Law School Admissions Lag Among Minorities

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Drake014
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Re: Law School Admissions Lag Among Minorities

Postby Drake014 » Sat Jan 09, 2010 8:25 pm

Its quite possible that URMs are more apt to look at a law degree as an investment than their non URM counterparts. As such, they may be applying to more reach schools, refusing to settle for lesser schools given the cost of law school and the dwindling prospects for employment.

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IAFG
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Re: Law School Admissions Lag Among Minorities

Postby IAFG » Sat Jan 09, 2010 8:30 pm

Drake014 wrote:Its quite possible that URMs are more apt to look at a law degree as an investment than their non URM counterparts. As such, they may be applying to more reach schools, refusing to settle for lesser schools given the cost of law school and the dwindling prospects for employment.

why on earth would that be the case ?!

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Re: Law School Admissions Lag Among Minorities

Postby FuturehoyaLawya » Sat Jan 09, 2010 8:31 pm

talibkweli wrote:look i am a black male from an inner city with a 174 and no t14 acceptances yet, so i'm in no mood to be sympathetic towards people who rail against the supposed urm bump. every time i look at lsn there is another white or asian person with WORSE numbers than me just pwning the shit out of my cycle. this is michigan vs appalachian state--i went in heavily favored only to be humiliated at the end.

i really am not feeling intellectually curious enough to debate big picture stuff right now, but hey just to put it out there, the article sucks b/c it doesnt address the possibility that white and asians have had faster increases in scores.

your cycle is not over just yet, you just got the 174 in dec......so you shouldn't be panicking in jan, but you also have to keep in your mind your GPA is on the low side, and GPA often matters a lot for URMs (including undergrad and a flawless application/recs despite what some may say). most likely you'll get nto harvard and/or columbia and look back at some of your posts and laugh :)

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You Gotta Have Faith
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Re: Law School Admissions Lag Among Minorities

Postby You Gotta Have Faith » Sat Jan 09, 2010 8:33 pm

Drake014 wrote:Its quite possible that URMs are more apt to look at a law degree as an investment than their non URM counterparts. As such, they may be applying to more reach schools, refusing to settle for lesser schools given the cost of law school and the dwindling prospects for employment.


That could be true of some URMs. But I don't think it can be over-generalized, as it applies to a few people. I'm not a URM and this statement is certainly true of my last year cycle (half reaches), although I would have been willing to go to a slightly "lesser" school if the reaches hadn't worked out.

FuturehoyaLawya
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Re: Law School Admissions Lag Among Minorities

Postby FuturehoyaLawya » Sat Jan 09, 2010 8:46 pm

tjwil326 wrote:Not sure if this was said in different words already, but I think URM applicants can overestimate the boost they get from their URM status. Not saying the boost is insignificant, it surely is very significant. However if a URM applicant has a 150 with a 3.3, the applicant may still shoot for the t14 because they know anything is possible with the URM status; at the same time the applicant may neglect to apply to lower ranked schools because he/she thinks one of the higher ranked schools will bite. I'm not sure how many URM applicants have done this, but I admit I have. I am Mex URM, and last cycle I applied on Jan 31st to 9 of the t14(just like was said earlier - URMs might not put enough effort into apps). Stats 161, 3.53(3.68) from UC Berk. I was bummed about my LSAT score so I really didn't want to apply until I retook; towards the end of January I decided what's the worst that could happen so I threw some apps out there. I was put in the reserve pile at Columbia and Cornell, denied at all other schools. This cycle I applied much earlier, and applied to schools that would accept my numbers without my URM status as well as some in the t14.


i am surprised by this but probably due to the fact you applied late in the cycle, i do think admission has gotten harder compared to a few years ago. 162 and 3.5 URM would have been accepted to t-14 years ago, but these days with more prep.....increase in LSAT averages across the board, URMs who have these credentials are still applying only to T-14 are now being shut out......which could further signal the quality of applications and numbers for URM are only getting better, except now the URMs with the 162s and 3.5s are now negatively impacted.

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billyez
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Re: Law School Admissions Lag Among Minorities

Postby billyez » Sat Jan 09, 2010 9:22 pm

rookhawk wrote:While I don't have data at the ready to support this, I think its a probable conclusion:


As a collective group, minorities think differently than the majority. When you're a first or second generation college graduate you have something to prove, an inheritance to earn yourself, and a burgeoning desire to move up a few pegs in social class. Bottom line - many minorities throw their hat in the ring for law school half-heartedly, they have a plan to build a business or leverage other dreams but they figure "heck, if I can get an inexpensive law degree that'd be swell". Naturally, if you are even mildly apathetic about your law school dreams the admissions teams can smell it a mile away.

