Best Law School Laptop for the Money

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beach_terror
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Re: Best Law School Laptop for the Money

Postby beach_terror » Tue May 11, 2010 7:49 pm

Desert Fox wrote:
Matthies wrote:
savesthedayajb wrote:Dells always seem to last a long time for me. I have to format a few times but I've had my Inspiron1505 Core2Duo 2.0Ghz for 4 years now and it's running smoothly. Battery is shot to hell though.


I've always had good luck with Dells as well. Thing with Dells I learned early on was not to get their extended warranty cause 99% of the stuff I could fix/trouble shoot myself in less time than it would take me to figure out what the guy in India was telling me to do.


Worst thing ever? Knowing the problem your Dell has, and trying to convince some dude working for three cups of a rice a day do send you a replacement part. They will not deviate from the script.


Convincing those dudes has been my job at my college for 3 years.

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beach_terror
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Re: Best Law School Laptop for the Money

Postby beach_terror » Tue May 11, 2010 7:50 pm

3 Stripes wrote:Is a 1GB RAM enough for 3 years of law school?


Yeah, if you're just doing basic word processing/internet 1gb is fine.

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zeth006
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Re: Best Law School Laptop for the Money

Postby zeth006 » Tue May 11, 2010 7:52 pm

barkingbug wrote:
zeth006 wrote:Meh. The T410 is a heavy brick at 5.58 pounds. 13.13 x 9.41 x 1.09-1.26” dimensions means it's a quarter of an inch thicker than the MBP 13. I don't know about you, but for law school, thick and heavy are just flat out inconvenient and defeat the purpose of getting a notebook for mobility purposes. Plus the MBP 13 gets almost twice the battery life. That means I can just leave the charger at home.

Also it's pointless to rave about an i5 unless you're actually going to use its raw processing power to the fullest. I don't plan to. There are others here who may, in which case the Envy 14 may be preferred.

If I want to game, I have a desktop at home.

Hyperbole much? Do we really think that a pound and a quarter of an inch will make a laptop immobile? BTW, T410 starts at 5.0 pounds. My goal: exercise enough to lose one pound so that I can buy the T410 with dramatically better hardware at a much lower price. I suspect that i5s will be the norm at best in three years.

If weight and word processing are all that matters, there are probably better options than both MBP and Thinkpad.


The term "i5" is just a naming scheme. A moniker (albeit a confusing one) for a processor line. The initial i7s that were dispatched for the first HP Envy back in 2009 are drastically different from the current i5-540m's. The 1st generation i7-M processors produced boatloads of heating issues for HP Envy owners and rendered the Envy unable to be placed on the lap or even typed on without significant discomfort. To put things into perspective, the 1st gen HP Envy served a far more useful purpose as a frying pan than as a mobile machine. The even more surprising part is how the 2nd Gen i5-Ms despite their being "mere" i5s ended up outbenching the 1st gen i7s by leaps and bounds while solving most of the heating problems. That really should tell you that there's a lot more to a processor beyond whether it has an "i" and a "5" in the name.

The current generation i5s like all other CPUs in their time won't be "the norm" in 3 years. They'll become obsolete by future generations of processors released. Claiming otherwise would have been not much different from a Pentium I owner claiming, "Pentiums will become the norm at best in 3 years." Great. So they will. But "Pentium" is just a name for a processor line/architecture. After the Pentium I came II..then III...then IV...with each "Pentium" line differing drastically from each other in the clock speeds and technologies introduced.

As much as Intel prefer otherwise, they're still under constant pressure to upgrade their processor lines just about every year. Intel's already in the stages of releasing more details of Sandy Bridge. You can go ahead and and brag later that your i5 is the "norm" 3 years down the road. But 3 years later, your processor, like any processor 3 years before that time, will be "ancient." Before you know it, we'll be using notebooks with processors that don't rely on transistors but simply light transmission.

So you can keep on repeating the same old "far better hardware" talking points. It's as meaningful as claiming that Obama is a Socialist Communist. As long as this "far better hardware" (i.e. A newer CPU) doesn't produce any noticeable improvement in everyday applications, "far better hardware" from a practical standpoint becomes moot. It may be important to photo editors and video makers. But even the staunch gamer won't notice a major difference as devs themselves don't waste their time coding graphics processing functions for CPUs. It's inherently inefficient for CPUs to take over tasks traditionally reserved for GPUs.


