Wait another year or bite the bullet and try a transfer?

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half_farang
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Wait another year or bite the bullet and try a transfer?

Postby half_farang » Mon Apr 05, 2010 1:06 pm

So I have the classic sob story, I got rejected from my top choice and wait listed for my second.

I have a 3.79, and a 159.

I really didn't want to take the LSAT again because I thought my GPA would carry me further, but it seems like they don't give two shits about my GPA. I also have tons of extra curricular and internship experience and took a year off teaching abroad.

I did get accepted into some good schools, USD and Santa Clara (with a tiny scholarship) and I want to go into Public interest.

I don't really want to wait a year, and my dad is pushing me to get it over with so he can "stop worry about me."

What are my chances if I try to transfer from Santa Clara to Univ of Colorado or to UC Davis?

Should I just wait another year and retake my LSAT?

Kobe_Teeth
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Re: Wait another year or bite the bullet and try a transfer?

Postby Kobe_Teeth » Mon Apr 05, 2010 1:12 pm

I'm in a similar situation. I'm biting the bullet and going to a school that I will be very happy with graduating from but my eye will be on transferring. I'm opting to go because my personal life dictates I go now rather than later.

If you can wait - wait.

If you can't - don't.

narkizopoint
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Re: Wait another year or bite the bullet and try a transfer?

Postby narkizopoint » Mon Apr 05, 2010 1:15 pm

I retook and waited. Happy with my decision but I have/had a job and also knew going in that my LSAT score from the first time around was bunk. If you feel your LSAT was right around where you can score then don't wait. If you think it was a total fluke, wait (especially if pops is helping u foot the bill).

joonhp
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Re: Wait another year or bite the bullet and try a transfer?

Postby joonhp » Mon Apr 05, 2010 1:18 pm

i'm still waiting for this cycle to finish, but i'm taking the june exam...if i get high 160s or break 170 i will wait another year...if not i'll just stick with where this cycle takes me.

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kittenmittons
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Re: Wait another year or bite the bullet and try a transfer?

Postby kittenmittons » Mon Apr 05, 2010 1:22 pm

Never count on transfer

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traehekat
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Re: Wait another year or bite the bullet and try a transfer?

Postby traehekat » Mon Apr 05, 2010 1:25 pm

Just make sure if you end up at USD or Santa Clara that you will be happy with receiving your degree from there. Nothing wrong with wanting to transfer, but if you can't you have to make sure you will still be satisfied continuing your education at your current institution.

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dhg5004
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Re: Wait another year or bite the bullet and try a transfer?

Postby dhg5004 » Mon Apr 05, 2010 3:31 pm

Never count on transfer


Never count on your LSAT increasing either. You have way more control in allowing yourself to transfer by working your butt off and transfering after your first year. From what I have researched (and from what I have learned from 3 people who transfered after their first year) you need to be in the top 15% of your class after the first year.

I am in the same exact position as you are. I got a 155/3.3 and haven't gotten into the schools that I was hoping for. (Temple being my number 1...and still waiting to hear from Cardozo May program) - I also applied SUPER late (beginning of March, cuz I retook the LSAT in Feb.)

I have spoken to a ton of people the last few days and they all suggest going to NYLS (I got some $$ to go there) and think about transfering after my first year (crossing my fingers I can be in the top 15% of my class) to maybe Cardozo or Brooklyn law.

This story may cheer you up...one of a couple people I know...this girl attended Widener for her first year (154 LSAT) and her advisor told her she was too smart for the school...she was the top of most of her classes...so she applied to Fordham/Brooklyn after her first year...and got into Brooklyn...she graduated from there and now has a great job in NYC.

It CAN happen. You just have to work your butt off the first year! I would suggest you go to USD (which is a good school!) and then think about transferring. Whoever says transferring is a bad idea on this site is an idiot. Because it is easier to get into an upper tiered school already in to law school (they put muchhh less weight on your LSAT - they look more at your grades at the school you're coming from)

Hope that helps! Let me know what you do!

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kyle
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Re: Wait another year or bite the bullet and try a transfer?

