URM/ Non-tradtional - Personal Statement

(Personal Statement Examples, Advice, Critique, . . . )
Silence Dogood
Posts: 12
Joined: Fri Dec 11, 2009 2:38 am

URM/ Non-tradtional - Personal Statement

Postby Silence Dogood » Fri Dec 11, 2009 2:51 am

So here it is. For about two years I have been stalking this site. This is my first post and of course it is when I truly needed some advice or critiques from relative strangers.

I would really appreciate it if you would take a look at my PS.


For a fleeting moment after high school graduation, my future was bright. But midway through my second semester of college, I found out I was going to be a mother; and, from that moment forward, my life changed radically.

As a young, single mother, I quit school and worked three jobs in order to rent a small apartment and to keep the lights on. My weekend job consisted of cleaning the floors, dishes and toilets of strangers, to make sure we paid rent on time. In these early, gray days, my daughter and I struggled merely to survive; and, it was here, in these moments over a porcelain latrine, where I learned the value of hard work and the satisfaction of a job well done.

Seven years later, I found myself a divorced mother of two. My newborn son’s Cerebral Palsy had taken a toll on my marriage, my immediate family, and my savings. Again, I resumed the multiple job status; and, once more, I freelanced as a toilet scrubber. From this lowly position, I would think of my children. It was in these hours, I became acquainted with the true definition of self-sacrifice.

Three years ago, I had a conversation that would change everything. During lunch an old high school friend asked me pointedly, “XXX, if you could be anything what would you be?” I fumbled for an answer; I had not been asked this question in almost a decade. “I cannot just be anything,” I retorted somewhat annoyed by the question. “I cannot go back to school; I have to work to support my family,” I explained. “Pretend you are rich and you do not have to work,” he pressed, “What would you be?” I responded flatly, “It does not matter if I am rich or not, I still cannot or could not. I don’t have a babysitter that I would trust with my son. I only trust my parents with him, and they are getting old.” I was hoping this would be the end of the interrogation, but it continued. “Well, pretend they lived next door to you and they were twenty years younger.” This back and forth continued for a solid ten minutes. For every reason I gave of why I could not, he would create a hypothetical solution to my dilemma. Finally, speaking very slowly and enunciating every syllable he asked, “What --would--you--be?” In a small, still voice, I simply said, “I… always dreamed of being a lawyer.”

Being a lawyer was the path that I had set out on so many years earlier as a bright-eyed high school graduate. The concepts of justice and fairness drew me towards this calling. I wanted to help people, those “others” who were marginalized by society and lacked the power and privilege that money often affords. I wanted to give a voice to the underrepresented masses and genuinely make a difference in the lives of others. However, my life got in the way. For years, I could not contemplate how a single mother of two children, one being disabled, could survive, physically and monetarily, through three years of law school, not counting four years of college. I quelled that dream and placed it neatly into a realm of what could have been, if my life had been different.

For months, this conversation haunted me. Eventually, I realized that I had only given myself excuses for why I could not achieve these goals. Never once had I given myself a reason of why I could or should. I became conscious that my life had not prevented me from obtaining my dream; but, paradoxically, it had helped me. I had learned how to cope and survive some of the hardest times in life through hard work. My life had taught me that a job well done could drive one from mediocrity to success. During the past ten years, I had discovered the concept of self-sacrifice, which has only furthered my resolve to help those who are less fortunate. For nearly a decade, I limited my dreams of what I could do, who I could become. Yet, I have come to realize that the tools I collected along the way were essential and necessary in becoming the type of person and lawyer that I long to be. Immediately after this newfound awareness, perhaps for the first time, I stood and appreciated my life, recognizing that because of my past experiences I would thrive in law school and walk out holding onto the ideals of helping others that drew me to this calling initially. My eyes were opened; and, three months later, I enrolled in college, leaving my excuses at the door forevermore.

For the past three years, I have taken course loads of up to 21 hours, worked full time, raised my children, and kept a straight A average. I have graduated magna cum laude, been on the Dean’s list consistently, and was inducted as a member of a national honor society. This past year, I worked in a law firm, volunteered for a women’s abuse shelter, published my first article, and tutored fellow students. As I stand on the summit of this once unconquerable mountain, I look back and realize the strength encapsulated in the word determination. This has been my greatest life lesson.

Three years ago, I would have muttered the words, “They don’t let people like me into law school.” Today, I stand upright, head held high, and declare, “They want people just like me in law school.”

