, and an employed person doesn't live in your house, obviously the family income is zero.

If you have life insurance, stocks, a car that is practically new and other unearned income/assets that a truly broke or poor person does not have (because when in a tight spot they would obviously liquidate these things first as much as possible before hitting up the public pot for a handout), then your income will be based on that.

If your last date of employment ended within about 60-90 days of applying for all the aid, you can potentially get emergency assistance while they figure out your eligibility for the rest of it.

Plenty of people with families to feed who lost their jobs in this economic MESS had to figure out public assistance as an option until they could do better.

Look how many have been living on unemployment and extended unemployment...another cheque cut from the government. People don't realize corporate welfare, student educational welfare, food stamps, WIC, medicaid, medicare, cash assistance, etc. are all handouts from the government, with only student loans requiring repayment. Knee-jerk reactions don't change the truth upon analysis.

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lostjake
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Re: Starting law school with a newborn

Postby lostjake » Wed May 12, 2010 4:57 pm

Just a tax payer who doesn't believe everyone and their brother should be on food stamps. If you're crippled up and can't work to support your kids thats one thing, if you're just "too good" to work at a hotel for $9/hr and need to go to law school after you have a kid or two maybe you should:

1. have thought about it before getting married and having kids
2. wait until you can afford it without my and everyone else's help

If you can't wait you should take out loans that YOU will have to pay back eventually. Almost half of the people in this country didn't pay income tax last year, how long do you think its going to be before we're Greece? Maybe an econ major can correct me.

legalized
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Re: Starting law school with a newborn

Postby legalized » Wed May 12, 2010 5:03 pm

Fark-o-vision wrote:
legalized wrote:
He has a wife who can, whether she feels like it or not, stay home with the kids all the way until kindergarten.
When he gets out of ls, whether working as a lawyer or grumbling about wasted law school dollars at a McJob, they WILL still take money that funds public assistance out of his cheque, and then leave him to take care of his family on the rest of it. Whether he makes use of the assistance during law school or not. So why not benefit from an option that he has to pay for regardless?

The wife can babysit others' kids or sell avon or something to make even gas and incidentals money from home (after baby is 6 months or older).

I also suggested SEVERAL OTHER options
because I was being unbiased and listing all possibilities I could think of that make sense for a complete family (mother and father in the same household). There are even more options I can think of (I am good with thinking on the fly and problem resolution...usually) but they do not apply to his situation.

The baby is due this summer. If they really want to save on daycare and need more than the student budget allows, I would even say depending on how tough they can be about it, the mother could, once the baby is past say 6 months, get a job working overnight somewhere so that she is only away from the child when HE can be there (and when it is minimal input from him since he will already be tired and have to head out for a full day the next day). 11pm to 7am type thing at a hotel or 24-hour restaurant or wherever. That cuts daycare costs down to zero. Or she stay home the first year roughly and head out to work next summer, and from there on out in his law school career. I am assuming whatever she does/use to do is not a professional type job, else he would have mentioned her going back to it after maternity leave, so.

He did not ask whether he should or not, he asked how to make it happen. I am good on RC so I answered the question asked and didn't use my first response as time to simply, or only, air my negative opinion of parents/parents who dare have some ambition in general. I did point out if I were in his situation I would just wait til the kid is school age, and have delayed my own rush into law school to get closer to school-age...but none of that means I can answer the question on how. I don't see what lostjake's incredulity is all about.


Jesus. I don't remember the last time I've seen a person care so little about the mothers well-being. I'm sure it was unintentional, but it sounds like you're advocating this guy tell his wife to live without sleep.

I'll be doing the same thing as the OP. However, my baby won't be born until October. Because I'm going to law school in the area my parents have offered to let my wife and baby stay with them more or less rent free. Savings will cover incidental expenses and my wife will have CA disability through January. Because of the specifics of my situation I think going this year will be easier than waiting a year. I'd take a careful, careful look at your own circumstances before making a decision.



