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actuallybasically
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Postby actuallybasically » Mon Feb 22, 2010 9:22 pm

I deleted the content of this post. The overwhelming reaction to it was simply ridiculous and not what I was intending.
Last edited by actuallybasically on Tue Feb 23, 2010 1:05 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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scribelaw
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Re: The importance of having a unique, strong reason to get a JD

Postby scribelaw » Mon Feb 22, 2010 9:25 pm

Is this a joke or a flame?

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Sauer Grapes
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Re: The importance of having a unique, strong reason to get a JD

Postby Sauer Grapes » Mon Feb 22, 2010 9:25 pm

....
Last edited by Sauer Grapes on Sun Aug 22, 2010 8:40 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: The importance of having a unique, strong reason to get a JD

Postby BenJ » Mon Feb 22, 2010 9:32 pm

I don't think it's a flame, but who knows.

Anyway, I'm sorry, but it's all a numbers game. Being intersex may well help, but not with a mid-150s LSAT and without a GPA (normally, you'd be assessed as if you had the school's median GPA, but with a poor LSAT score you won't be). I don't know what schools have JD/MA or JD/LLM programs in international relations/law, but international law is literally the hardest law profession to have any success in, and no one from a school short of Harvard or Yale ever gets a job in it. (Schools offering focuses in international law short of Harvard and Yale are swindling you.)

But good luck, I guess. You do have a good story.

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Cavalier
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Re: The importance of having a unique, strong reason to get a JD

Postby Cavalier » Mon Feb 22, 2010 9:39 pm

Law school is not for you.

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Re: The importance of having a unique, strong reason to get a JD

Postby 270910 » Mon Feb 22, 2010 9:40 pm

tl;dr

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BaiAilian2013
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Re: The importance of having a unique, strong reason to get a JD

Postby BaiAilian2013 » Mon Feb 22, 2010 9:44 pm

actuallybasically wrote:This isn't even mentioning the sometimes-obscure material we studied, which we examined from an interdisciplinary viewpoint.
Wow. Rigorous. Oberlin?

actuallybasically wrote:Maybe those 180 LSAT photographic-memory process-regurgitating NERDS will be the undoing of me. I don't know. But I do know that almost none of them could be as good an attorney as I can be.
Burn. Shame on them for their patriarchal, oppressive, more-useful-than-yours cognitive strengths.

I try really hard not to be a jerk on TLS, so forgive me my weakness just this once.

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Re: The importance of having a unique, strong reason to get a JD

Postby ccs224 » Mon Feb 22, 2010 10:09 pm

actuallybasically wrote:Maybe all of this is for naught. Maybe I won't get in, maybe all the hundreds of thousands of middle- and upper-class 'straight' white kids with well-bolstered backgrounds will take the spots I might have otherwise gotten at a law school. Maybe those 180 LSAT photographic-memory process-regurgitating NERDS will be the undoing of me. I don't know. But I do know that almost none of them could be as good an attorney as I can be.


Too defensive; doesn't play well with a general audience. I would suggest cutting this from your PS.

At best, you'll have a unique PS which could help you out, but I wouldn't count on it too much at schools that are above your LSAT range. Before this cycle, I was pretty sure that my personal statement and "softs" would prove that I would not only be a great law student, but also be truly committed to a PI career. I bet my story made an adcomm or two smile, but faced with a 20 year old undergrad with little work or life experience but two more LSAT points, they'll probably go for the kid. Can't say I blame them; they're under the same pressure to go for numbers that we are.

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Re: The importance of having a unique, strong reason to get a JD

Postby 270910 » Mon Feb 22, 2010 10:14 pm

From another thread:

actuallybasically wrote:Rad Law... I really disagree with your negativity in this post. Did you know that Stetson is NUMBER ONE for litigation?

Look-- making a career for yourself with a law degree is UP TO YOU. It is not about regionality of a school or whatever. What I really cannot stand about so many people on these law school sites are how darn negative some of you can be. So condescending and just NEG-A-TIVE! If you can't go out and get in the kind of career you want to, on your OWN, without your school's connections, you are in trouble as a professional anyhow.

Stop being a Negative Nancy. Srsly!


What we have here is a grad-A troll...

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Re: The importance of having a unique, strong reason to get a JD

Postby manbearwig » Mon Feb 22, 2010 10:18 pm

disco_barred wrote:From another thread:

actuallybasically wrote:Rad Law... I really disagree with your negativity in this post. Did you know that Stetson is NUMBER ONE for litigation?

Look-- making a career for yourself with a law degree is UP TO YOU. It is not about regionality of a school or whatever. What I really cannot stand about so many people on these law school sites are how darn negative some of you can be. So condescending and just NEG-A-TIVE! If you can't go out and get in the kind of career you want to, on your OWN, without your school's connections, you are in trouble as a professional anyhow.