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IHaveDietMoxie
Posts: 137
Joined: Wed Dec 10, 2008 3:54 am

Re: URM/ Non-tradtional - Personal Statement

Postby IHaveDietMoxie » Fri Dec 11, 2009 4:21 am

So basically, I think you have a really awesome and inspiring story and it sounds like you will do really great in ls. I think your statement can really be condensed in certain areas and expanded in others. When you are talking about how hard you had it, try to shorten it up, as the facts speak for themselves (wow, by the way). I kind of cut up the first half just to show you what I might do to limit the length while retaining the essentials, though obviously you'll want to do it your own way.

I think you have to be careful in the 5th/6th paragraphs, because everybody will be saying things like these. This is not to say that articulating your ideals is not important, but that the audience you are playing to has heard these same statements a thousand different ways, so keep it short while retaining essentials. They are trying to get a picture of you, so the fact that you have always aspired to ideals like social justice and your difficult past has prepared you for being a lawyer is great and important, but taking up ten lines to do that might not be in your best interest, particularly when you have so much left to reveal.

I think once you have condensed, you can then expand by adding a paragraph or two on the stuff you mention in the second to last paragraph. You've convinced us that you are determined, hard-working, and fair minded, but we need more from the angle of your intellectual interests and capacity for action. I would probably talk in a little more detail about one, or maybe two experiences mentioned in that closing. I would love to hear about how you turned those long lived aspirations into action working in a women's defense clinic...something along these lines would be very helpful I think.

Just my two cents. Hope this helps, and congratulations on coming so far, truly inspiring.

Silence Dogood wrote:[strike]For a fleeting moment after high school graduation, my future was bright.[/strike]My future seemed bright after graduating from high school . But midway through my second semester of college, I found out I was going to be a mother[strike], and,[/strike], [strike]and from that moment forward my life changed radically.[/strike]changing my life forever.

[strike]As a young, single mother,[/strike] As a young single mother I quit school and worked three jobs [strike]in order[/strike] to [strike]rent a small apartment and to keep the lights on.[/strike]support my child. [strike]My weekend job consisted of cleaning[/strike] On the weekends I cleanedthe floors, dishes and toilets of strangers[strike], to make sure we paid rent on time[/strike]. [strike]In these early, gray days, my daughter and I struggled merely to survive; and, it was here, in these moments over a porcelain latrine, where I learned the value of hard work and the satisfaction of a job well done.[/strike]My daughter and I struggled merely to survive, and over a porcelain latrine I learned the value of a job well done.

Seven years later,[strike]I found myself a divorced mother of two. M[/strike]my newborn son’s Cerebral Palsy had taken a toll on my marriage, my immediate family, and my savings, resulting in divorce. Again, I [strike]resumed the multiple job status[/strike]took multiple jobs[strike]; and, once more, I freelanced[/strike], freelancing as a toilet scrubber.From this lowly position, I would think of my children. [strike]It was in these hours, I became acquainted with the true definition of self-sacrifice.[/strike]
Ok I think here you could combine par's 2 and 3(you could even combine all three first par.'s) and use the ending from par. 2 to close it..I like the porcelain latrine line, and I would use it to cap a conclusion that combines the self-sacrifice and value of hard work conclusions, as these apply to both periods you discuss here. This should save a ton of space.



Three years ago, I had a conversation that would change everything. During lunch an old high school friend asked me pointedly, “XXX, if you could be anything what would you be?” I fumbled for an answer; I had not been asked this question in almost a decade. “I cannot just be anything,” I retorted somewhat annoyed by the question. “I cannot go back to school; I have to work to support my family,” I explained. “Pretend you are rich and you do not have to work,” he pressed, “What would you be?” I responded flatly, “It does not matter if I am rich or not, I still cannot or could not. I don’t have a babysitter that I would trust with my son. I only trust my parents with him, and they are getting old.” I was hoping this would be the end of the interrogation, but it continued. “Well, pretend they lived next door to you and they were twenty years younger.” This back and forth continued for a solid ten minutes. For every reason I gave of why I could not, he would create a hypothetical solution to my dilemma. Finally, speaking very slowly and enunciating every syllable he asked, “What --would--you--be?” In a small, still voice, I simply said, “I… always dreamed of being a lawyer.”
Ok, here I would probably rethink this whole paragraph. Adcom doesn't care about your conversation with your friend, adcom cares about you. You don't have to kill the conversation motif, but don't let it eat up the page. This doesn't reveal much of anything about who you are beyond the fact that your dream has always been to be a lawyer, even if you didn't know it. This can be communicated in a single sentence and it robs you of a huge amount of space. This needs to be like 2 lines at the very most, and combined with the following paragraph.


