Operation: Enduring Yale 250s

(Personal Statement Examples, Advice, Critique, . . . )
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theadw
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Re: Operation: Enduring Yale 250s

Postby theadw » Tue Apr 13, 2010 4:42 pm

Cycle's over -- reviving this thread for the benefit of future applicants.

edited to note that I had the good fortune to be admitted.

theadw's 250 wrote:Certain twentieth century artworks challenged longstanding definitions of art by carrying the
concept of mimesis to its logical conclusion. Pieces like Warhol’s Brillo Box or Duchamp’s Fountain are
perceptually indistinguishable from commonplace Brillo boxes and urinals; this indistinguishability
jeopardizes the ontological discreteness of art by breaching the boundary between art and everything else.

In response, Arthur Danto, an eminent philosopher of art, attempts to refortify art qua ontological
category via redefinition. His “embodied meanings view” states that an object is art if and only if it (a)
has meaning and (b) embodies its meaning(s). Meeting the latter criterion demands that an object’s
meaning relate to its properties in a rational and explicable (not necessarily direct or obvious) fashion—
e.g., this essay embodies a thesis about art, but not about horticulture. Though Danto’s view alleviates
the indistinguishability problem—Brillo Box means something, a Brillo box doesn’t—it is still
overinclusive, as any number of things one would be loath to call art (this essay among them) have and
embody meanings.

Danto’s definition is unsatisfactory, but is also salvageable. Adding an adverbial criterion
specifying that an object’s aesthetic—related to but distinguished from perceptual—properties play an
ineliminable role in its embodying a meaning restricts the definition’s scope while retaining its ability to
properly categorize indistinguishables. The above distinction between Brillo Box and its counterpart
holds, and this essay fails to count as art as its meaning is entirely independent of its aesthetic properties.
Last edited by theadw on Tue Apr 20, 2010 12:46 pm, edited 1 time in total.

OmbreGracieuse
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Re: Operation: Enduring Yale 250s

Postby OmbreGracieuse » Wed Apr 14, 2010 9:12 pm

I am commenting here so I can revisit this thread easily later.

I have a Yale 250 question.

I am applying for LS this fall. I wrote my PS about overcoming adversity (long story short I am the first person to graduate from college in my family EVER. I had a crappy childhood and managed to beat- only to be diagnosed with ovarian cancer about a month and a half ago. I am really positive though. Rather than 'feel sorry for me' it conveys the 'I can finish out my semester and graduate 3.45+, WITH CANCER, I can totally rock the 1L look.), and wonder if I should go personal or academic on my 250. I wrote about my philosophy on stress; kind-of a lighthearted opinion of mine on finding the best in everything. I was hoping it would balance out some of the negative aspects of my PS (it mentions cancer and abuse-- both downers). I wonder though if I should leave my PS alone and talk about something different instead (like my thesis). I took 11 cities and compared crime rates and statistics, hoping to prove that crime is not a racial issue, it is a financial issue.

What do you think? Was I on the right track when I wrote the first one, or should I do the latter? Something completely different?

My first instinct was to write about crab nachos (one of my favorite foods!), but that seemed a little inappropriate. The Yale 250's here are so great-- I feel like mine misses a little of that academic wording since I was striving to create some form of a personal connection.

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GeePee
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Re: Operation: Enduring Yale 250s

Postby GeePee » Fri Apr 16, 2010 3:24 am

I took a calculated risk with my essay; unfortunately it didn't really pay off in Faculty Review (I did get there, though!).

I feel like my age and the lack of respect for my UG institution were probably bigger factors in my lack of acceptance. Personally, though, I love my 250. Here it is:

I have always had problems fitting in. One needs not a keen eye, nor a discerning demeanor to pick out those individuals who share my difficulties; in fact such people are arguably the easiest to see. Exchanges between the afflicted few express a mutual understanding of the challenges posed by a culture not suited for us. Each day we face an unfortunate reality: we are simply too tall.

The everyday constructs of society often demand certain compliance from the public, a conformity that attempts to weed out those who simply do not belong. To some extent society is successful. The head trauma caused by door frames, light fixtures, and the occasional ceiling fan, has on multiple occasions blurred my vision and stunted my advancement. I have searched and shopped for a used car not based on gas mileage or performance, but on my ability to contort my legs around the steering wheel. At constant odds with fashion, my pants are two inches too short and several inches too wide.

However, I have slowly learned to enjoy my inherent advantages. Time has given me the ability to stick out in a crowd, and as I have grown, it has become even easier to stand taller than those around me. While society may not neatly fit people like me, I embrace my duty to see the world from a different perspective. But, in spite of this tendency toward individuality, I still share a common desire with society:

I wish I were taller.

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tomhobbes
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Re: Operation: Enduring Yale 250s

Postby tomhobbes » Fri Apr 16, 2010 3:36 am

.
Last edited by tomhobbes on Fri Mar 04, 2011 3:17 am, edited 1 time in total.

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BioEBear2010
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Re: Operation: Enduring Yale 250s

Postby BioEBear2010 » Fri Apr 16, 2010 3:49 am

I'll play too. I got the idea for my 250 after visiting an art museum and later chatting with a friend about affirmative action -- my strange little brain decided to merge the two events.