1. RC is fundamental.

2. Read the large font AGAIN.

3. I have worked overnight at a b.s. job before when the lady doing the overnight care on the cheap as a supplement to her day job was the only childcare I could afford at the time. I did what I had to do as opposed to sitting on my ass saying woe is me. And I at one point worked both overnight and in the day and slept only 2-3 hours in the evening...that sort of relied on the night job not complaining about me being late to work sometimes, and wasn't sustainable over a long time, but it had to be done at that point.

I had no husband at the time. She does. However that is a last resort type of option, as the wording should have indicated.

Anyways.

angioletto
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Re: Starting law school with a newborn

Postby angioletto » Wed May 12, 2010 5:09 pm

I know how the system works and I know that different types of government assistance come from the same place. I am saying that there is a difference between a lazy bum who collects welfare because he doesn't want to work and someone who has a family and has decided to go to law school to better their lives but needs a little help paying for childcare.

If the OP is a FT student and his wife works FT and they meet income requirements they could qualify for assistance paying their childcare so the wife CAN work and bring in an income, rather than collecting welfare for doing nothing. She'd be collecting income and paying taxes to support the program that is helping her.

legalized
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Re: Starting law school with a newborn

Postby legalized » Wed May 12, 2010 5:20 pm

lostjake wrote:Just a tax payer who doesn't believe everyone and their brother should be on food stamps. If you're crippled up and can't work to support your kids thats one thing, if you're just "too good" to work at a hotel for $9/hr and need to go to law school after you have a kid or two maybe you should:

1. have thought about it before getting married and having kids
2. wait until you can afford it without my and everyone else's help

If you can't wait you should take out loans that YOU will have to pay back eventually. Almost half of the people in this country didn't pay income tax last year, how long do you think its going to be before we're Greece? Maybe an econ major can correct me.


Yes, and if you notice, I just suggested the overnight hotel type job for when the kid gets a bit older and was "scolded" for daring to have such a thought as well.

So I presented options across the spectrum and as we can see there will always be someone in the masses of Johnny Q Public that will be displeased. I'm being too easy on them, I'm being too harsh on them.

I mean, I personally decided to try and get a full scholarship or close to it (unless I'm going to a T10) and fit the rest of it inside student loans. However, it sounds to me like the OP is not getting a full scholarship or even 3/4, else he would already know where his money is coming from and this thread wouldn't exist. So that is why I gave the options.

Also, people could also say don't go to school at all until you can afford it without Uncle Sam's help.

Don't let a corporation continue to exist until the corporation can exist without my or Uncle Sam's help.

As I said the list goes on. Most students are not parents, so it's not like the phenomenon is sucking a drastic amount of money out of the welfare budget. But there are many parents on welfare who have barely any education to speak of, and those are the ones you should be worried about, because their lack of ambition assures they will sit on your pocket for years, if not generations, to come.

I can tell you now if i got into somewhere like harvard and couldn't hack it with our budget, I'd suck up the public assist with speed and gratuity and a big fat smile. And I'd be that one money-maker you never hear complaining about paying taxes. lol.

fwiw I understand your point, but you miss the point of bigger fish than this one poster who have gotten much bigger bailouts than some food and some pre/post natal care and you are powerless, and so am I, to even offend them or shame them because they are big corporations and can run their ship as tightly or as shoddily as they see fit. If they are sufficiently big enough then the gov't can't let them fail.

It's all the same thing. A gov't handout that does not have to be repaid.

I do agree though that people should try as hard as possible to fit their family life inside the student budget. However not all schools care to use their powers to adjust a parent's budget, and that creates an unfair burden on that student who must use the same budget as a childless single budding alcoholic. Given the unfairness inherent in dealing with humans who have more power than you over your daily affairs, that is why sociology and social help programs exist.

***********************************
OP if it gets really crazy, food banks are there, churches are there, goodwill and such are there...pride takes a fall when it comes to child's welfare.

But of course don't forget that the options in my first post are the best to try. Baby clothes and such if a baby shower and doting family members doesn't sort that out for you are available through the above and through people's moving and garage sales...so is cheap nice furniture. Estate sale = rich people selling perfectly useful things they don't want anymore. Moving and garage sales can be the same thing.

Craigslist is a friend in need...a friend indeed!