Being a lawyer was the path that I had set out on so many years earlier as a bright-eyed high school graduate. The concepts of justice and fairness drew me towards this calling. I wanted to help people, those “others” who were marginalized by society and lacked the power and privilege that money often affords. I wanted to give a voice to the underrepresented masses and genuinely make a difference in the lives of others. However, my life got in the way. For years, I could not contemplate how a single mother of two children, one being disabled, could survive, physically and monetarily, through three years of law school, not counting four years of college. I quelled that dream and placed it neatly into a realm of what could have been, if my life had been different.

For months, this conversation haunted me. Eventually, I realized that I had only given myself excuses for why I could not achieve these goals. Never once had I given myself a reason of why I could or should. I became conscious that my life had not prevented me from obtaining my dream; but, paradoxically, it had helped me. I had learned how to cope and survive some of the hardest times in life through hard work. My life had taught me that a job well done could drive one from mediocrity to success. During the past ten years, I had discovered the concept of self-sacrifice, which has only furthered my resolve to help those who are less fortunate. For nearly a decade, I limited my dreams of what I could do, who I could become. Yet, I have come to realize that the tools I collected along the way were essential and necessary in becoming the type of person and lawyer that I long to be. Immediately after this newfound awareness, perhaps for the first time, I stood and appreciated my life, recognizing that because of my past experiences I would thrive in law school and walk out holding onto the ideals of helping others that drew me to this calling initially. My eyes were opened; and, three months later, I enrolled in college, leaving my excuses at the door forevermore.

For the past three years, I have taken course loads of up to 21 hours, worked full time, raised my children, and kept a straight A average. I have graduated magna cum laude, been on the Dean’s list consistently, and was inducted as a member of a national honor society. This past year, I worked in a law firm, volunteered for a women’s abuse shelter, published my first article, and tutored fellow students. As I stand on the summit of this once unconquerable mountain, I look back and realize the strength encapsulated in the word determination. This has been my greatest life lesson.
Ok this is a great paragraph...I want to hear more though. I would like to hear about your experiences at the law firm, abuse shelter, etc.Maybe you could expand this into another paragraph with a little more detail about what interests you about law.
Three years ago, I would have muttered the words, “They don’t let people like me into law school.” Today, I stand upright, head held high, and declare, “They want people just like me in law school.”

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Nom Sawyer
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Re: URM/ Non-tradtional - Personal Statement

Postby Nom Sawyer » Fri Dec 11, 2009 4:24 am

Don't have time to edit it for you right now (sorry.. writing my own final papers and cruising TLS for a momentary distraction).. but just want to say your PS is very well written, and more important than that, very, very unique.

Wish you the best of luck with your applications and law school experience!

Silence Dogood
Posts: 12
Joined: Fri Dec 11, 2009 2:38 am

Re: URM/ Non-tradtional - Personal Statement

Postby Silence Dogood » Fri Dec 11, 2009 10:01 pm

I really appreciate the critique and the "Atta girl" from both of you. I will work on the next draft and try to improve upon it using the suggestions. Again, thank you so much.

I do have a general question however, concerning the last two lines:

Three years ago I would have muttered the words, “They don’t let people like me into law school.” Today, I stand upright, head held high, and declare, “They want people just like me in law school.”

Does anyone feel that it is presumptuous to assert that "they want people just like me in law school?" I am trying to consider how an adcomm may perceive this line.

Any opinions or feed back would be appreciated.

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Nom Sawyer
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Re: URM/ Non-tradtional - Personal Statement

Postby Nom Sawyer » Fri Dec 11, 2009 10:06 pm

Silence Dogood wrote:I really appreciate the critique and the "Atta girl" from both of you. I will work on the next draft and try to improve upon it using the suggestions. Again, thank you so much.

I do have a general question however, concerning the last two lines:

Three years ago I would have muttered the words, “They don’t let people like me into law school.” Today, I stand upright, head held high, and declare, “They want people just like me in law school.”

Does anyone feel that it is presumptuous to assert that "they want people just like me in law school?" I am trying to consider how an adcomm may perceive this line.