Postby kyle » Mon Apr 05, 2010 3:36 pm

wait as long as you can. The economy sucks

joonhp
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Re: Wait another year or bite the bullet and try a transfer?

Postby joonhp » Mon Apr 05, 2010 3:56 pm

dhg5004 wrote:
Never count on transfer


Never count on your LSAT increasing either. You have way more control in allowing yourself to transfer by working your butt off and transfering after your first year. From what I have researched (and from what I have learned from 3 people who transfered after their first year) you need to be in the top 15% of your class after the first year.

I am in the same exact position as you are. I got a 155/3.3 and haven't gotten into the schools that I was hoping for. (Temple being my number 1...and still waiting to hear from Cardozo May program) - I also applied SUPER late (beginning of March, cuz I retook the LSAT in Feb.)

I have spoken to a ton of people the last few days and they all suggest going to NYLS (I got some $$ to go there) and think about transfering after my first year (crossing my fingers I can be in the top 15% of my class) to maybe Cardozo or Brooklyn law.

This story may cheer you up...one of a couple people I know...this girl attended Widener for her first year (154 LSAT) and her advisor told her she was too smart for the school...she was the top of most of her classes...so she applied to Fordham/Brooklyn after her first year...and got into Brooklyn...she graduated from there and now has a great job in NYC.

It CAN happen. You just have to work your butt off the first year! I would suggest you go to USD (which is a good school!) and then think about transferring. Whoever says transferring is a bad idea on this site is an idiot. Because it is easier to get into an upper tiered school already in to law school (they put muchhh less weight on your LSAT - they look more at your grades at the school you're coming from)

Hope that helps! Let me know what you do!


I'll have to take the complete opposite stance. When you get into law school almost EVERYONE works their tails off to do well. There is no guarantee you will be in the top 15 percent of your class no matter how hard you work. Sure it can happen, but is it likely? Probably not. I think you have a much better chance at improving your LSAT score and reapplying next cycle. The LSAT can be conquered...there are many more people who conquer the LSAT than end up transferring after placing in the top 15 percent of their class. The test blows...it's the devil...but with some serious hard work you can raise your score to the mid 160s no problem.

Also take into consideration that schools don't offer scholarship money to transfer candidates.

rando
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Re: Wait another year or bite the bullet and try a transfer?

Postby rando » Mon Apr 05, 2010 4:04 pm

joonhp wrote:
dhg5004 wrote:
Never count on transfer


Never count on your LSAT increasing either. You have way more control in allowing yourself to transfer by working your butt off and transfering after your first year. From what I have researched (and from what I have learned from 3 people who transfered after their first year) you need to be in the top 15% of your class after the first year.

I am in the same exact position as you are. I got a 155/3.3 and haven't gotten into the schools that I was hoping for. (Temple being my number 1...and still waiting to hear from Cardozo May program) - I also applied SUPER late (beginning of March, cuz I retook the LSAT in Feb.)

I have spoken to a ton of people the last few days and they all suggest going to NYLS (I got some $$ to go there) and think about transfering after my first year (crossing my fingers I can be in the top 15% of my class) to maybe Cardozo or Brooklyn law.

This story may cheer you up...one of a couple people I know...this girl attended Widener for her first year (154 LSAT) and her advisor told her she was too smart for the school...she was the top of most of her classes...so she applied to Fordham/Brooklyn after her first year...and got into Brooklyn...she graduated from there and now has a great job in NYC.

It CAN happen. You just have to work your butt off the first year! I would suggest you go to USD (which is a good school!) and then think about transferring. Whoever says transferring is a bad idea on this site is an idiot. Because it is easier to get into an upper tiered school already in to law school (they put muchhh less weight on your LSAT - they look more at your grades at the school you're coming from)

Hope that helps! Let me know what you do!


I'll have to take the complete opposite stance. When you get into law school almost EVERYONE works their tails off to do well. There is no guarantee you will be in the top 15 percent of your class no matter how hard you work. Sure it can happen, but is it likely? Probably not. I think you have a much better chance at improving your LSAT score and reapplying next cycle. The LSAT can be conquered...there are many more people who conquer the LSAT than end up transferring after placing in the top 15 percent of their class. The test blows...it's the devil...but with some serious hard work you can raise your score to the mid 160s no problem.