Stop being a Negative Nancy. Srsly!


What we have here is a grad-A troll...


I really don't think she's a troll. Just someone who's oblivious about law school and the application process.

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Re: The importance of having a unique, strong reason to get a JD

Postby BaiAilian2013 » Mon Feb 22, 2010 10:25 pm

manbearwig wrote:
disco_barred wrote:From another thread:

actuallybasically wrote:Rad Law... I really disagree with your negativity in this post. Did you know that Stetson is NUMBER ONE for litigation?

Look-- making a career for yourself with a law degree is UP TO YOU. It is not about regionality of a school or whatever. What I really cannot stand about so many people on these law school sites are how darn negative some of you can be. So condescending and just NEG-A-TIVE! If you can't go out and get in the kind of career you want to, on your OWN, without your school's connections, you are in trouble as a professional anyhow.

Stop being a Negative Nancy. Srsly!


What we have here is a grad-A troll...


I really don't think she's a troll. Just someone who's oblivious about law school and the application process.

I'm also pretty positive she's not a troll, because I know way too many people exactly like this.

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Re: The importance of having a unique, strong reason to get a JD

Postby tomhobbes » Mon Feb 22, 2010 10:34 pm

actuallybasically wrote:Maybe I am just being a bit Pollyanna about all of this, but, it seems to me if I have a unique story and very strong case made in my personal statement, along with an undergraduate education specifically geared towards government, law, and policymaking, I have a really decent shot of getting into law school.

I just took my first (and only, hopefully) LSAT this February. Actually it was this past weekend. I think I got somewhere in the 150s range. I knew this test was not a strength of mine, and I stated in my applications before even taking the test that I went to an undergraduate institution which doesn't use ABCDF grades and standardized testing as a means of evaluation. Instead we have a system of self- and faculty evaluations of our performance. Then the professors decide how much credit we will receive for the work we did in a given quarter. My point is, testing under tightly-timed conditions is by no means my forte but to make up for that I am quite strong in my writing, communication, and also critical thinking skills BECAUSE I went to a school which focused on developing those attributes within its students. This isn't even mentioning the sometimes-obscure material we studied, which we examined from an interdisciplinary viewpoint. I am so happy I had a nonconventional education because I feel I know a whole lot about the world we live and and how it became the way it is that I might never would have otherwise known if I went to another school. I never had a professor who didn't know my name and personality, and I never had a classtime lecture with 100+ people. Thankfully.

Aside from my undergraduate education, I'm unique in the fact that I am part of a distinctly oppressed group in society. I made specific mention in my personal statements of how that affected my life and what I had done to resist the tides against me. Additionally I made the case of how I would be a groundbreaking pioneer if I was to attain a JD and actually do the type of work I wish to do with that degree. Actually all of the schools I have applied to (and I applied to 6-- again, am I being a Pollyanna?) have a JD-MA or LLM program in International Affairs or International Law so I specifically stated that I was applying to get two degrees. In other words, I wasn't just applying based on rankings, but was applying because of what the school OFFERED. I don't have the exact luxury of applying to 10-11-12-13-14 schools, because there just are not 14 schools that have a dual-degree program like I really want. Jeesh, I can't imagine how expensive that would be to apply to all of those schools! Before I decided to go to law school I was just going to apply for a Master's in International Affairs, but something clicked in me last Autumn and that all changed.

Maybe all of this is for naught. Maybe I won't get in, maybe all the hundreds of thousands of middle- and upper-class 'straight' white kids with well-bolstered backgrounds will take the spots I might have otherwise gotten at a law school. Maybe those 180 LSAT photographic-memory process-regurgitating NERDS will be the undoing of me. I don't know. But I do know that almost none of them could be as good an attorney as I can be.

...And then again, maybe all of you should be so fortunate as me to be an intersex, transgender-identified female (FOR ONCE it could help and not hurt me- hysterical). Going back to earlier in this post when I wrote about not being tested-- well, that is to say the least! I never took the SAT or ACT and I dropped out of high school in the 9th grade, despite being near the top of my class, because I couldn't take being harassed and beaten and called "[HI I'M THE WORD FILTER. THIS PERSON MIGHT BE A DICK.]" Monday through Friday anymore. That's right, folks-- I am a high school DROP-OUT who eventually got a GED at 18 years of age and then made it to the doorstep of law school. My unique circumstances and experience, laid out in the context of what I consider to be the all-important Personal Statement just might be the edge in getting me to the point of becoming the shark litigator that I know I can be :::rrraawwrrrr:::

Maybe, just maybe, 'trans' or 'high school dropout' are the magic keywords to law school. Try it and see?