P.S. For a performance machine, I see more potential in the HP Envy 14/15 line. At $999, I consider the Envy 14 far better suited for the T410's purpose. It's thin, about the same weight, and it has a real GPU that comes standard instead of a sorry Nvidia secondhand piece of junk for an extra $100. It'll be released soon and should come with the same specs as the Envy 15.

P.P.S. If it is true that 1gb (or even 2gb) is plenty enough for word-processing and internet, then it really makes me wonder again what purpose an i5 would serve beyond artificially jacking up a machine's price tag.

Tea&Coffee
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Re: Best Law School Laptop for the Money

Postby Tea&Coffee » Tue May 11, 2010 8:17 pm

So while we're sort of on the topic of Dells, what about the Studio 14z, or the new Dell Vostro 3300? (the new 13 incher with i3 intel). I've heard the old Vostros weren't great, but apparently these new ones are supposed to be better. Thanks!

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zeth006
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Re: Best Law School Laptop for the Money

Postby zeth006 » Tue May 11, 2010 9:28 pm

Tea&Coffee wrote:So while we're sort of on the topic of Dells, what about the Studio 14z, or the new Dell Vostro 3300? (the new 13 incher with i3 intel). I've heard the old Vostros weren't great, but apparently these new ones are supposed to be better. Thanks!


Doesn't look bad at all. Aluminum casing and super thin.

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kalvano
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Re: Best Law School Laptop for the Money

Postby kalvano » Tue May 11, 2010 9:53 pm

Desert Fox wrote:
Matthies wrote:
savesthedayajb wrote:Dells always seem to last a long time for me. I have to format a few times but I've had my Inspiron1505 Core2Duo 2.0Ghz for 4 years now and it's running smoothly. Battery is shot to hell though.


I've always had good luck with Dells as well. Thing with Dells I learned early on was not to get their extended warranty cause 99% of the stuff I could fix/trouble shoot myself in less time than it would take me to figure out what the guy in India was telling me to do.


Worst thing ever? Knowing the problem your Dell has, and trying to convince some dude working for three cups of a rice a day do send you a replacement part. They will not deviate from the script.



"Hi, my computer is having a problem..."

"OK the first thing we will be then doing is a complete system restore. Please be taking out your disc that you were received when you purchased your computer."

"My DVD drive quit working. I just need a new one."

"Put the disc in your CD drive and make sure to be saving any important information as we will be erasing everything."

"My CD drive doesn't work. It won't power on. I just need a new one."

"When the screen comes up, you will be telling it you want to do a completely new installation."

"You're not listening to me. I don't need to do a new install, and I couldn't even if I wanted to. My CD drive is broken."

"There is no need to be taking that tone with me, sir. I am just trying to help you. Now you will please be doing the re-installation please sir."

"I'd like to speak to your supervisor."

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zeth006
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Re: Best Law School Laptop for the Money

Postby zeth006 » Tue May 11, 2010 11:49 pm

Outsourced CSR=phail.

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mikehoe
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Re: Best Law School Laptop for the Money

Postby mikehoe » Tue May 11, 2010 11:59 pm

burvowski wrote:The MBP did not receive updates yesterday nor was there a MBA price drop.


oh yeah you're right, i made a mistake. :|

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kalvano
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Re: Best Law School Laptop for the Money

Postby kalvano » Wed May 12, 2010 12:02 am

mikehoe wrote:oh yeah you're right, i made a mistake. :|



Congratulations, your client is now out $4M / will spend the next 32 years in jail.

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superflush
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Re: Best Law School Laptop for the Money

Postby superflush » Wed May 12, 2010 12:05 am

HBK wrote:Let's keep it in the $500-$800 range guys. Thanks!


are you serious?

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Duralex
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Re: Best Law School Laptop for the Money

Postby Duralex » Wed May 12, 2010 8:35 am

It can be kept in that range, especially if you buy refurbed.