Also take into consideration that schools don't offer scholarship money to transfer candidates.


+ a lot.

you have a lot more control over LSAT than you do over first year grades. Not to mention top 15% doesn't guarantee you anything. It really depends on where you go and where you are transferring to. If you are going to a T4 and hoping to transfer T1+ you really should be in the top 3-5%.

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PlugInBaby
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Re: Wait another year or bite the bullet and try a transfer?

Postby PlugInBaby » Mon Apr 05, 2010 4:16 pm

joonhp wrote:
dhg5004 wrote:
Never count on transfer


Never count on your LSAT increasing either. You have way more control in allowing yourself to transfer by working your butt off and transfering after your first year. From what I have researched (and from what I have learned from 3 people who transfered after their first year) you need to be in the top 15% of your class after the first year.

I am in the same exact position as you are. I got a 155/3.3 and haven't gotten into the schools that I was hoping for. (Temple being my number 1...and still waiting to hear from Cardozo May program) - I also applied SUPER late (beginning of March, cuz I retook the LSAT in Feb.)

I have spoken to a ton of people the last few days and they all suggest going to NYLS (I got some $$ to go there) and think about transfering after my first year (crossing my fingers I can be in the top 15% of my class) to maybe Cardozo or Brooklyn law.

This story may cheer you up...one of a couple people I know...this girl attended Widener for her first year (154 LSAT) and her advisor told her she was too smart for the school...she was the top of most of her classes...so she applied to Fordham/Brooklyn after her first year...and got into Brooklyn...she graduated from there and now has a great job in NYC.

It CAN happen. You just have to work your butt off the first year! I would suggest you go to USD (which is a good school!) and then think about transferring. Whoever says transferring is a bad idea on this site is an idiot. Because it is easier to get into an upper tiered school already in to law school (they put muchhh less weight on your LSAT - they look more at your grades at the school you're coming from)

Hope that helps! Let me know what you do!


I'll have to take the complete opposite stance. When you get into law school almost EVERYONE works their tails off to do well. There is no guarantee you will be in the top 15 percent of your class no matter how hard you work. Sure it can happen, but is it likely? Probably not. I think you have a much better chance at improving your LSAT score and reapplying next cycle. The LSAT can be conquered...there are many more people who conquer the LSAT than end up transferring after placing in the top 15 percent of their class. The test blows...it's the devil...but with some serious hard work you can raise your score to the mid 160s no problem.

Also take into consideration that schools don't offer scholarship money to transfer candidates.


In addition LSAT prep materials and the test itself is FAR cheaper than tuition at any law school....the risk is less.

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dhg5004
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Re: Wait another year or bite the bullet and try a transfer?

Postby dhg5004 » Mon Apr 05, 2010 4:44 pm

It's dependent on the type of student one is. For me I will never be able to score 165+ on the LSAT. I took many practice exams and never reaching that score. Grades in school, on the other hand, when I applied myself I was able to get A's in all my courses from a top public university.

Why is it that everyone on this site thinks one can 'easily' score in the 160's on their LSAT? Less than 15% do so. Like I said I know three people who scored in the 150's and did well during their first year at school and transferred to a T2 / T1 school.

It also depends on where this person wants to work....USD is a good t2 school especially if one wants to practice in San Diego or the surrounding area. If you want to practice somewhere across the country it probably isn't the best idea to graduate from there though...

Waiting 1 more whole year is, in my opinion, ridiculous. One has to measure the opportunity cost behind making such a decision. I stick by my stance on working your ass off your first year and then weighing your options. Waiting a year to up your score a bit and increase your chances at a 'better' school seems silly to me. And it's definitely not guaranteed that you will be accepted to the school of your choice (i realize transferring isn't either - but I'd take my chances taking that route)

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firebreathingliberal
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Re: Wait another year or bite the bullet and try a transfer?