((The point of this comical but narrative piece, in case you missed it, is to emphasize the importance of bringing out those things in your personal background which unmistakably set you apart in your Statements, during the application process))



((The point of this comical but narrative piece, in case you missed it, is to emphasize the importance of bringing out those things in your personal background which unmistakably set you apart in your Statements, during the application process))


You would make this point much more convincingly if you made this post after having much greater success than your numbers would predict. Right now, this just sounds like wishful thinking. I'm genuinely sorry that you've had a hard life. I'm sure law schools will be genuinely sorry that you've had a hard life. But I don't think it will help you nearly as much as you seem to expect.

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Re: The importance of having a unique, strong reason to get a JD

Postby Tofu » Mon Feb 22, 2010 10:40 pm

BaiAilian2013 wrote:
actuallybasically wrote:Maybe those 180 LSAT photographic-memory process-regurgitating NERDS will be the undoing of me. I don't know. But I do know that almost none of them could be as good an attorney as I can be.
Burn. Shame on them for their patriarchal, oppressive, more-useful-than-yours cognitive strengths.

I try really hard not to be a jerk on TLS, so forgive me my weakness just this once.


i certainly wouldn't mind being (or being called) a photographic-memory process-regurgitating NERD!

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Re: The importance of having a unique, strong reason to get a JD

Postby vanwinkle » Mon Feb 22, 2010 10:46 pm

betasteve wrote:Is this your manifesto?

Needs more righteous anger and blaming The Man.

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Re: The importance of having a unique, strong reason to get a JD

Postby manbearwig » Mon Feb 22, 2010 10:46 pm

Tofu wrote:
BaiAilian2013 wrote:
actuallybasically wrote:Maybe those 180 LSAT photographic-memory process-regurgitating NERDS will be the undoing of me. I don't know. But I do know that almost none of them could be as good an attorney as I can be.
Burn. Shame on them for their patriarchal, oppressive, more-useful-than-yours cognitive strengths.

I try really hard not to be a jerk on TLS, so forgive me my weakness just this once.


i certainly wouldn't mind being (or being called) a photographic-memory process-regurgitating NERD!


Lol, really. And I'm sure many people on this forum also wouldn't mind. (And almost everyone here deserves the title of nerd.)

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Re: The importance of having a unique, strong reason to get a JD

Postby Mr. Pablo » Mon Feb 22, 2010 10:47 pm

OP, it sounds like you have had a challenging life thus far, and it seems like you have tremendous ability to overcome challenges. Schools like that, and they actively seek it in applicants who are very close to their numerical standards. It is a bitter pill to swallow that, largely, you are going to be reduced to numbers, but that is how the vast majority of schools do it. I don't like it any more than you, but that is the reality of it.

Also, I got called [HI I'M THE WORD FILTER. THIS PERSON MIGHT BE A DICK.] (I am) in HS as well. I didn't drop out though. I spent most of my teens and college years going to third world countries building schools and helping to establish sustainable agricultural economies. I went to art school and didn't have any grades (school didn't calculate GPA). I graduated, had some success as an artist (shows, awards, yada yada yada) and I had my own business for several years.
I took 3 community college classes in HS. I didn't care and got 2Cs and 1 B- GPA was 2.22. LSAC has my cum. GPA at 2.22 (no UG GPA).
I got a 170 on my LSAT. go to Law School Predictor and put those numbers in and my cycle is not that far off from that (a bit better, but not by much). This is why I am sure that schools do not care that much beyond numbers. So I am going to make the best of it, but whining about it does you no good.

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Re: The importance of having a unique, strong reason to get a JD

Postby Borhas » Mon Feb 22, 2010 10:58 pm

If I were you I'd play up the transgendered aspect of your life, etc not just how you were oppressed, but how you overcame it and became a better person because of it, but you are going to do that anyway I hope. Just realize that a unique life isn't enough, you also need to write creatively, and succinctly. But even if you do that, your PS probably won't help THAT much.

Practice more for LSAT. LS admissions is a numbers game, it's not just, it's not fair, it doesn't measure your intelligence, it just is. So what if the LSAT is not what you are good at? Think of it as another obstacle to overcome.

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Re: The importance of having a unique, strong reason to get a JD

Postby Grizz » Mon Feb 22, 2010 11:18 pm

disco_barred wrote:From another thread:

actuallybasically wrote:Rad Law... I really disagree with your negativity in this post. Did you know that Stetson is NUMBER ONE for litigation?

Look-- making a career for yourself with a law degree is UP TO YOU. It is not about regionality of a school or whatever. What I really cannot stand about so many people on these law school sites are how darn negative some of you can be. So condescending and just NEG-A-TIVE! If you can't go out and get in the kind of career you want to, on your OWN, without your school's connections, you are in trouble as a professional anyhow.

Stop being a Negative Nancy. Srsly!


What we have here is a grad-A troll...


Not a troll, just someone who doesn't know what's going on so much.