MB c2d 2gHz 1GB black (from "GainSaver" -- don't know the company) -- $686 (w/SuperDrive & airport)
3 year warranty for +$100 (prob. not applecare?)

http://www.gainsaver.com/Catalog/Detail ... ersion=103

MB c2d 2gHz 1GB white (from PowerMax, apple authorized reseller) -- $720

http://www.powermax.com/parts/show/c-u69952

Or eBay, which is where I got mine (but while this model was still newish and under the original extended warranty.)

barkingbug
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Re: Best Law School Laptop for the Money

Postby barkingbug » Wed May 12, 2010 9:09 am

zeth006 wrote:
barkingbug wrote:
zeth006 wrote:Meh. The T410 is a heavy brick at 5.58 pounds. 13.13 x 9.41 x 1.09-1.26” dimensions means it's a quarter of an inch thicker than the MBP 13. I don't know about you, but for law school, thick and heavy are just flat out inconvenient and defeat the purpose of getting a notebook for mobility purposes. Plus the MBP 13 gets almost twice the battery life. That means I can just leave the charger at home.

Also it's pointless to rave about an i5 unless you're actually going to use its raw processing power to the fullest. I don't plan to. There are others here who may, in which case the Envy 14 may be preferred.

If I want to game, I have a desktop at home.

Hyperbole much? Do we really think that a pound and a quarter of an inch will make a laptop immobile? BTW, T410 starts at 5.0 pounds. My goal: exercise enough to lose one pound so that I can buy the T410 with dramatically better hardware at a much lower price. I suspect that i5s will be the norm at best in three years.

If weight and word processing are all that matters, there are probably better options than both MBP and Thinkpad.


The term "i5" is just a naming scheme. A moniker (albeit a confusing one) for a processor line. The initial i7s that were dispatched for the first HP Envy back in 2009 are drastically different from the current i5-540m's. The 1st generation i7-M processors produced boatloads of heating issues for HP Envy owners and rendered the Envy unable to be placed on the lap or even typed on without significant discomfort. To put things into perspective, the 1st gen HP Envy served a far more useful purpose as a frying pan than as a mobile machine. The even more surprising part is how the 2nd Gen i5-Ms despite their being "mere" i5s ended up outbenching the 1st gen i7s by leaps and bounds while solving most of the heating problems. That really should tell you that there's a lot more to a processor beyond whether it has an "i" and a "5" in the name.

The current generation i5s like all other CPUs in their time won't be "the norm" in 3 years. They'll become obsolete by future generations of processors released. Claiming otherwise would have been not much different from a Pentium I owner claiming, "Pentiums will become the norm at best in 3 years." Great. So they will. But "Pentium" is just a name for a processor line/architecture. After the Pentium I came II..then III...then IV...with each "Pentium" line differing drastically from each other in the clock speeds and technologies introduced.

As much as Intel prefer otherwise, they're still under constant pressure to upgrade their processor lines just about every year. Intel's already in the stages of releasing more details of Sandy Bridge. You can go ahead and and brag later that your i5 is the "norm" 3 years down the road. But 3 years later, your processor, like any processor 3 years before that time, will be "ancient." Before you know it, we'll be using notebooks with processors that don't rely on transistors but simply light transmission.

So you can keep on repeating the same old "far better hardware" talking points. It's as meaningful as claiming that Obama is a Socialist Communist. As long as this "far better hardware" (i.e. A newer CPU) doesn't produce any noticeable improvement in everyday applications, "far better hardware" from a practical standpoint becomes moot. It may be important to photo editors and video makers. But even the staunch gamer won't notice a major difference as devs themselves don't waste their time coding graphics processing functions for CPUs. It's inherently inefficient for CPUs to take over tasks traditionally reserved for GPUs.


P.S. For a performance machine, I see more potential in the HP Envy 14/15 line. At $999, I consider the Envy 14 far better suited for the T410's purpose. It's thin, about the same weight, and it has a real GPU that comes standard instead of a sorry Nvidia secondhand piece of junk for an extra $100. It'll be released soon and should come with the same specs as the Envy 15.

P.P.S. If it is true that 1gb (or even 2gb) is plenty enough for word-processing and internet, then it really makes me wonder again what purpose an i5 would serve beyond artificially jacking up a machine's price tag.

So, my i5 is both far too much processing power and sure to be obsolete within 3 years. How about that. Not really an issue worth debating since MBP uses i5s as well, unless you get the older processors used in 13-inch models. I've read wide praise for the i-line and little criticism. The strength, paid experts say, is in its efficiency and versatility more than max speeds.

Bottom line for me - given the choice, I'll take a faster HDD, faster, newer processor and more durable shell. If it is all a mirage and not worth the price, it is still much less than a MBP.