Postby firebreathingliberal » Mon Apr 05, 2010 5:00 pm

Unless you want to practice in San Diego then wait a year. You can spend the whole summer studying, take the Sept LSAT (providing you kill it) and end up looking at a whole other level of programs than where you are now. You get a 165 then Temple will be begging for you to attend (this might be an exaggeration). Plus you can get some sweet job to boost your softs. Build some houses for Habitat for Humanity or something, go rebuild New Orleans, or open a Center for Kids Who Can't Read Good (and who want to do other things good too).

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dp73816
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Re: Wait another year or bite the bullet and try a transfer?

Postby dp73816 » Mon Apr 05, 2010 5:07 pm

dhg5004 wrote:It's dependent on the type of student one is. For me I will never be able to score 165+ on the LSAT. I took many practice exams and never reaching that score. Grades in school, on the other hand, when I applied myself I was able to get A's in all my courses from a top public university.

Why is it that everyone on this site thinks one can 'easily' score in the 160's on their LSAT? Less than 15% do so. Like I said I know three people who scored in the 150's and did well during their first year at school and transferred to a T2 / T1 school.

It also depends on where this person wants to work....USD is a good t2 school especially if one wants to practice in San Diego or the surrounding area. If you want to practice somewhere across the country it probably isn't the best idea to graduate from there though...

Waiting 1 more whole year is, in my opinion, ridiculous. One has to measure the opportunity cost behind making such a decision. I stick by my stance on working your ass off your first year and then weighing your options. Waiting a year to up your score a bit and increase your chances at a 'better' school seems silly to me. And it's definitely not guaranteed that you will be accepted to the school of your choice (i realize transferring isn't either - but I'd take my chances taking that route)



+1 - I might be the minority, but I wholeheartedly agree. Waiting a year - in this economy, is simply not as feasible as it once was. I took it twice and had to cancel in the middle once, and ended up getting a 152 as my highest - after PTing in the 160's-170's. I had a lot of health problems that played a factor, but I nonetheless pushed through it and applied to a lot of schools all over the nation. Now, I'm either going to Rutgers (scholarship), UMiami, Notre Dame, or W&L at this point. My whole attitude was "screw waiting, im not putting a year of my life on hold for some test." I think it turned out ok.

rando
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Re: Wait another year or bite the bullet and try a transfer?

Postby rando » Mon Apr 05, 2010 5:08 pm

dhg5004 wrote:It's dependent on the type of student one is. For me I will never be able to score 165+ on the LSAT. I took many practice exams and never reaching that score. Grades in school, on the other hand, when I applied myself I was able to get A's in all my courses from a top public university.

Why is it that everyone on this site thinks one can 'easily' score in the 160's on their LSAT? Less than 15% do so. Like I said I know three people who scored in the 150's and did well during their first year at school and transferred to a T2 / T1 school.

It also depends on where this person wants to work....USD is a good t2 school especially if one wants to practice in San Diego or the surrounding area. If you want to practice somewhere across the country it probably isn't the best idea to graduate from there though...

Waiting 1 more whole year is, in my opinion, ridiculous. One has to measure the opportunity cost behind making such a decision. I stick by my stance on working your ass off your first year and then weighing your options. Waiting a year to up your score a bit and increase your chances at a 'better' school seems silly to me. And it's definitely not guaranteed that you will be accepted to the school of your choice (i realize transferring isn't either - but I'd take my chances taking that route)


It is great that you got all A's when you applied yourself. That has absolutely nothing to do with law school grades. Not to be rude, but you have no idea what you are talking about. People don't necessarily think it is easy to score in the 160's, they know that the LSAT is trainable. If you know you can't score higher that is one thing. But if you are truly trying to weigh the opportunity cost of your education, then waiting another year and scoring 5 points higher on the LSAT would do wonders for your future.

half_farang
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Re: Wait another year or bite the bullet and try a transfer?

Postby half_farang » Mon Apr 05, 2010 11:55 pm

PlugInBaby wrote:
joonhp wrote:
dhg5004 wrote:
Never count on transfer


Never count on your LSAT increasing either. You have way more control in allowing yourself to transfer by working your butt off and transfering after your first year. From what I have researched (and from what I have learned from 3 people who transfered after their first year) you need to be in the top 15% of your class after the first year.