Any opinions or feed back would be appreciated.


I think its fine, the personal statement is supposed to be about presenting yourself as a great candidate for law school and also the phrase offers a good counterpoint to your opening lines.

Renee
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Joined: Sat Oct 24, 2009 8:20 am

Re: URM/ Non-tradtional - Personal Statement

Postby Renee » Thu Feb 11, 2010 7:46 pm

I think that your personal statement is so inspiring. I would like to congratulate you on your acheivments.

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JustDude
Posts: 354
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Re: URM/ Non-tradtional - Personal Statement

Postby JustDude » Fri Feb 12, 2010 2:49 am

Will be constructive here, sorry

For a fleeting moment after high school graduation, my future was bright. But midway through my second semester of college, I found out I was going to be a mother; and, from that moment forward, my life changed radically.

As a young, single mother, I quit school and worked three jobs in order to rent a small apartment and to keep the lights on. My weekend job consisted of cleaning the floors, dishes and toilets of strangers, to make sure we paid rent on time. In these early, gray days, my daughter and I struggled merely to survive; and, it was here, in these moments over a porcelain latrine, where I learned the value of hard work and the satisfaction of a job well done.


Value of hard work or meaning???

Seven years later, I found myself a divorced mother of two. My newborn son’s Cerebral Palsy had taken a toll on my marriage, my immediate family, and my savings. Again, I resumed the multiple job status; and, once more, I freelanced as a toilet scrubber. From this lowly position, I would think of my children. It was in these hours, I became acquainted with the true definition of self-sacrifice.


"toilet scrubber", "lowly position". Kinda derogatory. I mean I know you were doing this job, but still, be respectful. Plus "true definition of self-sacrifice" is a bit presuptious. Millions of people live even worse, (evenin US), and many more outside US. The only difference between you and them is that you decided to gp back to college and eventually to Law School. But sacrifice itself is not that special. Do not reject those experiences. Rather, show hoe they changed you into a different better person. That will make you stand out from the pool of other applicants.

Three years ago, I had a conversation that would change everything. During lunch an old high school friend asked me pointedly, “XXX, if you could be anything what would you be?” I fumbled for an answer; I had not been asked this question in almost a decade. “I cannot just be anything,” I retorted somewhat annoyed by the question. “I cannot go back to school; I have to work to support my family,” I explained. “Pretend you are rich and you do not have to work,” he pressed, “What would you be?” I responded flatly, “It does not matter if I am rich or not, I still cannot or could not. I don’t have a babysitter that I would trust with my son. I only trust my parents with him, and they are getting old.” I was hoping this would be the end of the interrogation, but it continued. “Well, pretend they lived next door to you and they were twenty years younger.” This back and forth continued for a solid ten minutes. For every reason I gave of why I could not, he would create a hypothetical solution to my dilemma. Finally, speaking very slowly and enunciating every syllable he asked, “What --would--you--be?” In a small, still voice, I simply said, “I… always dreamed of being a lawyer.”

Thats gotta go. It really pissed me off. I mean, isnt clear what he meant by using "would". I mean it was a stupid question to ask, especially ask a mother of two this question. But why couldnt you get meaning for 10 minutes. and why was this idiot pressing on??? May be you didnt want to answer. What happened to courtesy? Did it just dissapear. I know what you are trying to say, but rewrite it. It doesnt need to be elaborate.

Being a lawyer was the path that I had set out on so many years earlier as a bright-eyed high school graduate. The concepts of justice and fairness drew me towards this calling. I wanted to help people, those “others” who were marginalized by society and lacked the power and privilege that money often affords. I wanted to give a voice to the underrepresented masses and genuinely make a difference in the lives of others. However, my life got in the way. For years, I could not contemplate how a single mother of two children, one being disabled, could survive, physically and monetarily, through three years of law school, not counting four years of college. I quelled that dream and placed it neatly into a realm of what could have been, if my life had been different.



I think it would look better if you write that your experiences changed you and motivated to be a lawyer. Having a "child" dream and fulfilling it is not as strong. Kinda like on a whim. May be you want to rethink it.You can make it stronger by incorporating your new experiences. May be its somehow strenghten your resolve or something. It's not bad, but your strong experiences gotta had effect on you.

Three years ago, I would have muttered the words, “They don’t let people like me into law school.” Today, I stand upright, head held high, and declare, “They want people just like me in law school.”