Regardless of color, I always enjoy watching underdog first-generation college grads enthusiasm and desire to grow. So many entrepreneurs have been minted through this insatiable desire to ascend the lower/lower-middle class. (as was my experience)

-Rookhawk


I'm not seeing this and I think it's really odd that people see minorities as thinking differently as a "collective group". Law school is an individual experience whether your in the majority or minority. Beyond that, I disagree entirely with your assertion because it's a gross generalization. I will agree that first-generation college graduates do feel that pressure to move up in the world...our parents make that expressly clear.

I'm seeing a lot of people making generalizations about the way URM's approach the application process; they must apply to only the top schools, they must do it half-heartedly, etc. How about we just stick to the study itself rather than making assumptions?

Speaking of the study, I'm rather shocked by the low GPA of African Americans. According to that study I'm an outlier in terms of GPA - especially if my graduating instituion GPA is observed. I'm also surprised by the super-low rate of applications made by Mexican-Americans especially when compared to the number of AA applications.

The point of the matter is 64 percent of AA's and 46 percent of Mexican-Americans who applied to law school from 2003 to 2008 were denied admission to every single law schoolt hat they applied to. You can say what you want, but you can't make me believe that of those 64 percent more than half of them only applied to the top ranked schools. I admit, the argument of the study would be a heck of a lot more palatable and stronger if it compiled data of the schools that these folks applied too, but these applicants weren't any different from us. When I got rejected from UT and Georgetown I widened my net and applied to lower ranked schools. You folks probably did the same if you were rejected from higher schools. It's common sense. I don't see why you can make the assumption that 64 percent of AA law applicants and 46 percent of Mexican-American applicants applied to the Top 20, got rejected from all of them and didn't apply to any other schools.

And I understand the irrational Cooley hate here on TLS, but the study was done by someone from Columbia law, what the Cooley person said has nothing to do with the study itself.

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billyez
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Re: Law School Admissions Lag Among Minorities

Postby billyez » Sat Jan 09, 2010 9:33 pm

ruleser wrote:This is the meat of the article, and the flaw:
"What makes the declines particularly troubling, said the professor, Conrad Johnson, is that in that same period, both groups improved their college grade-point averages and their scores on the Law School Admission Test, or L.S.A.T.

“Even though their scores and grades are improving, and are very close to those of white applicants, African-Americans and Mexican-Americans are increasingly being shut out of law schools,” said Mr. Johnson, who oversees the Lawyering in the Digital Age Clinic at Columbia, which collaborated with the Society of American Law Teachers to examine minority enrollment rates at American law schools."

Yes, their scores are improving, but from what, 2.2 to 2.9? While something like that would be a great increase, and bring them fairly close to white applicants, there's just a huge difference between 2.9 and 3.2 even for LS. And there's a huge difference between 155 and 160. Without hard numbers, this article is meaningless.

This being the issue is sort of implied later when the article says:
“A big part of it is that many schools base their admissions criteria not on whether students have a reasonable chance of success, but how those L.S.A.T. numbers are going to affect their rankings in the U.S. News & World Report,” Mr. Nussbaumer said. “Deans get fired if the rankings drop, so they set their L.S.A.T. requirements very high."

So what's happening is yes, the numbers among these groups are improving, but still are not good enough to get into law schools. A few get in by URM AA, but the schools can't wholesale allow large numbers of people with subpar numbers. In the meantime, more crazy white folk are willing to plop down $150K to attend T4.

Also, we don't know what schools the minorities studied applied to - did they try only T1 mainly, T30, thinking their URM would get them in and so get shut out?

In short, without a single specific included in the article about what their numbers are or where they apply, this article is just doody.


The study is linked. The numbers are clearly noted in there. It supports your assertion of the increase of GPA being relative - I think it was 2.70 to 2.96 for AA. It still doesn't change the overwhelming number of law school applicants that are minorities that aren't accepted.

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BasketCaseBrief
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Re: Law School Admissions Lag Among Minorities

Postby BasketCaseBrief » Sat Jan 09, 2010 10:16 pm

I think the problem is the increasing cost of graduate education during the period in question. Less and less people in general are able to afford it after accumulating debt from their undergrad education; and this hits minorities the hardest, particularly those in the lower economic class, so they're less likely to take the financial risk, in my opinion.