I am in the same exact position as you are. I got a 155/3.3 and haven't gotten into the schools that I was hoping for. (Temple being my number 1...and still waiting to hear from Cardozo May program) - I also applied SUPER late (beginning of March, cuz I retook the LSAT in Feb.)

I have spoken to a ton of people the last few days and they all suggest going to NYLS (I got some $$ to go there) and think about transfering after my first year (crossing my fingers I can be in the top 15% of my class) to maybe Cardozo or Brooklyn law.

This story may cheer you up...one of a couple people I know...this girl attended Widener for her first year (154 LSAT) and her advisor told her she was too smart for the school...she was the top of most of her classes...so she applied to Fordham/Brooklyn after her first year...and got into Brooklyn...she graduated from there and now has a great job in NYC.

It CAN happen. You just have to work your butt off the first year! I would suggest you go to USD (which is a good school!) and then think about transferring. Whoever says transferring is a bad idea on this site is an idiot. Because it is easier to get into an upper tiered school already in to law school (they put muchhh less weight on your LSAT - they look more at your grades at the school you're coming from)

Hope that helps! Let me know what you do!


I'll have to take the complete opposite stance. When you get into law school almost EVERYONE works their tails off to do well. There is no guarantee you will be in the top 15 percent of your class no matter how hard you work. Sure it can happen, but is it likely? Probably not. I think you have a much better chance at improving your LSAT score and reapplying next cycle. The LSAT can be conquered...there are many more people who conquer the LSAT than end up transferring after placing in the top 15 percent of their class. The test blows...it's the devil...but with some serious hard work you can raise your score to the mid 160s no problem.

Also take into consideration that schools don't offer scholarship money to transfer candidates.


In addition LSAT prep materials and the test itself is FAR cheaper than tuition at any law school....the risk is less.




Wow. Thanks for the replies everyone! I've never tried a post before. I didn't really expect so many people to reply.

Well. The thing is, I really would like to end up somewhere in California, and San Diego and Santa Clara are both great places (those are the schools I got in to). So I WOULD be happy graduating from there.

On a different note, I do think I could up my LSAT score, at least from a 159 to a 162. This might give me some scholarship money from these same schools I got accepted into, or it would give me a chance at UC Davis.

However, the new education bill offers a good loan repayment plan for public interest people.

If you haven't read about it, everyone can check it out at: //www.law.georgetown.edu/news/releases/documents/Forgiveness_000.pdf

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firebreathingliberal
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Re: Wait another year or bite the bullet and try a transfer?

Postby firebreathingliberal » Tue Apr 06, 2010 12:14 am

Wow. Thanks for the replies everyone! I've never tried a post before. I didn't really expect so many people to reply.

Well. The thing is, I really would like to end up somewhere in California, and San Diego and Santa Clara are both great places (those are the schools I got in to). So I WOULD be happy graduating from there.

On a different note, I do think I could up my LSAT score, at least from a 159 to a 162. This might give me some scholarship money from these same schools I got accepted into, or it would give me a chance at UC Davis.

However, the new education bill offers a good loan repayment plan for public interest people.

If you haven't read about it, everyone can check it out at: //www.law.georgetown.edu/news/releases/documents/Forgiveness_000.pdf


Flame... you are a government agent aren't you?

half_farang
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Re: Wait another year or bite the bullet and try a transfer?

Postby half_farang » Tue Apr 06, 2010 1:42 am

firebreathingliberal wrote:
Wow. Thanks for the replies everyone! I've never tried a post before. I didn't really expect so many people to reply.

Well. The thing is, I really would like to end up somewhere in California, and San Diego and Santa Clara are both great places (those are the schools I got in to). So I WOULD be happy graduating from there.

On a different note, I do think I could up my LSAT score, at least from a 159 to a 162. This might give me some scholarship money from these same schools I got accepted into, or it would give me a chance at UC Davis.

However, the new education bill offers a good loan repayment plan for public interest people.

If you haven't read about it, everyone can check it out at: //www.law.georgetown.edu/news/releases/documents/Forgiveness_000.pdf


Flame... you are a government agent aren't you?