That said, Lenovo just launched their "green" line and more PCs like the Dell just mentioned will be out soon. I will wait until July 1.

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Duralex
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Re: Best Law School Laptop for the Money

Postby Duralex » Wed May 12, 2010 9:20 am

/shrug

I'm still using LGA775 and the Q9550 for most applications. I don't think a ~3gHz quad core is going to be CPU-limited anytime soon, regardless of its architecture. These days it's video and disk I/O you have to throw money at to guarantee longevity.

barkingbug
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Re: Best Law School Laptop for the Money

Postby barkingbug » Wed May 12, 2010 9:49 am

superflush wrote:
HBK wrote:Let's keep it in the $500-$800 range guys. Thanks!


are you serious?


Thinkpad L412. i3, 320/7200 HDD, 4 RAM. $794.

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zeth006
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Re: Best Law School Laptop for the Money

Postby zeth006 » Wed May 12, 2010 5:00 pm

barkingbug wrote:
zeth006 wrote:
barkingbug wrote:
zeth006 wrote:Meh. The T410 is a heavy brick at 5.58 pounds. 13.13 x 9.41 x 1.09-1.26” dimensions means it's a quarter of an inch thicker than the MBP 13. I don't know about you, but for law school, thick and heavy are just flat out inconvenient and defeat the purpose of getting a notebook for mobility purposes. Plus the MBP 13 gets almost twice the battery life. That means I can just leave the charger at home.

Also it's pointless to rave about an i5 unless you're actually going to use its raw processing power to the fullest. I don't plan to. There are others here who may, in which case the Envy 14 may be preferred.

If I want to game, I have a desktop at home.

Hyperbole much? Do we really think that a pound and a quarter of an inch will make a laptop immobile? BTW, T410 starts at 5.0 pounds. My goal: exercise enough to lose one pound so that I can buy the T410 with dramatically better hardware at a much lower price. I suspect that i5s will be the norm at best in three years.

If weight and word processing are all that matters, there are probably better options than both MBP and Thinkpad.


The term "i5" is just a naming scheme. A moniker (albeit a confusing one) for a processor line. The initial i7s that were dispatched for the first HP Envy back in 2009 are drastically different from the current i5-540m's. The 1st generation i7-M processors produced boatloads of heating issues for HP Envy owners and rendered the Envy unable to be placed on the lap or even typed on without significant discomfort. To put things into perspective, the 1st gen HP Envy served a far more useful purpose as a frying pan than as a mobile machine. The even more surprising part is how the 2nd Gen i5-Ms despite their being "mere" i5s ended up outbenching the 1st gen i7s by leaps and bounds while solving most of the heating problems. That really should tell you that there's a lot more to a processor beyond whether it has an "i" and a "5" in the name.

The current generation i5s like all other CPUs in their time won't be "the norm" in 3 years. They'll become obsolete by future generations of processors released. Claiming otherwise would have been not much different from a Pentium I owner claiming, "Pentiums will become the norm at best in 3 years." Great. So they will. But "Pentium" is just a name for a processor line/architecture. After the Pentium I came II..then III...then IV...with each "Pentium" line differing drastically from each other in the clock speeds and technologies introduced.

As much as Intel prefer otherwise, they're still under constant pressure to upgrade their processor lines just about every year. Intel's already in the stages of releasing more details of Sandy Bridge. You can go ahead and and brag later that your i5 is the "norm" 3 years down the road. But 3 years later, your processor, like any processor 3 years before that time, will be "ancient." Before you know it, we'll be using notebooks with processors that don't rely on transistors but simply light transmission.

So you can keep on repeating the same old "far better hardware" talking points. It's as meaningful as claiming that Obama is a Socialist Communist. As long as this "far better hardware" (i.e. A newer CPU) doesn't produce any noticeable improvement in everyday applications, "far better hardware" from a practical standpoint becomes moot. It may be important to photo editors and video makers. But even the staunch gamer won't notice a major difference as devs themselves don't waste their time coding graphics processing functions for CPUs. It's inherently inefficient for CPUs to take over tasks traditionally reserved for GPUs.


P.S. For a performance machine, I see more potential in the HP Envy 14/15 line. At $999, I consider the Envy 14 far better suited for the T410's purpose. It's thin, about the same weight, and it has a real GPU that comes standard instead of a sorry Nvidia secondhand piece of junk for an extra $100. It'll be released soon and should come with the same specs as the Envy 15.