My unique circumstances and experience, laid out in the context of what I consider to be the all-important Personal Statement just might be the edge in getting me to the point of becoming the shark litigator that I know I can be :::rrraawwrrrr:::


My dad was a high school dropout, and he also went to a school that didn't have grades. He went to BC and is very successful now. However, he had a nice LSAT score, and that was a different time when the competition wasn't as intense. Unfortunately, the PS is interesting, but is probably not gonna make your cycle. Best of luck to you I guess.

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Re: The importance of having a unique, strong reason to get a JD

Postby actuallybasically » Mon Feb 22, 2010 11:27 pm

Everyone- this is NOT a personal statement I submitted to any law school. I wrote this today.

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Re: The importance of having a unique, strong reason to get a JD

Postby jdhopeful11 » Mon Feb 22, 2010 11:28 pm

transgender<woman<man

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Re: The importance of having a unique, strong reason to get a JD

Postby Grizz » Mon Feb 22, 2010 11:32 pm

actuallybasically wrote:Everyone- this is NOT a personal statement I submitted to any law school. I wrote this today.


We are assuming that some of the ideas you touched on will be included in your PS. The point still stands that law school admissions is basically a numbers game and that life experience, while it may make you a better lawyer, will probably not give you a huge leg up for law admissions.

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Re: The importance of having a unique, strong reason to get a JD

Postby scribelaw » Mon Feb 22, 2010 11:34 pm

Borhas wrote:If I were you I'd play up the transgendered aspect of your life, etc not just how you were oppressed, but how you overcame it and became a better person because of it, but you are going to do that anyway I hope. Just realize that a unique life isn't enough, you also need to write creatively, and succinctly. But even if you do that, your PS probably won't help THAT much.

Practice more for LSAT. LS admissions is a numbers game, it's not just, it's not fair, it doesn't measure your intelligence, it just is. So what if the LSAT is not what you are good at? Think of it as another obstacle to overcome.


If the LSAT is one thing, it's fair. It's a straightforward standardized test that anyone with the basic skills to be a decent law student can prepare for and get good at. There are no tricks. What wouldn't be fair is if law schools admitted people on whim, or tried to peer into the souls of people like the OP and divine that they are special snowflakes who would be better lawyers than people who actually studied for and performed well on the LSAT.

Also, these people who complain that the LSAT isn't a good judge because they don't do well under pressurized testing conditions -- what do you think law school is? And then BigLaw after that?

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Re: The importance of having a unique, strong reason to get a JD

Postby englawyer » Mon Feb 22, 2010 11:41 pm

scribelaw wrote:
Borhas wrote:If I were you I'd play up the transgendered aspect of your life, etc not just how you were oppressed, but how you overcame it and became a better person because of it, but you are going to do that anyway I hope. Just realize that a unique life isn't enough, you also need to write creatively, and succinctly. But even if you do that, your PS probably won't help THAT much.

Practice more for LSAT. LS admissions is a numbers game, it's not just, it's not fair, it doesn't measure your intelligence, it just is. So what if the LSAT is not what you are good at? Think of it as another obstacle to overcome.


If the LSAT is one thing, it's fair. It's a straightforward standardized test that anyone with the basic skills to be a decent law student can prepare for and get good at. There are no tricks. What wouldn't be fair is if law schools admitted people on whim, or tried to peer into the souls of people like the OP and divine that they are special snowflakes who would be better lawyers than people who actually studied for and performed well on the LSAT.

Also, these people who complain that the LSAT isn't a good judge because they don't do well under pressurized testing conditions -- what do you think law school is? And then BigLaw after that?


+1

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Re: The importance of having a unique, strong reason to get a JD

Postby Mr. Pablo » Mon Feb 22, 2010 11:44 pm

actuallybasically wrote:Everyone- this is NOT a personal statement I submitted to any law school. I wrote this today.

None of the responses would, to me at least, indicate that anyone thinks that your posting is a PS.
rad law wrote:
actuallybasically wrote:Everyone- this is NOT a personal statement I submitted to any law school. I wrote this today.


We are assuming that some of the ideas you touched on will be included in your PS. The point still stands that law school admissions is basically a numbers game and that life experience, while it may make you a better lawyer, will probably not give you a huge leg up for law admissions.


And that is just about it.

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Re: The importance of having a unique, strong reason to get a JD

Postby EdmundBurke23 » Mon Feb 22, 2010 11:47 pm

I think you're a little too self-confident. You come off as very arrogant. You seem to reject the realities of this world that we live in. You'v simply come up with a bunch of bogus reasons to help you feel better about your post-secondary institution that nobody'll ever care about. The truh is that most people will perceive it as dank. It's worthless to the world. And the world is where you live.

You've never competed with anyone after dropping out of 9th grade. How do you think law school's going to treat you? In other words, if you've never been in a clear-cut competition before, how in the heck are you able to state in bold terms that you're better than others?




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