I can't quite tell if you are mocking me or being serious. I never was good a detecting internet emotions. In either case, I like to received good info and give out good info.

khanvalescent
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Re: Wait another year or bite the bullet and try a transfer?

Postby khanvalescent » Tue Apr 06, 2010 2:36 am

I see a lot of negative comments about deferring for a year. It is often characterized as a state of limbo where a person comes back from working all day at [big box service industry job] to eat many [unhealthy snack foods] within the [unpleasant room] of [relative]'s house. This template is possible, but there are many other wonderful options that we can choose to do with a year of our life.

Retake the LSAT and get into a school you want to.

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Richie Tenenbaum
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Re: Wait another year or bite the bullet and try a transfer?

Postby Richie Tenenbaum » Tue Apr 06, 2010 2:45 am

dhg5004 wrote:
Never count on transfer


Never count on your LSAT increasing either. You have way more control in allowing yourself to transfer by working your butt off and transfering after your first year.

dhg5004 wrote: Whoever says transferring is a bad idea on this site is an idiot. Because it is easier to get into an upper tiered school already in to law school (they put muchhh less weight on your LSAT - they look more at your grades at the school you're coming from)


:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

You win the "worst advice of the thread" award.

doomed123
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Re: Wait another year or bite the bullet and try a transfer?

Postby doomed123 » Tue Apr 06, 2010 3:03 am

Richie Tenenbaum wrote:
dhg5004 wrote:
Never count on transfer


Never count on your LSAT increasing either. You have way more control in allowing yourself to transfer by working your butt off and transfering after your first year.

dhg5004 wrote: Whoever says transferring is a bad idea on this site is an idiot. Because it is easier to get into an upper tiered school already in to law school (they put muchhh less weight on your LSAT - they look more at your grades at the school you're coming from)


:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

You win the "worst advice of the thread" award.


+180

Retaking the LSAT is much less risky (and costly) than going to a T2, paying thousands in tuition, and crossing your fingers that you'll end up at the top of your class.

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dhg5004
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Re: Wait another year or bite the bullet and try a transfer?

Postby dhg5004 » Tue Apr 06, 2010 8:42 am

It is great that you got all A's when you applied yourself. That has absolutely nothing to do with law school grades. Not to be rude, but you have no idea what you are talking about. People don't necessarily think it is easy to score in the 160's, they know that the LSAT is trainable. If you know you can't score higher that is one thing. But if you are truly trying to weigh the opportunity cost of your education, then waiting another year and scoring 5 points higher on the LSAT would do wonders for your future.



or it could do the polar opposite. The LSAT is trainable - as is the ability to succeed in law school.

you're right. spending 2 years of your life taking a test makes a ton of sense. i have spoken to numerous lawyers who have been in the industry for years...as well as recent law grads...and current law students. every single one of them would agree with my stance on transferring. Everyone on this forum seems to be obsessed with getting into "T14" schools and if one doesn't gain acceptance then they mind as well trash the whole law school idea.

USD is a good school with good career opportunities. Waiting an entire year with the hopes of increasing your LSAT a few points is utter nonsense. I don't see why everyone seems to be such a proponent of the idea. And rando what makes you so credible in regard to this topic?

I know two people who followed the exact route you are proposing...one went up 2 points, the other went down 1 point on the actual LSAT. Will that happen to you farang? Maybe, maybe not. But I don't see how waiting a year while crossing your fingers with the hopes of a 5 point raise will do you any good.

And to tell me I don't have 'any idea what I'm talking about' but to use 'not to be rude' as a precursor doesn't just erase the insulting remark. I'm guessing you work on the board of admissions at a T14 law school or something? Judging by your seemingly abundant knowledge on the topic...

If you do wait a year though I would definitely do something worthwhile in the meantime as firebreathingliberal suggests. Teachforamerica maybe or score a sweet job or something. Something to give the admissions office a reason why you took a year off instead of just spending a year studying for the LSAT.

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dhg5004
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Re: Wait another year or bite the bullet and try a transfer?