A man examines Seurat’s Sunday Afternoon on the Grand Jatte. Inside the colorful piece of Pointillism, he sees them – a sea of point-like eyes paradoxically looking both up and down at him. They see his success and emulate him. They see his skin color and denigrate him. They celebrate his work, but resent his people. He is viewed not according to his merits, but rather by the historical burdens of his forebears. He desires equality, but it is nowhere to be found.

This spectacle of a man is you, me – all men, all women, all races. We are all judged by our appearance – it is simply a facet of human nature developed through evolution. However, while we cannot change the way individuals think, we can change the way they respond to these thoughts – namely, through legal action.

Antidiscrimination laws have been an effective deterrent against racial, sexual, and religious intolerance. However, while the beneficial effects of these laws cannot be understated, we must recognize that antidiscrimination practices have also sparked controversy. What types of historical discrimination count, and against what groups? How does one weigh diversity as a consideration in implementing affirmative action programs? Should we seek equality of opportunity, or of outcomes?

We have the finest legal system in the world, which tackles these divisive issues daily. The answers to these questions are still evolving. And to the man looking at the Seurat painting, we are striving for the equality you seek, both as lawyers and as human beings.

Stunlock
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Re: Operation: Enduring Yale 250s

Postby Stunlock » Fri Apr 16, 2010 4:16 am

I made a new profile for this to hide my identity... heads up though, I got rejected. With my numbers though, I wouldn't say the 250 did it.
-----------
Standing knee deep in a pool of tepid water during prime time for insect hatching, while staring at a salamander the size of your forearm may not sound very appealing to you, but it is this very image that gets me through dreary work days. My father is what you might call the quintessential outdoors-man, and he imparted his appreciation for the wilds of North Carolina at a very young age. Until two years ago though, fly-fishing was the type of gentleman's activity that I had only cared to watch on television.

I could never truly express what makes this type of activity so addictive, but there must be something, otherwise I wouldn’t continue to spend my weekends sleeping on the cold, hard ground only to awake at the break of dawn. Most any man my age would argue that weekends are for sleeping late, watching football, and playing video games. Until I tasted the sweet, crisp air of the Appalachian Mountains in the spring and fall, I was inclined to agree.

Since my first foray into the creeks and streams of western North Carolina, my thirst for similar activity has been insatiable. Whether it is fishing, camping, bird hunting, or shooting sporting clays, anything that puts me in the wild, ever changing outdoors is the only acceptable reprieve from days spent asleep and evenings spent toiling away in my laboratory job.

I suppose it should come as no surprise though, as I am very much my father’s son.
Last edited by Stunlock on Mon Apr 19, 2010 7:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.

salac
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Re: Operation: Enduring Yale 250s

Postby salac » Fri Apr 16, 2010 7:29 am

I was accepted, so I figure I would add mine:
Max the Scientist puts his cat Schrodinger into a box. This box will kill the cat if an atom fissions, a “quantum” event which occurs one half of the time.

The Many Worlds interpretation of this experiment says that, when Max runs the machine, the world splits into two distinct universes: one in which the particle fissions and Schrodinger dies, one in which the particle stays whole and so does the cat. Each universe also contains a Max the Scientist. When the Max’s look inside the box, they discover whether they are Max-One, who is in the universe with a live cat, or Max-Two, with a dead one.

As bizarre as this sounds, it is a very plausible way of translating quantum mechanical theory into the physical world with which we are familiar. But it has some strange consequences:

Max climbs into the box and triggers the experiment. The universe splits into two: one with a live Max, one with a dead Max. But the thing about being dead is that you are not around to notice the fact. Subjectively, Max only perceives the universe in which he still lives.

The universe is just this experiment writ large. Every event that could possibly kill you is a result of quantum interactions which divide the universe into worlds in which you are alive and worlds in which you are dead. Subjectively, you will only experience those universes where you continue to live. Subjectively, you will never die. You have “quantum immortality.”

jamesieee
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Re: Operation: Enduring Yale 250s

Postby jamesieee » Fri Apr 16, 2010 8:54 pm

Here's mine. Hope it helps a soul or two. I applied in early January and was accepted in mid-March.

---
A blank page is infinitely potent. It can touch millions, change the world, proclaim new truths. Its promise is as heart-pounding as it is paralyzing: as a writer, I will inevitably fail to realize its ultimate potential. For every word I write, there must be a better word; for every thought, a better thought. Facing certain mediocrity, I cannot help but want to simply leave the blankness be, with its could-be greatness intact.

But a blank page is not itself greatness. It is only a canvas for it, and if left blank, the antithesis to it. However inadequate, I must write if I hope to touch even one person, change one thing, make one statement. The first sentence is undoubtedly agonizing. It feels as though I am throwing away an infinity of exciting possibilities for one narrow path to the finish. But the second sentence, it turns out, is just as agonizing. I have indeed lost possibilities I had one sentence ago, but I have come upon just as many new ones that I could not have seen then. That agony is liberating: at every juncture, I have choice. With every sentence, I can strive anew for could-be greatness. The struggle is not over until the last period falls.

