JD/MHA

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daesonesb
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JD/MHA

Postby daesonesb » Tue Mar 30, 2010 3:19 pm

For those unfamiliar, an MHA is a Masters of Health Administration. It's generally a degree used by people who want to work in hospital administration, insurance, medical policy, etc.

For those who are familiar, what is your perception of the JD/MHA degree? I'm guessing one would have to pay more for it, and go to school for an extra year, but it does seem to have a distinct benefit. The medical field is growing faster than any other, and new regulation is going to mean that legal knowledge in administrators will be a huge plus. I would assume there are ample job opportunities for someone with a degree in this, and to me it sounds like an interesting area of the law.

Thoughts? Worth the extra year/extra money? Are MHA's generally necessary for working in this area?

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nick637
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Re: JD/MHA

Postby nick637 » Tue Mar 30, 2010 3:23 pm

daesonesb wrote:For those unfamiliar, an MHA is a Masters of Health Administration. It's generally a degree used by people who want to work in hospital administration, insurance, medical policy, etc.

For those who are familiar, what is your perception of the JD/MHA degree? I'm guessing one would have to pay more for it, and go to school for an extra year, but it does seem to have a distinct benefit. The medical field is growing faster than any other, and new regulation is going to mean that legal knowledge in administrators will be a huge plus. I would assume there are ample job opportunities for someone with a degree in this, and to me it sounds like an interesting area of the law.

Thoughts? Worth the extra year/extra money? Are MHA's generally necessary for working in this area?


I've actually talked with a recruiting director at a major healthcare system in IN. He said that they usually dont hire administrators without a clinical degree of some kind. FWIW

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daesonesb
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Re: JD/MHA

Postby daesonesb » Tue Mar 30, 2010 3:27 pm

nick637 wrote:
daesonesb wrote:For those unfamiliar, an MHA is a Masters of Health Administration. It's generally a degree used by people who want to work in hospital administration, insurance, medical policy, etc.

For those who are familiar, what is your perception of the JD/MHA degree? I'm guessing one would have to pay more for it, and go to school for an extra year, but it does seem to have a distinct benefit. The medical field is growing faster than any other, and new regulation is going to mean that legal knowledge in administrators will be a huge plus. I would assume there are ample job opportunities for someone with a degree in this, and to me it sounds like an interesting area of the law.

Thoughts? Worth the extra year/extra money? Are MHA's generally necessary for working in this area?


I've actually talked with a recruiting director at a major healthcare system in IN. He said that they usually dont hire administrators without a clinical degree of some kind. FWIW


By clinical degree, you mean MD?

I will rephrase and say that I only want to talk about accredited MHA degrees. There are usually only a couple of schools in a state (if any) that offer these.

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nick637
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Re: JD/MHA

Postby nick637 » Tue Mar 30, 2010 3:29 pm

daesonesb wrote:
nick637 wrote:
daesonesb wrote:For those unfamiliar, an MHA is a Masters of Health Administration. It's generally a degree used by people who want to work in hospital administration, insurance, medical policy, etc.

For those who are familiar, what is your perception of the JD/MHA degree? I'm guessing one would have to pay more for it, and go to school for an extra year, but it does seem to have a distinct benefit. The medical field is growing faster than any other, and new regulation is going to mean that legal knowledge in administrators will be a huge plus. I would assume there are ample job opportunities for someone with a degree in this, and to me it sounds like an interesting area of the law.

Thoughts? Worth the extra year/extra money? Are MHA's generally necessary for working in this area?


I've actually talked with a recruiting director at a major healthcare system in IN. He said that they usually dont hire administrators without a clinical degree of some kind. FWIW


By clinical degree, you mean MD?

I will rephrase and say that I only want to talk about accredited MHA degrees. There are usually only a couple of schools in a state (if any) that offer these.

thats correct. For more information I would suggest talking with a local health system admin if you dont find what your looking for here.

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daesonesb
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Re: JD/MHA

Postby daesonesb » Tue Mar 30, 2010 3:33 pm

nick637 wrote:
daesonesb wrote:
nick637 wrote:
daesonesb wrote:For those unfamiliar, an MHA is a Masters of Health Administration. It's generally a degree used by people who want to work in hospital administration, insurance, medical policy, etc.

For those who are familiar, what is your perception of the JD/MHA degree? I'm guessing one would have to pay more for it, and go to school for an extra year, but it does seem to have a distinct benefit. The medical field is growing faster than any other, and new regulation is going to mean that legal knowledge in administrators will be a huge plus. I would assume there are ample job opportunities for someone with a degree in this, and to me it sounds like an interesting area of the law.

Thoughts? Worth the extra year/extra money? Are MHA's generally necessary for working in this area?


I've actually talked with a recruiting director at a major healthcare system in IN. He said that they usually dont hire administrators without a clinical degree of some kind. FWIW


By clinical degree, you mean MD?

I will rephrase and say that I only want to talk about accredited MHA degrees. There are usually only a couple of schools in a state (if any) that offer these.

thats correct. For more information I would suggest talking with a local health system admin if you dont find what your looking for here.


I'm not thinking I will, lol.
I'm not sure that many schools even offer the JD/MHA. The first I saw of it was today on UW's website. A quick google search isn't bringing up many other schools that have it.

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toolshed
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Re: JD/MHA

Postby toolshed » Tue Mar 30, 2010 3:35 pm

daesonesb wrote:
nick637 wrote:
daesonesb wrote:For those unfamiliar, an MHA is a Masters of Health Administration. It's generally a degree used by people who want to work in hospital administration, insurance, medical policy, etc.