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je_ne_regrette_rien
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Re: Law School Admissions Lag Among Minorities

Postby je_ne_regrette_rien » Sat Jan 09, 2010 10:45 pm

BasketCaseBrief wrote:I think the problem is the increasing cost of graduate education during the period in question. Less and less people in general are able to afford it after accumulating debt from their undergrad education; and this hits minorities the hardest, particularly those in the lower economic class, so they're less likely to take the financial risk, in my opinion.


+1

That could explain why AA's do not apply. Doesn't explain why more than 60% didn't get into a single law school.

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newyorker88
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Re: Law School Admissions Lag Among Minorities

Postby newyorker88 » Sat Jan 09, 2010 10:57 pm

BasketCaseBrief wrote:I think the problem is the increasing cost of graduate education during the period in question. Less and less people in general are able to afford it after accumulating debt from their undergrad education; and this hits minorities the hardest, particularly those in the lower economic class, so they're less likely to take the financial risk, in my opinion.


??? What you're saying doesn't address the study at all which found that those that applied are being rejected at very high numbers. The study never said less blacks and mexicans are applying.

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je_ne_regrette_rien
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Re: Law School Admissions Lag Among Minorities

Postby je_ne_regrette_rien » Sat Jan 09, 2010 11:07 pm

Can TLS members please learn the difference between LESS and FEWER? Please??? :? :cry: :P

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Re: Law School Admissions Lag Among Minorities

Postby APimpNamedSlickback » Sat Jan 09, 2010 11:13 pm

ok: the study uses an absolute increase in urm gpa and lsat figures to suggest that the widening gap between urm and non-urm law school attendance is unwarranted. however, to make that argument, the study really needed to show whether urm applicants are making up ground RELATIVE to non-urms, not just an upward secular trend. that is my major issue with the article.

unfortunately, a large number of urms score below the minimum lsat score required for aba accrediation. moreover, as others indicated, the lack of proper advice and guidance probably leads to sub-optimal choices in schools to submit applications.

i think this is a very real problem, and that there is something immoral about such a large segment of the population being shut out of law school. however, my knee-jerk answer isn't to berate the lsat or excoriate law schools for having competitive standards. i think it would be great for schools to try and aggressively reach out to qualified urms, but i also think that in the long run only big systemic reforms will be sufficient to eventually close the pervasive achievement gap that we're ultimately talking about here.

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Re: Law School Admissions Lag Among Minorities

Postby mikeyp » Sun Jan 10, 2010 4:35 am

billyez wrote:I'm not seeing this and I think it's really odd that people see minorities as thinking differently as a "collective group". Law school is an individual experience whether your in the majority or minority. Beyond that, I disagree entirely with your assertion because it's a gross generalization. I will agree that first-generation college graduates do feel that pressure to move up in the world...our parents make that expressly clear.

I'm seeing a lot of people making generalizations about the way URM's approach the application process; they must apply to only the top schools, they must do it half-heartedly, etc. How about we just stick to the study itself rather than making assumptions?

Speaking of the study, I'm rather shocked by the low GPA of African Americans. According to that study I'm an outlier in terms of GPA - especially if my graduating instituion GPA is observed. I'm also surprised by the super-low rate of applications made by Mexican-Americans especially when compared to the number of AA applications.

The point of the matter is 64 percent of AA's and 46 percent of Mexican-Americans who applied to law school from 2003 to 2008 were denied admission to every single law schoolt hat they applied to. You can say what you want, but you can't make me believe that of those 64 percent more than half of them only applied to the top ranked schools. I admit, the argument of the study would be a heck of a lot more palatable and stronger if it compiled data of the schools that these folks applied too, but these applicants weren't any different from us. When I got rejected from UT and Georgetown I widened my net and applied to lower ranked schools. You folks probably did the same if you were rejected from higher schools. It's common sense. I don't see why you can make the assumption that 64 percent of AA law applicants and 46 percent of Mexican-American applicants applied to the Top 20, got rejected from all of them and didn't apply to any other schools.

And I understand the irrational Cooley hate here on TLS, but the study was done by someone from Columbia law, what the Cooley person said has nothing to do with the study itself.


I think we can agree that the article leaves out MANY details for anyone to make a rational conclusion. And besides, who said anything about "must"?