Presumptious. I mean, may be you meant you are more ready to Law School.


Overall interesting story. Memorable. Suitable for PS. But I prefer PS that tell qualities of the applicant, not stories. But as it is, it will still work for me.

Silence Dogood
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Re: URM/ Non-tradtional - Personal Statement

Postby Silence Dogood » Sun Apr 04, 2010 12:43 am

Want to tell you guys that I used this PS and got into my first pick, but even more important I got some scholarship money. I desperately needed this money to make this dream viable, and the letter came last weekend. I wanted to thank you guys who took the time to read this and respond.

Tier 1 here I come!

OmbreGracieuse
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Re: URM/ Non-tradtional - Personal Statement

Postby OmbreGracieuse » Tue Apr 06, 2010 11:02 pm

I agree with the first poster about possibly condensing your 5th and 6th paragraphs. There are going to be a ton of students suggesting that they've always wanted to be a lawyer. I think it gets a little muddled in the diologue as well. I would love to hear more about your defense clinic work as well. I think you could draw ties to where you were in your life before your journey started (possibly).

I am a mother too and will be looking to apply for law school in the fall as well. I only have one however and she just turned 1. We are in different boats, however I know it isn't easy. Congratuations! :)

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Drake014
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Re: URM/ Non-tradtional - Personal Statement

Postby Drake014 » Tue Apr 06, 2010 11:08 pm

JustDude is a total asshole but he knows how to critique a PS.

Your story is excellent. I don't mean to sound like an asshole, but I am curious: given the circumstances, why'd you decide to have a second child when you did?

OmbreGracieuse
Posts: 254
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Re: URM/ Non-tradtional - Personal Statement

Postby OmbreGracieuse » Wed Apr 07, 2010 6:31 pm

Silence Dogood wrote:Want to tell you guys that I used this PS and got into my first pick, but even more important I got some scholarship money. I desperately needed this money to make this dream viable, and the letter came last weekend. I wanted to thank you guys who took the time to read this and respond.

Tier 1 here I come!



CONGRATULATIONS! I am so excited for you! I feel that there are not enough mothers in the law field, and I feel that if you can do it, it gives hope to all the mothers looking to get into law school. :)

Silence Dogood
Posts: 12
Joined: Fri Dec 11, 2009 2:38 am

Re: URM/ Non-tradtional - Personal Statement

Postby Silence Dogood » Sat Jan 28, 2012 4:25 pm

So, I have moved onto my second year of law school. It has been difficult, challenging and in every way overwhelming. But, I am here and thriving; nope scratch that - making it.

I have however, made dean's list two out of three semesters and I made Journal. YEAH!!! I'm not sure how that is possible considering the amazing talent and intellect of my fellow students. But I do have one motto that has helped me, and I guess, I hope that it helps one of you too.

When I am in class I look to the left and right of me and I know that I am not smarter than these folks. However, I know that I can work harder than all of them. That much I can control. To me, that has made that difference in my GPA and work product. Just outwork them.

This Summer I will be working for the largest firm in our area - paid to boot! I am thrilled that my little family will have some income coming in.

I guess I wanted to remind all the mothers that I know are out there searching this board to keep pressing forward. Don't give up and just outwork them.

postn0bills
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Re: URM/ Non-tradtional - Personal Statement

Postby postn0bills » Sat Jan 28, 2012 8:42 pm

Silence Dogood wrote:So, I have moved onto my second year of law school. It has been difficult, challenging and in every way overwhelming. But, I am here and thriving; nope scratch that - making it.

I have however, made dean's list two out of three semesters and I made Journal. YEAH!!! I'm not sure how that is possible considering the amazing talent and intellect of my fellow students. But I do have one motto that has helped me, and I guess, I hope that it helps one of you too.

When I am in class I look to the left and right of me and I know that I am not smarter than these folks. However, I know that I can work harder than all of them. That much I can control. To me, that has made that difference in my GPA and work product. Just outwork them.

This Summer I will be working for the largest firm in our area - paid to boot! I am thrilled that my little family will have some income coming in.

I guess I wanted to remind all the mothers that I know are out there searching this board to keep pressing forward. Don't give up and just outwork them.


Congratulations -- your story is truly inspiring, keep the updates coming!!