So are the little college kids in your school's UG who will do nearly anything for some gas and fun money. Except apparently NYU kids who i've seen on here think elevated school image means elevated price expectations...if your school's in NYC just find kids from a different less prestigious school.

But all my opinions in this thread stand.

legalized
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Re: Starting law school with a newborn

Postby legalized » Wed May 12, 2010 5:27 pm

angioletto wrote:I know how the system works and I know that different types of government assistance come from the same place. I am saying that there is a difference between a lazy bum who collects welfare because he doesn't want to work and someone who has a family and has decided to go to law school to better their lives but needs a little help paying for childcare.

If the OP is a FT student and his wife works FT and they meet income requirements they could qualify for assistance paying their childcare so the wife CAN work and bring in an income, rather than collecting welfare for doing nothing. She'd be collecting income and paying taxes to support the program that is helping her.


It didn't sound to me like his wife plans on working soon enough after the baby is born for this to be a viable option. People, it's about $1,000 in non-urban markets for a 6 week old child to go to a licensed child care provider. It is often cheaper or breaks even if you do the math for a non-professional mother to stay home with her newborn child, because often she is working just for the childcare, gas. and work clothes she needs to be at work.

For the progressives: i said newborn child. If the child is done breastfeeding then change "mother" to "parent".

(Had to add cause I knew they were in the wings waiting, lol).

melyanair
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Re: Starting law school with a newborn

Postby melyanair » Wed May 12, 2010 6:09 pm

This board has taken a bit of a tangent.

OP - I have a 19 month old, will be almost 2 when I start at FSU in the Fall. Hubby and I are making plans to share responsibities, and time table as much as possible. We also hope to be preggant again soon, maybe having #2 during 1L summer.

Children are a blessing, you will enjoy fatherhood, and all the best in law school.

Fark-o-vision
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Re: Starting law school with a newborn

Postby Fark-o-vision » Thu May 13, 2010 12:23 am

melyanair wrote:This board has taken a bit of a tangent.

OP - I have a 19 month old, will be almost 2 when I start at FSU in the Fall. Hubby and I are making plans to share responsibities, and time table as much as possible. We also hope to be preggant again soon, maybe having #2 during 1L summer.

Children are a blessing, you will enjoy fatherhood, and all the best in law school.


This makes sense.

As for waiting until you can afford it--I find that laughable advice coming from anyone on this board. We're just about all ready to sink 100K of government debt into a very questionable enterprise. Many of us will never pay of these loans. The ones that will will probably take time. The rest, the ones who are able to pay it back super quick, obviously made the right call. Part of these services are designed to help us get ahead. I don't think three hundred bucks a month for three years (roughly 10,800, right?) is really going to be a huge blow on top of the 40-50K the government never gets back from a quarter of us.

musicfor18
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Re: Starting law school with a newborn

Postby musicfor18 » Thu May 13, 2010 12:53 am

For those of you who are shocked at the idea of pursuing public assistance, please remember that I TRIED to get an increase in loans but was told it's not possible for anything related to family members (with the sole exception of childcare). My baby will be 2 months old when law school begins mid-August. We'll also be moving to a new city for me to go to school, which means that my wife will have to leave all of her work (she's a musician who teaches and also performs on a freelance basis). She's happy to work as much as she can, but it needs to be balanced with taking care of the baby. And there is no way I will expect her to work overnight shifts, etc. I care about her health.

I would prefer not to resort to public assistance but, if it means that my wife and child will be healthy, I believe it is acceptable. I intend to represent my situation truthfully when applying. If I am approved, then I assume that my situation falls within the acceptable use of the benefits.

musicfor18
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Re: Starting law school with a newborn

Postby musicfor18 » Thu May 13, 2010 12:59 am

legalized wrote:

I mean, I personally decided to try and get a full scholarship or close to it (unless I'm going to a T10) and fit the rest of it inside student loans. However, it sounds to me like the OP is not getting a full scholarship or even 3/4, else he would already know where his money is coming from and this thread wouldn't exist. So that is why I gave the options.