For those who are familiar, what is your perception of the JD/MHA degree? I'm guessing one would have to pay more for it, and go to school for an extra year, but it does seem to have a distinct benefit. The medical field is growing faster than any other, and new regulation is going to mean that legal knowledge in administrators will be a huge plus. I would assume there are ample job opportunities for someone with a degree in this, and to me it sounds like an interesting area of the law.

Thoughts? Worth the extra year/extra money? Are MHA's generally necessary for working in this area?


I've actually talked with a recruiting director at a major healthcare system in IN. He said that they usually dont hire administrators without a clinical degree of some kind. FWIW


By clinical degree, you mean MD?

I will rephrase and say that I only want to talk about accredited MHA degrees. There are usually only a couple of schools in a state (if any) that offer these.



I don't know that it is required, but I have heard similarly that something like an MD makes it MUCH easier to do. Anecdotally, though, I have a friend doing MHA at George Washington, and she says that a good portion of the graduates are able to secure jobs in hospitals/clinics/etc. Just probably a lot harder than a former doc that wants to make the transition to management.

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nick637
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Re: JD/MHA

Postby nick637 » Tue Mar 30, 2010 3:36 pm

I didn't specify that I was pursuing a JD/MHA, but I will probably follow up with a few questions about how useful the degree is as one of my top schools offers this as well. I can let you know what I find out if you want

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daesonesb
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Re: JD/MHA

Postby daesonesb » Tue Mar 30, 2010 3:41 pm

toolshed wrote:
daesonesb wrote:
nick637 wrote:
daesonesb wrote:For those unfamiliar, an MHA is a Masters of Health Administration. It's generally a degree used by people who want to work in hospital administration, insurance, medical policy, etc.

For those who are familiar, what is your perception of the JD/MHA degree? I'm guessing one would have to pay more for it, and go to school for an extra year, but it does seem to have a distinct benefit. The medical field is growing faster than any other, and new regulation is going to mean that legal knowledge in administrators will be a huge plus. I would assume there are ample job opportunities for someone with a degree in this, and to me it sounds like an interesting area of the law.

Thoughts? Worth the extra year/extra money? Are MHA's generally necessary for working in this area?


I've actually talked with a recruiting director at a major healthcare system in IN. He said that they usually dont hire administrators without a clinical degree of some kind. FWIW


By clinical degree, you mean MD?

I will rephrase and say that I only want to talk about accredited MHA degrees. There are usually only a couple of schools in a state (if any) that offer these.



I don't know that it is required, but I have heard similarly that something like an MD makes it MUCH easier to do. Anecdotally, though, I have a friend doing MHA at George Washington, and she says that a good portion of the graduates are able to secure jobs in hospitals/clinics/etc. Just probably a lot harder than a former doc that wants to make the transition to management.


Which is funny, because the average doctor doesn't have any management training. I don't mean this in a demeaning sense -- my mom is a doctor. However, I dont know that she'd be more qualified to work the financial or legal side of things than someone who has been trained as an admin would.

EDIT: I meant management of finances and legal issues. Clearly doctors have experience managing nurses, PA's etc. In the HR sense, they are likely to be much more qualified for the job than a freshly minted MHA is.
Last edited by daesonesb on Tue Mar 30, 2010 3:44 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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toolshed
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Re: JD/MHA

Postby toolshed » Tue Mar 30, 2010 3:41 pm

nick637 wrote:I didn't specify that I was pursuing a JD/MHA, but I will probably follow up with a few questions about how useful the degree is as one of my top schools offers this as well. I can let you know what I find out if you want


If the school you are looking at doesn't have a JD/MHA, and you know that you want to work in the health field as a lawyer, you may consider getting a JD/MPH as well. More broad, but it may help get your foot in the door somewhere over a straight JD.

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nick637
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Re: JD/MHA

Postby nick637 » Tue Mar 30, 2010 3:42 pm

toolshed wrote:
nick637 wrote:I didn't specify that I was pursuing a JD/MHA, but I will probably follow up with a few questions about how useful the degree is as one of my top schools offers this as well. I can let you know what I find out if you want


If the school you are looking at doesn't have a JD/MHA, and you know that you want to work in the health field as a lawyer, you may consider getting a JD/MPH as well. More broad, but it may help get your foot in the door somewhere over a straight JD.


interestingly, the school has both. i need to do some more research

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toolshed
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Re: JD/MHA

Postby toolshed » Tue Mar 30, 2010 3:45 pm

daesonesb wrote:
toolshed wrote:I don't know that it is required, but I have heard similarly that something like an MD makes it MUCH easier to do. Anecdotally, though, I have a friend doing MHA at George Washington, and she says that a good portion of the graduates are able to secure jobs in hospitals/clinics/etc. Just probably a lot harder than a former doc that wants to make the transition to management.


Which is funny, because the average doctor doesn't have any management training. I don't mean this in a demeaning sense -- my mom is a doctor. However, I dont know that she'd be more qualified to work the financial or legal side of things than someone who has been trained as an admin would.


I agree, I don't think it is the bulk of doctors that are cut out for it, but think of how many main hospital administrators there are in comparison to how many doctors. I think the ones that have the skill set for management tend to become department heads, then transfer up. Once you stop patient care on a regular basis and start down the path (like a Chief of Residents, Chief of Oncology, etc.), it just seems the natural progression to head towards the top.




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