Silence Dogood
Posts: 12
Joined: Fri Dec 11, 2009 2:38 am

Re: URM/ Non-tradtional - Personal Statement

Postby Silence Dogood » Sat Mar 16, 2013 5:21 pm

Well here I am! Yet again, I wanted to update this post and tell you all where I am in the process. It has been a long road since I first posted this PS (this year will be 4 years since that first post). But today, I am 5 weeks away from graduation. I have maintained my GPA and will still graduate within the top 15% - which is a feat. CUM LAUDE here I come (YES, I am very proud of this!). This process has been the most academically challenging thing I have EVER undertaken. It has pushed me to the brink time and again. Yet, each time I stand up and ask for more.

To those who are just starting out. IT IS DO-ABLE. It will consume you for 3 years but it will not defeat you as long as you stand back up each time. For those of you who are attempting to do this with children in tow - and I know that you are out there - in a strange way - it is easier.

It was always easier for me to be up at 3 am knowing what my kids had put on the line in order for me to be here. If I was tired - it only took a moment to remember their sacrifice. They had left their friends and their family - their safety net - to come with me. They had given up a lot and I was not going to let them down.

I am here to tell you that your family does not have to be a ball-and-chain. They can be the source that you draw strength from. Kids or not - whatever it is that makes you strong -- cherish it -- cradle it in some small place and keep it close - you will need it.

What I want to caution you all about is to not let this place change you. For those of you who read my PS again I told the truth but during my time here at school I did change. Somewhere along the line I lost those ideals I spoke about.

I began to see dollar signs and feed into the hype of big money law. That is not what brought me to school. I genuinely wanted to help others.
THAT WAS MY DREAM. But somehow this place will change you if you let it. It was only until my last year did I sit back and think about what brought me here - and only then did I realize that I had changed. I refocused and remembered what was important to me. Who I was. What I was about.

I guess what I want most for all of you is to stay true to who you are. If you want big law fight for it. If you want to help others the same holds true. But at the end of the day understand that this place will change you if you let it. Guard your ideals ferociously. But live YOUR dream - not the dream of the others who are on either side of you.

I hope this helps someone out there.

Silence Dogood signing off.
Class of 2013

jhertirac
Posts: 19
Joined: Fri Nov 09, 2012 2:45 am

Re: URM/ Non-tradtional - Personal Statement

Postby jhertirac » Mon Mar 18, 2013 3:14 am

Silence Dogood wrote:Well here I am! Yet again, I wanted to update this post and tell you all where I am in the process. It has been a long road since I first posted this PS (this year will be 4 years since that first post). But today, I am 5 weeks away from graduation. I have maintained my GPA and will still graduate within the top 15% - which is a feat. CUM LAUDE here I come (YES, I am very proud of this!). This process has been the most academically challenging thing I have EVER undertaken. It has pushed me to the brink time and again. Yet, each time I stand up and ask for more.

To those who are just starting out. IT IS DO-ABLE. It will consume you for 3 years but it will not defeat you as long as you stand back up each time. For those of you who are attempting to do this with children in tow - and I know that you are out there - in a strange way - it is easier.

It was always easier for me to be up at 3 am knowing what my kids had put on the line in order for me to be here. If I was tired - it only took a moment to remember their sacrifice. They had left their friends and their family - their safety net - to come with me. They had given up a lot and I was not going to let them down.

I am here to tell you that your family does not have to be a ball-and-chain. They can be the source that you draw strength from. Kids or not - whatever it is that makes you strong -- cherish it -- cradle it in some small place and keep it close - you will need it.

What I want to caution you all about is to not let this place change you. For those of you who read my PS again I told the truth but during my time here at school I did change. Somewhere along the line I lost those ideals I spoke about.

I began to see dollar signs and feed into the hype of big money law. That is not what brought me to school. I genuinely wanted to help others.
THAT WAS MY DREAM. But somehow this place will change you if you let it. It was only until my last year did I sit back and think about what brought me here - and only then did I realize that I had changed. I refocused and remembered what was important to me. Who I was. What I was about.

I guess what I want most for all of you is to stay true to who you are. If you want big law fight for it. If you want to help others the same holds true. But at the end of the day understand that this place will change you if you let it. Guard your ideals ferociously. But live YOUR dream - not the dream of the others who are on either side of you.

I hope this helps someone out there.

Silence Dogood signing off.
Class of 2013



ABSOLUTELY INSPIRING!!! WOW... AND NOW YOU ARE ABOUT TO GRADUATE... I LOVE THIS!




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