I did get a few full scholarship offers, but decided to go to a better school on a half-tuition scholarship. In any case, it really isn't relevant to this thread. Loans can only cover up to the official Cost of Attendance minus any scholarship given. This Cost of Attendance cannot include living expenses for family members (student only). So, even with a full ride, I would still only be eligible for loans to cover my own living expenses and would still be searching for a way to support my family during school.

guacamolation
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Re: Starting law school with a newborn

Postby guacamolation » Thu May 13, 2010 5:19 am

musicfor18 wrote:We'll also be moving to a new city for me to go to school, which means that my wife will have to leave all of her work (she's a musician who teaches and also performs on a freelance basis). She's happy to work as much as she can, but it needs to be balanced with taking care of the baby. And there is no way I will expect her to work overnight shifts, etc. I care about her health.


I dont know what sort of support system you've already got set up in LA, but I had friends who were really happy they stayed in married student housing for at least their first year in school. It might have been a little pricier than renting an apartment on their own in another part of town, but they were living among similarly situated people, so they had "insta-friends" and people really pitched together to help each other out (rotating babysitting so people had a chance for a date night, carpool to costco/split the purchases). plus you have the benefit of being close to campus so you arent spending much time commuting & your wife can take advantage of events at the school of music. just a thought.

angioletto
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Re: Starting law school with a newborn

Postby angioletto » Thu May 13, 2010 8:25 am

musicfor18 wrote:For those of you who are shocked at the idea of pursuing public assistance, please remember that I TRIED to get an increase in loans but was told it's not possible for anything related to family members (with the sole exception of childcare). My baby will be 2 months old when law school begins mid-August. We'll also be moving to a new city for me to go to school, which means that my wife will have to leave all of her work (she's a musician who teaches and also performs on a freelance basis). She's happy to work as much as she can, but it needs to be balanced with taking care of the baby. And there is no way I will expect her to work overnight shifts, etc. I care about her health.

I would prefer not to resort to public assistance but, if it means that my wife and child will be healthy, I believe it is acceptable. I intend to represent my situation truthfully when applying. If I am approved, then I assume that my situation falls within the acceptable use of the benefits.


There's nothing unreasonable about this.

Jerzeegirl
Posts: 79
Joined: Mon Dec 28, 2009 11:11 am

Re: Starting law school with a newborn

Postby Jerzeegirl » Thu May 13, 2010 9:19 am

Congrats! Very excited for you. Since you aren't the one actually having the baby, I think you'll be fine. As busy as you're going to be with school, remember to be supportive and understanding with your wife. The first three months can be brutal (healing after delivery, getting into a rhythm with feedings, up all night when the baby has colic/fever, post-partum depression etc etc). Law school is a lot of work, but taking care of a baby full time can be just as stressful and time consuming. Realize that your wife is going to need a break once in a while, and as tired as you feel when you get home from school, she's going to need you to take the baby for a bit so she can have time for herself. You don't need to put off school, but you need to work at understanding and communicating with each other so you aren't fighting all the time. Babies mean less sleep, less quiet, less money. . . Be ready for the fact that life isn't one of those cute diaper commercials.

As far as public assistance, its pretty much the simplest thing in the world. You go to social services, give detailed information on your situation, and THEY decide what you're eligible for. There is no guess work involved. No worries about what is or isn't legal. It varies a bit by state. I was on WIC during college. I saved a ton of money on groceries, diapers, formula etc. If you're struggling financially, you can get the application at the hospital when your wife delivers (again, this may vary by state). Don't give up on school just because finances are tight. And there is nothing wrong with public assistance. You can give up on law school because you feel guilty not having enough money to support the family, and take the $9/hr job with no benefits and wind up on public assistance anyway because you don't have enough of an education to make the money to support your family (vicious cycle). Either way you take the government's money. Why not do it for a good cause (the ability to adequately support your family in the future). And start good saving habits now, before baby comes. Clip coupons, use the library instead of the bookstore, buy baby clothes off season when they're at 50%, join parenting groups to save on sitters, and so on. Just don't drive yourself crazy. Things have a way of working out.

musicfor18
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Re: Starting law school with a newborn