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GeePee
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Re: Law School Admissions Lag Among Minorities

Postby GeePee » Sun Jan 10, 2010 5:14 am

Generally, people feel that the longer the span of time over which trends are observed, the more reliable they are. Basic mathematics supports this intuition, ceteris paribus. Several other posters have pointed out basic flaws in the study such as relative gains, and unreliability of measures of central tendency (if the mean LSAT score among AA takers was 141, and the bottom 50% gained while the top 50% stayed more or less the same, is a change from a mean of 141 to 145 really all that signficant to admissions chances?). However, given the disparity in the numbers it is unlikely that these explain results entirely, especially the increase in absolute denial.

The probable answer is that the ceteris paribus assumption is fundamentally flawed, in this case. In fact, 2 things stick out as major changes over the time. The first is that in 1993, the LSAT changed. The second is the emergence of USNews Rankings. Current standards of reporting GPA and LSAT medians force the schools to deal with a very real consequence each time they go to admit a URM candidate; generally, at least one and often both of their medians will be affected by the decision to admit this candidate. In 1993, the admissions process was such that a compelling story was possibly sufficient cause to admit a low-numbers candidate. Now, it becomes difficult for schools (take, for example, UVA who has tried diligently to maintain its medians) to risk over-enrollment by admitting an additional URM candidate, knowing that it might require the concurrent enrollment of an above both median candidate who would demand significant money, and would have a low likelihood of enrollment. This is seen through schools' nearly uniform process of leaving URM candidates until later in the cycle to grant most decisions.

This kind of marginal thinking, in aggregate, leads to lower numbers of URM enrollments. And, the mathematical plurality of individuals who have marginal LSAT scores and GPAs will be hard-pressed to find an institution willing to take on the low numbers. So, you really have a chain reaction of downward forces.

For this example, the most important part of using "ceteris paribus" numerical analysis is that the significance of these data must remain the same. However, GPA and LSAT have not stayed at the same level of importance over the 15 year period. Rather, they have increased in value. As such, despite the possibility of a closing numerical gap between white and minority candidates, the change in significance can magnify these smaller differences to a scale that produces a greater effect.

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IAFG
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Re: Law School Admissions Lag Among Minorities

Postby IAFG » Sun Jan 10, 2010 5:59 am

GeePee wrote:Generally, people feel that the longer the span of time over which trends are observed, the more reliable they are. Basic mathematics supports this intuition, ceteris paribus. Several other posters have pointed out basic flaws in the study such as relative gains, and unreliability of measures of central tendency (if the mean LSAT score among AA takers was 141, and the bottom 50% gained while the top 50% stayed more or less the same, is a change from a mean of 141 to 145 really all that signficant to admissions chances?). However, given the disparity in the numbers it is unlikely that these explain results entirely, especially the increase in absolute denial.

The probable answer is that the ceteris paribus assumption is fundamentally flawed, in this case. In fact, 2 things stick out as major changes over the time. The first is that in 1993, the LSAT changed. The second is the emergence of USNews Rankings. Current standards of reporting GPA and LSAT medians force the schools to deal with a very real consequence each time they go to admit a URM candidate; generally, at least one and often both of their medians will be affected by the decision to admit this candidate. In 1993, the admissions process was such that a compelling story was possibly sufficient cause to admit a low-numbers candidate. Now, it becomes difficult for schools (take, for example, UVA who has tried diligently to maintain its medians) to risk over-enrollment by admitting an additional URM candidate, knowing that it might require the concurrent enrollment of an above both median candidate who would demand significant money, and would have a low likelihood of enrollment. This is seen through schools' nearly uniform process of leaving URM candidates until later in the cycle to grant most decisions.

This kind of marginal thinking, in aggregate, leads to lower numbers of URM enrollments. And, the mathematical plurality of individuals who have marginal LSAT scores and GPAs will be hard-pressed to find an institution willing to take on the low numbers. So, you really have a chain reaction of downward forces.