P.P.S. If it is true that 1gb (or even 2gb) is plenty enough for word-processing and internet, then it really makes me wonder again what purpose an i5 would serve beyond artificially jacking up a machine's price tag.

So, my i5 is both far too much processing power and sure to be obsolete within 3 years. How about that. Not really an issue worth debating since MBP uses i5s as well, unless you get the older processors used in 13-inch models. I've read wide praise for the i-line and little criticism. The strength, paid experts say, is in its efficiency and versatility more than max speeds.

Bottom line for me - given the choice, I'll take a faster HDD, faster, newer processor and more durable shell. If it is all a mirage and not worth the price, it is still much less than a MBP.

That said, Lenovo just launched their "green" line and more PCs like the Dell just mentioned will be out soon. I will wait until July 1.


Well, why not? You yourself "suspected" that the i5 would be the "norm" within 3 years. Well, how about that? You can wax lyrical about how your processor has an "i" and a "5" in it, but as I pointed out earlier, it's pretty meaningless for law school. In case you missed my point, it's that you're putting way too much premium on the processor--for law school applications. It’s going to get old before you know it. As Intel hires more engineers and as AMD gets its bearings back in gear, things are only going to get more intense in the CPU sphere. To be honest, I’m not all that impressed with the i-series processors. The die shrink was nice. 45nm to 32nm is respectable. But I’m waiting to hear about how Sandy Bridge plays out in real life. Combining the CPU and GPU creates more potential for thin and light notebooks.

But unless you plan to do anything CPU-intensive, take the reviews for what they'r worth--but only where it's relevant. They're not made with the average joe in mind. Every generation of CPUs has its own new technologies and gets replaced by the successive generation. The reason I wasn’t really disappointed to hear I was getting a P8600 instead of an i5 is the power draw. I’ll admit that Santa Rosa’s kind of sucked as it led to Macbooks running as hot as a frying pan. Not so with Penryn. I can put it on my lap with no problems. But as with exterior casing, the PC’s differences become apparent. I don’t get any heat on the keyboard as I do with my Asus.

And durable shell. LOL. That's a good one. Check out the Mac vs. Lenovo reviews on youtube. The Lenovo doesn't have as much flex as say, a $400 Dell. But it still has almost the same number of seams, creaks, screws, and thus similar albeit fewer avenues for quality issues. The Macbook Pro uses far fewer screws and it's made out of a single slab of aluminum. Fewer parts means fewer potential quality issues with the exterior construction. Those are the same benefits Boeing reaps with its F-18 Superhornet over the previous hornet; fewer parts means more structural rigidity. I'm not usually one to rag on "fragmented plastic portions" as the PC industry has made most of its notebooks using this method. But I’m making an exception here with my 3rd notebook.

But I will give you the faster HDD though once again--it's each to his own. If you’re going to do some hardcore multitasking or even game, 7200RPM’s almost mandatory. But a 7200RPM HDD would've also increased the noise levels on the MBP 13. Let’s face it. My MBP doesn't use ginormous fans that my Asus uses which means it's relatively silent. Plus for daily use, I don't really consider having 2-4 browser windows with 5 tabs each and Led Zeppelin playing in the background to be "hardcore." Then let’s not forget that the imminent introduction of GPU acceleration into flash apps is only going to subtract whatever extra burden my CPU takes while playing youtube vids ever so smaller.

I dunno about you, but I’m stoked with my 10 hour battery life. I’m able to do work at coffeeshops when I’m sitting far from an outlet and I can leave my power source at home. A 7200RPM speed only cuts into that battery life, and frankly, I don’t notice the difference between 7200RPM HDD on my Asus and the 5400RPM on my Mac. Both have closely similar processors but different HDD speeds. So once again, I agree. The faster HDD has its place. But it’s a bit overrated unless you’re a serious gamer or multitasker. I don’t know how you do things, but frankly, a SSD upgrade is more noteworthy in my book.