Postby dhg5004 » Tue Apr 06, 2010 8:49 am

+1 - I might be the minority, but I wholeheartedly agree. Waiting a year - in this economy, is simply not as feasible as it once was. I took it twice and had to cancel in the middle once, and ended up getting a 152 as my highest - after PTing in the 160's-170's. I had a lot of health problems that played a factor, but I nonetheless pushed through it and applied to a lot of schools all over the nation. Now, I'm either going to Rutgers (scholarship), UMiami, Notre Dame, or W&L at this point. My whole attitude was "screw waiting, im not putting a year of my life on hold for some test." I think it turned out ok.



I know many stories like this :) And I totally agree with the idea of 'screw waiting' - maybe because I have been out of undergrad since last May and find it difficult to imagine myself waiting 1 more whole year.

congrats on getting into good schools despite a lower LSAT! What is your top choice?

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Richie Tenenbaum
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Re: Wait another year or bite the bullet and try a transfer?

Postby Richie Tenenbaum » Tue Apr 06, 2010 9:28 am

dhg5004 wrote:
It is great that you got all A's when you applied yourself. That has absolutely nothing to do with law school grades. Not to be rude, but you have no idea what you are talking about. People don't necessarily think it is easy to score in the 160's, they know that the LSAT is trainable. If you know you can't score higher that is one thing. But if you are truly trying to weigh the opportunity cost of your education, then waiting another year and scoring 5 points higher on the LSAT would do wonders for your future.



or it could do the polar opposite. The LSAT is trainable - as is the ability to succeed in law school.

you're right. spending 2 years of your life taking a test makes a ton of sense. i have spoken to numerous lawyers who have been in the industry for years...as well as recent law grads...and current law students. every single one of them would agree with my stance on transferring. Everyone on this forum seems to be obsessed with getting into "T14" schools and if one doesn't gain acceptance then they mind as well trash the whole law school idea.

USD is a good school with good career opportunities. Waiting an entire year with the hopes of increasing your LSAT a few points is utter nonsense. I don't see why everyone seems to be such a proponent of the idea. And rando what makes you so credible in regard to this topic?

I know two people who followed the exact route you are proposing...one went up 2 points, the other went down 1 point on the actual LSAT. Will that happen to you farang? Maybe, maybe not. But I don't see how waiting a year while crossing your fingers with the hopes of a 5 point raise will do you any good.

And to tell me I don't have 'any idea what I'm talking about' but to use 'not to be rude' as a precursor doesn't just erase the insulting remark. I'm guessing you work on the board of admissions at a T14 law school or something? Judging by your seemingly abundant knowledge on the topic...

If you do wait a year though I would definitely do something worthwhile in the meantime as firebreathingliberal suggests. Teachforamerica maybe or score a sweet job or something. Something to give the admissions office a reason why you took a year off instead of just spending a year studying for the LSAT.


It sounds like you're trying to convince yourself more than your trying to convince others. If you cannot raise you LSAT score by a least a few points come test day after an additional few months of studying, then you aren't studying hard enough (or you had a complete meltdown on test day).

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rayiner
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Re: Wait another year or bite the bullet and try a transfer?

Postby rayiner » Tue Apr 06, 2010 9:44 am

The LSAT is not only trainable, but retakes are cheap and low risk.

Having taken 1L exams, I can tell you that I'd much rather sit through the LSAT again, which has the same format year after year, and which you can carefully practice for, then sit through 1L exams, where profs throw you curveballs and other students gun like crazy. I did well on my exams, but there were a number of things that came out of left field: our civ pro prof didn't really teach us the rules. I read glannons multiple choice supplement the night before. Turned out to be exactly like half the exam! Our crim prof only tested on the MPC. I got singed points for bringing up all this class material irrelevant to the MPC. Our torts prof wrote an exam that was like a giant logic game. Quickly diagramming it saved my ass.

There is an opportunity cost to retaking, but 5 points on the LSAT can easily cover it with scholarship money or a school with better opportunities. Most people I know that chose to retake were very happy with their decisions. One went up four points, which got her into a T14. Two went up six points, getting into T6 schools. One went up 8 points, and will be attending a T14 next year. Yes, a couple retook and didn't go up at all. Yes, that's hard, but they can go knowing they maximized their opportunity at this early and critical stage of their career.




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