For this example, the most important part of using "ceteris paribus" numerical analysis is that the significance of these data must remain the same. However, GPA and LSAT have not stayed at the same level of importance over the 15 year period. Rather, they have increased in value. As such, despite the possibility of a closing numerical gap between white and minority candidates, the change in significance can magnify these smaller differences to a scale that produces a greater effect.

tl;didn't even skim

<3 you GP

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Fancy Pants
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Re: Law School Admissions Lag Among Minorities

Postby Fancy Pants » Sun Jan 10, 2010 11:17 am

IAFG wrote:
GeePee wrote:smart people stuff and some latin phrases

tl;didn't even skim

<3 you GP


:D

GP nailed it. [/thread]

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Re: Law School Admissions Lag Among Minorities

Postby APimpNamedSlickback » Sun Jan 10, 2010 4:46 pm

GeePee wrote:Generally, people feel that the longer the span of time over which trends are observed, the more reliable they are. Basic mathematics supports this intuition, ceteris paribus. Several other posters have pointed out basic flaws in the study such as relative gains, and unreliability of measures of central tendency (if the mean LSAT score among AA takers was 141, and the bottom 50% gained while the top 50% stayed more or less the same, is a change from a mean of 141 to 145 really all that signficant to admissions chances?). However, given the disparity in the numbers it is unlikely that these explain results entirely, especially the increase in absolute denial.

The probable answer is that the ceteris paribus assumption is fundamentally flawed, in this case. In fact, 2 things stick out as major changes over the time. The first is that in 1993, the LSAT changed. The second is the emergence of USNews Rankings. Current standards of reporting GPA and LSAT medians force the schools to deal with a very real consequence each time they go to admit a URM candidate; generally, at least one and often both of their medians will be affected by the decision to admit this candidate. In 1993, the admissions process was such that a compelling story was possibly sufficient cause to admit a low-numbers candidate. Now, it becomes difficult for schools (take, for example, UVA who has tried diligently to maintain its medians) to risk over-enrollment by admitting an additional URM candidate, knowing that it might require the concurrent enrollment of an above both median candidate who would demand significant money, and would have a low likelihood of enrollment. This is seen through schools' nearly uniform process of leaving URM candidates until later in the cycle to grant most decisions.

This kind of marginal thinking, in aggregate, leads to lower numbers of URM enrollments. And, the mathematical plurality of individuals who have marginal LSAT scores and GPAs will be hard-pressed to find an institution willing to take on the low numbers. So, you really have a chain reaction of downward forces.

For this example, the most important part of using "ceteris paribus" numerical analysis is that the significance of these data must remain the same. However, GPA and LSAT have not stayed at the same level of importance over the 15 year period. Rather, they have increased in value. As such, despite the possibility of a closing numerical gap between white and minority candidates, the change in significance can magnify these smaller differences to a scale that produces a greater effect.


here geepee goes again with his mean-spirited bigotry thinly veiled with obscure econ 101 latin and insightful analysis.

+10, seriously though this was great

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Borhas
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Re: Law School Admissions Lag Among Minorities

Postby Borhas » Sun Jan 10, 2010 6:04 pm

talibkweli wrote:look i am a black male from an inner city with a 174 and no t14 acceptances yet, so i'm in no mood to be sympathetic towards people who rail against the supposed urm bump. every time i look at lsn there is another white or asian person with WORSE numbers than me just pwning the hell out of my cycle. this is michigan vs appalachian state--i went in heavily favored only to be humiliated at the end.

i really am not feeling intellectually curious enough to debate big picture stuff right now, but hey just to put it out there, the article sucks b/c it doesnt address the possibility that white and asians have had faster increases in scores.


Do you think anyones in the mood to feel sympathetic to some guy that's complaining about other people's cycles without even having a rejection yet?

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Re: Law School Admissions Lag Among Minorities

Postby APimpNamedSlickback » Sun Jan 10, 2010 6:17 pm

Borhas wrote:
talibkweli wrote:look i am a black male from an inner city with a 174 and no t14 acceptances yet, so i'm in no mood to be sympathetic towards people who rail against the supposed urm bump. every time i look at lsn there is another white or asian person with WORSE numbers than me just pwning the hell out of my cycle. this is michigan vs appalachian state--i went in heavily favored only to be humiliated at the end.

i really am not feeling intellectually curious enough to debate big picture stuff right now, but hey just to put it out there, the article sucks b/c it doesnt address the possibility that white and asians have had faster increases in scores.


Do you think anyones in the mood to feel sympathetic to some guy that's complaining about other people's cycles without even having a rejection yet?


so, "i currently have no t14 acceptances" apparently equals "i have no rejections."

good work.