Finally, I get all the benefits of OSX and Windows on one machine with none of the downsides of Windows. I can run Boot Camp, VMWare, and Crossover for any Windows app anytime I wish. OneNote runs as snappily on my Macbook Pro via Crossover as it does on my Asus. I don’t have a registry on OSX to deal with so I don’t have to worry about extra clutter building up over. Thus reformats/reinstallations just to get rid of lingering junk become unnecessary. OSX itself compensates for whatever “hardware deficiencies" that accompany Macbooks. There's a good reason Mac owners speak of how work on OSX is done as smoothly as syrup. Low specs or not, the memory management is excellent and the OS is actually optimized for a couple of notebook/iMac lines and not for thousands of different PCs. For some strange reason, these Mac owners’ $1,000+ desktops with technology that's 2 generations newer doesn't seem to run as smoothly. You can probably chalk up roughly 50% of the user-friendly to the fact that Apple actually goes through the trouble to write their own drivers instead of relying on some 3rd party company that ends support months after the Macbook first leaves the shelves. I would say the other half is the OS’s numerous tweaks, enhancements, and refinements over the years. After I tweaked with my voltage settings, I haven’t gotten one crash. Not needing to run an anti-virus simply means I get more freed up RAM to use.


So in essence, you can brag to me that your Ford Mustang has a higher horsepower engine or even slightly higher fuel efficiency. Whoopdedoo! If it doesn’t do well on indexes such as torsional rigidity, steering precision, ride comfort, and legroom, I’m not buying it. We all know that horsepower isn't the only coefficient for all of these indexes and it won't deliver the same engaging ride experience that a G37 or a Hyundai Genesis Coupe delivers.

The same goes with notebooks. I'm not going to worry about specs if they're only peripherally relevant to the user experience. CPUs these days are so powerful that they've turned the GPU into bottlenecks for many intensive applications. The trickle down effects of higher end parts has accelerated to the point where we get all these powerful CPUs tossed at us that don't really make as much of a difference from the previous generations as they used to with the Pentium lines of the 1990s. Now, there’s more to notebooks than just interior hardware parts. If the notebook’s touchpad sucks monkey balls (a la HP DM3t), has an extremely washy screen, has flex and tons of avenues for broken parts (90%+ of all PCs), or is thick and heavy, then I can’t buy it. The MBP combines multiple strengths into one package as I stated in my review some posts back and it doesn’t rely on specs to do what it does.
Last edited by zeth006 on Wed May 12, 2010 6:08 pm, edited 1 time in total.

wired
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Re: Best Law School Laptop for the Money

Postby wired » Wed May 12, 2010 6:01 pm

Image

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kalvano
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Re: Best Law School Laptop for the Money

Postby kalvano » Wed May 12, 2010 6:04 pm

My Mustang can run over your notebook, thus rendering your Core i5 useless.

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Matthies
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Re: Best Law School Laptop for the Money

Postby Matthies » Wed May 12, 2010 6:37 pm

In three years we will have nitorgen cooled laptops running 10 core processors on 2TB SSDs for about 2k. My prediction

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Jay-Electronica
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Re: Best Law School Laptop for the Money

Postby Jay-Electronica » Wed May 12, 2010 6:42 pm

Just upgraded my mac to 320 GB HDD and 3 GB of Ram with a 500 GB EHDD and 2x120 GB portable EHDDs


I previously had 120 GBHDD and 1GB of Ram.

Works a lot smoother and quicker. Now time to install windows. Is vista ultimate edition ok? Are there any alternatives to onenote? If you dont use onenote are you doomed?

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Matthies
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Re: Best Law School Laptop for the Money

Postby Matthies » Wed May 12, 2010 6:49 pm

Jay-Electronica wrote:Just upgraded my mac to 320 GB HDD and 3 GB of Ram with a 500 GB EHDD and 2x120 GB portable EHDDs


I previously had 120 GBHDD and 1GB of Ram.

Works a lot smoother and quicker. Now time to install windows. Is vista ultimate edition ok? Are there any alternatives to onenote? If you dont use onenote are you doomed?


You could try messing around with Evernote or Springnote both are free to try and use and are web 2.0 platformsso will work across OSs (but cost $ if you want more than the free amount of space), you don't NEED OnenOte, buts a hella of a orginizing program, I run my life on OneNote and Outlook which integrate with each other.

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zeth006
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Re: Best Law School Laptop for the Money

Postby zeth006 » Wed May 12, 2010 6:49 pm

Jay-Electronica wrote:Just upgraded my mac to 320 GB HDD and 3 GB of Ram with a 500 GB EHDD and 2x120 GB portable EHDDs


I previously had 120 GBHDD and 1GB of Ram.