Postby musicfor18 » Thu May 13, 2010 10:00 am

Thanks for the advice. Just to clarify, I'm not currently working a $9/hr job. I make about $50-55k/year in the non-profit management field. That said, I live in NYC where living is very expensive, so that's a very modest salary. We haven't been able to save tons of money and will need to spend a good deal of it on moving. My wife is also a professional, but in a field where you basically never makes lot of money, and where it takes a while to build up any work at all in a new city.

isaiah6v8
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Re: Starting law school with a newborn

Postby isaiah6v8 » Thu May 13, 2010 10:04 am

Sorry to get here late to the party, but I guess I will be the dissenting opinion on the question as to wait or not. Here are my thoughts, my daughter is now 15 months old, and I am starting in the fall. Having been through the newborn stage(my daughter was a very easy baby, btw.) I would not have wanted to be in school during that time, work was daunting enough (teacher, had to be at my school by 7:30 every morn.) School may be easier in terms of time management, but I suspect that it will be more taxing than teaching was. IF you can wait a year, if you are young, and it will not adversely effect your family, I would seriously considerate it. A couple of plusses if you wait, 1) I don't know your stats, but if you were intersted in trying to bump your LSAT, maybe you could get more scholly money, or even go to a better school, if desired 2)we all hope that in three years the economy and job market will be better off, but in waiting maybe you will get to see a clearer picture of future prospects 3)@19 months we feel okay with our daughter being in daycare a couple of days week while my wife works (she is a nurse) adding to income.

Anyway, it sounds like you are decided on attending, but I just thought I would share my two cents.

Jerzeegirl
Posts: 79
Joined: Mon Dec 28, 2009 11:11 am

Re: Starting law school with a newborn

Postby Jerzeegirl » Thu May 13, 2010 10:40 am

musicfor18 wrote:Thanks for the advice. Just to clarify, I'm not currently working a $9/hr job. I make about $50-55k/year in the non-profit management field. That said, I live in NYC where living is very expensive, so that's a very modest salary. We haven't been able to save tons of money and will need to spend a good deal of it on moving. My wife is also a professional, but in a field where you basically never makes lot of money, and where it takes a while to build up any work at all in a new city.


I hear you. As I said before, you aren't the one actually having the baby, so I think you'll be fine. I did it during undergrad and it wasn't the worst thing in the world. I'm borrowing money from friends and family to pay for my move. If you can find people to help with that aspect, it will definitely alleviate some of your stress. You may want to consider deferring for a year so your wife can adjust to new mommihood and maybe establish her career in whatever city you decide to settle in. I think it depends on your age. After 27, every year matters. Just my opinion. You may feel the cut-off is more like 30 or 35. Trust your instincts. Good luck with whatever you decide to do. I'm sure it will all work out.

legalized
Posts: 317
Joined: Thu Jan 21, 2010 3:45 am

Re: Starting law school with a newborn

Postby legalized » Thu May 13, 2010 11:26 am

musicfor18 wrote:
legalized wrote:

I mean, I personally decided to try and get a full scholarship or close to it (unless I'm going to a T10) and fit the rest of it inside student loans. However, it sounds to me like the OP is not getting a full scholarship or even 3/4, else he would already know where his money is coming from and this thread wouldn't exist. So that is why I gave the options.


I did get a few full scholarship offers, but decided to go to a better school on a half-tuition scholarship. In any case, it really isn't relevant to this thread. Loans can only cover up to the official Cost of Attendance minus any scholarship given. This Cost of Attendance cannot include living expenses for family members (student only). So, even with a full ride, I would still only be eligible for loans to cover my own living expenses and would still be searching for a way to support my family during school.


It can include expenses for a dependent child, since students cannot take children to class.

It is budgeted to cover housing, transportation, and food and related expenses like a computer that are all part of attending the school.

Talk to the Dean of Student Affairs or the Director of Financial Aid. I found out too late in UG that they could adjust budgets upward (didn't know that before) so I always had to live with just the maximum federal aid I qualified for (which wasn't always the max possible depending on what semester it was and what else was going on with me). But I had a full scholarship so that helped out a lot.




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