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Re: Law School Admissions Lag Among Minorities

Postby rundoxierun » Sun Jan 10, 2010 6:26 pm

talibkweli wrote:
Borhas wrote:
talibkweli wrote:look i am a black male from an inner city with a 174 and no t14 acceptances yet, so i'm in no mood to be sympathetic towards people who rail against the supposed urm bump. every time i look at lsn there is another white or asian person with WORSE numbers than me just pwning the hell out of my cycle. this is michigan vs appalachian state--i went in heavily favored only to be humiliated at the end.

i really am not feeling intellectually curious enough to debate big picture stuff right now, but hey just to put it out there, the article sucks b/c it doesnt address the possibility that white and asians have had faster increases in scores.


Do you think anyones in the mood to feel sympathetic to some guy that's complaining about other people's cycles without even having a rejection yet?


so, "i currently have no t14 acceptances" apparently equals "i have no rejections." you must be a poster of herculean intellect.

i wasn't begging for sympathy, i was just anticipating where the thread seemed likely to go. also, how do you know that i haven't been rejected anywhere? i highly recommend that you try to not make blatantly unwarranted assumptions.


Well, have you been rejected anywhere???..

p.s. my advice to URMs is to live with the irrational fear that the URM boost does not exist. This fear has led me to take the LSAT and write all my application material the cycle before Im applying. I plan on asking for my recommendations after spring break, perfecting my ps/diversity statement over the summer and having all my applications ready to go the first day they are available. I'm no expert(only an undergrad junior) but I do think that people get wrapped up in the urm boost and take it easy a bit.

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billyez
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Re: Law School Admissions Lag Among Minorities

Postby billyez » Sun Jan 10, 2010 6:37 pm

Okay...my belief stands that this study is very worrisome, but when I showed my Dad this study the first two questions he asked were what did these folks score and where did they apply to? So, yes, I must cede that this is a major sticking point for thhe study.

For the life of me...143 and 2.96 average for AA's? No wonder my Dad huffed at those averages and said I had nothing to worry about. That makes my 160, 3.02 seem like a different category.

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IAFG
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Re: Law School Admissions Lag Among Minorities

Postby IAFG » Sun Jan 10, 2010 6:38 pm

tkgrrett wrote:my advice to URMs is to live with the irrational fear that the URM boost does not exist. This fear has led me to take the LSAT and write all my application material the cycle before Im applying. I plan on asking for my recommendations after spring break, perfecting my ps/diversity statement over the summer and having all my applications ready to go the first day they are available. I'm no expert(only an undergrad junior) but I do think that people get wrapped up in the urm boost and take it easy a bit.

very wise

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billyez
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Re: Law School Admissions Lag Among Minorities

Postby billyez » Sun Jan 10, 2010 6:39 pm

tkgrrett wrote:Well, have you been rejected anywhere???..

p.s. my advice to URMs is to live with the irrational fear that the URM boost does not exist. This fear has led me to take the LSAT and write all my application material the cycle before Im applying. I plan on asking for my recommendations after spring break, perfecting my ps/diversity statement over the summer and having all my applications ready to go the first day they are available. I'm no expert(only an undergrad junior) but I do think that people get wrapped up in the urm boost and take it easy a bit.


What makes this so worrisome isn't that it can be noted as just a matter of URM's overestimating the URM boost. I'm not willing to say that 64 percent of AA applicants applied to top schools with unqualified numbers.

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Re: Law School Admissions Lag Among Minorities

Postby rundoxierun » Sun Jan 10, 2010 6:46 pm

billyez wrote:
tkgrrett wrote:Well, have you been rejected anywhere???..

p.s. my advice to URMs is to live with the irrational fear that the URM boost does not exist. This fear has led me to take the LSAT and write all my application material the cycle before Im applying. I plan on asking for my recommendations after spring break, perfecting my ps/diversity statement over the summer and having all my applications ready to go the first day they are available. I'm no expert(only an undergrad junior) but I do think that people get wrapped up in the urm boost and take it easy a bit.


What makes this so worrisome isn't that it can be noted as just a matter of URM's overestimating the URM boost. I'm not willing to say that 64 percent of AA applicants applied to top schools with unqualified numbers.



Definitely not 64% but I wouldnt doubt a significant percentage are (20-30%). I know a few AAs applying to only t20 schools with a 158 LSAT and 3.4 GPA in Criminology. Speaking of which, many URM think any major related to the law (criminology, criminal justice, pre-law studies, etc.) will be favored by law schools.

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Re: Law School Admissions Lag Among Minorities

Postby billyez » Sun Jan 10, 2010 6:54 pm

The sad thing is, according to LSAT, a 158 and a 3.4 would be excellent for a URM. This is making me want to spend another year to get up to a 3.4 myself...




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