Works a lot smoother and quicker. Now time to install windows. Is vista ultimate edition ok? Are there any alternatives to onenote? If you dont use onenote are you doomed?


There are plenty of alternatives, but nothing beats OneNote. Just pirate CrossOver 9.0 from piratebay, crack it, then install Office '07. Installation of Office '07 will stall for it, so you just need to let it sit there and let Crossover do its thing.

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Matthies
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Re: Best Law School Laptop for the Money

Postby Matthies » Wed May 12, 2010 6:50 pm

Jay-Electronica wrote:Just upgraded my mac to 320 GB HDD and 3 GB of Ram with a 500 GB EHDD and 2x120 GB portable EHDDs


I previously had 120 GBHDD and 1GB of Ram.

Works a lot smoother and quicker. Now time to install windows. Is vista ultimate edition ok? Are there any alternatives to onenote? If you dont use onenote are you doomed?


What are you doing with your old 120 HDD, through it in an external case and make a portable EHDD out of it

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Matthies
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Re: Best Law School Laptop for the Money

Postby Matthies » Wed May 12, 2010 6:52 pm

zeth006 wrote:
Jay-Electronica wrote:Just upgraded my mac to 320 GB HDD and 3 GB of Ram with a 500 GB EHDD and 2x120 GB portable EHDDs


I previously had 120 GBHDD and 1GB of Ram.

Works a lot smoother and quicker. Now time to install windows. Is vista ultimate edition ok? Are there any alternatives to onenote? If you dont use onenote are you doomed?


There are plenty of alternatives, but nothing beats OneNote. Just pirate CrossOver 9.0 from piratebay, crack it, then install Office '07. Installation of Office '07 will stall for it, so you just need to let it sit there and let Crossover do its thing.


Umm its a LAW SCHOOL froum you know. I don't condone stealing softwarze or movies, or music, but if you do, use a good IP block plus proxy sever x 2 and don't ever, ever do it on your LS network. :)

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zeth006
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Re: Best Law School Laptop for the Money

Postby zeth006 » Wed May 12, 2010 7:06 pm

Matthies wrote:
zeth006 wrote:
Jay-Electronica wrote:Just upgraded my mac to 320 GB HDD and 3 GB of Ram with a 500 GB EHDD and 2x120 GB portable EHDDs


I previously had 120 GBHDD and 1GB of Ram.

Works a lot smoother and quicker. Now time to install windows. Is vista ultimate edition ok? Are there any alternatives to onenote? If you dont use onenote are you doomed?


There are plenty of alternatives, but nothing beats OneNote. Just pirate CrossOver 9.0 from piratebay, crack it, then install Office '07. Installation of Office '07 will stall for it, so you just need to let it sit there and let Crossover do its thing.


Umm its a LAW SCHOOL froum you know. I don't condone stealing softwarze or movies, or music, but if you do, use a good IP block plus proxy sever x 2 and don't ever, ever do it on your LS network. :)



Do you know of any free IP blockers and proxy servers I can use?

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Matthies
Posts: 1253
Joined: Fri Aug 14, 2009 6:18 pm

Re: Best Law School Laptop for the Money

Postby Matthies » Wed May 12, 2010 7:11 pm

zeth006 wrote:
Matthies wrote:
zeth006 wrote:
Jay-Electronica wrote:Just upgraded my mac to 320 GB HDD and 3 GB of Ram with a 500 GB EHDD and 2x120 GB portable EHDDs


I previously had 120 GBHDD and 1GB of Ram.

Works a lot smoother and quicker. Now time to install windows. Is vista ultimate edition ok? Are there any alternatives to onenote? If you dont use onenote are you doomed?


There are plenty of alternatives, but nothing beats OneNote. Just pirate CrossOver 9.0 from piratebay, crack it, then install Office '07. Installation of Office '07 will stall for it, so you just need to let it sit there and let Crossover do its thing.


Umm its a LAW SCHOOL froum you know. I don't condone stealing softwarze or movies, or music, but if you do, use a good IP block plus proxy sever x 2 and don't ever, ever do it on your LS network. :)



Do you know of any free IP blockers and proxy servers I can use?


Peerblock and Foxy proxy are decent so I've heard... proxy severs are hit and miss, becuase well, they don't stay up that long. FWI with Peerblock running you won't be bale to get to most sites, so turn it on when you need it, like um, when bit torrent something




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