Ultimately, my initial paralysis seems silly. Words will not be judged by how much they fell short of hypothetical perfection but how much they rose above nothing. Looking back, I can only be so fortunate as to see that mine have.

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crackberry
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Re: Operation: Enduring Yale 250s

Postby crackberry » Fri Apr 23, 2010 8:09 pm

Despite the fact that I feel weird posting this because I was WLed and not admitted, I'm going to do so anyway because it got some positive reaction from TLSers, as well as friends/family. I do not have Yale numbers, but I did get the WL, so perhaps Yale liked it as well:

crackberry's 250 wrote:One thousand miles east of India, a group of Paleolithic people — believed to be the last such humans on Earth — lives in seclusion on North Sentinel Island, an isolated outlier 30 miles from the Andaman archipelago. The Sentinelese, as these remote people are called, have retained their identity and avoided the encroaching reach of civilization by aggressively resisting contact with the outside world.

So successful have they been in isolating themselves from modernity that we likely know less about the Sentinelese than any other people in the world today. They have survived by assuming a violent distrust for outsiders and greeting unwelcome visitors with a barrage of arrows. The Sentinelese are hunter-gatherers with no apparent knowledge of agriculture and whose language is unknown. They have the ability to retain — though not to create — fire.

If the isolated tribe were to die off (despite policies and regulations that exist to protect it), the tangible effect on the global community would be negligible. The Sentinelese have no impact on the economic or political fabric of the modern world; indeed, they are hardly even a part of it, but that is precisely why their extinction would be so tragic. The Sentinelese are the last remnants of a prelapsarian age in history, and while their future is uncertain, their island remains a time capsule unlike any other on the planet. In its singularity, the isolated tribe is significant in the modern world simply because it exists. We must try to keep it that way.

Kretzy
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Re: Operation: Enduring Yale 250s

Postby Kretzy » Sat Apr 24, 2010 5:25 pm

This is a fantastic thread idea.

FWIW, I was waitlisted, and applied on 2/15. I don't love my 250, but here it is:

I love zombie films. The gore and suspense is petrifying, the characters always fatally flawed. Some who have every possible advantage find ways to die gruesome deaths at the hands of the undead. For most, the idea of being devoured alive is what makes zombie films scary.

For me, zombie films transcend scary. I am not worried about the slow, lumbering undead; I am terrified by those still living. Far from just irrational, the remainder of humanity is unnaturally aggressive, paranoid, and individualistic to a fault. Many actively undermine other survivors. Victory fades to bloodbath, the survivors eaten by the lumbering horde or brutally murdered by other survivors.

My zombie-related fears transcend cinema into my political life.

My zombies are the antigay right, my fellow survivors so-called gay rights activists who care more about finding the spotlight than helping their fellow queer citizens. While James Dobson scares me, with pervasive and apparently persuasive hate, it is the infighting of my fellow gay rights activists that impedes the survival of our ideas and our movement.

Leaders of national organizations hobnob in Washington, giving cover to political inaction. Meanwhile, gays are denied housing, employment, and hundreds of rights. They applaud rhetoric rather than pressuring for action. To enrich their own coffers, they sell out members of the queer community who desperately need an advocate.

Too many gay leaders care more about photos than policy. Their inaction undermines the movement’s progress. They are complicit as the rightwing picks off queers without a voice.

legalized
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Re: Operation: Enduring Yale 250s

Postby legalized » Wed Apr 28, 2010 11:38 pm

zabagabe wrote:
iminlstrick wrote:Hrmmm, I absolutely loved almost all of the 250, but my only concern is that when I first read your breakdown of "skin color" into white, black, brown, yellow -- the "yellow" glaringly stood out because it (I think?) has a pretty strong history of being used in a very very derogatory fashion against Asians. Obviously "black" has history too, and perhaps brown to some extent, but when I read "yellow" in reference to face, I had pause and think twice about your word choice. To someone who really takes that categorization offensively (and you have no idea who your readers are), the whole essay kind of becomes ironic, even if well-intended.

I wouldn't have posted that publicly, and I absolutely DO NOT want a debate on race in what is a great thread idea, but I chose to respond because I just wanted to demonstrate how a seemingly innocuous "categorization" can actually be offensive. Kudos to you for writing on race; I doubt most applicants would be so ballsy for their 250.


Without agreeing or disagreeing with your thoughts, I think it's hard enough for people to open up and share their 250s as it is - if they're expecting critiques/criticism (which at this point can't even be construed as helpful, since it's all over now), I think people might shy away from sharing...if necessary, maybe send thoughts via PM?


For the record, a Chinese man from China who was in discussion with me about an Atlanta article saying they had to change the name of the Yellow train line to Gold because it runs into Atlanta's Chinatown and the Asians were complaining, said that that had to be AMERICAN Chinese complaining, not real Chinese, because Chinese people are not politically correct at all and don't care about that crap.

For what it's worth.

But. Point taken. Maybe there was an American Asian (Chinese or otherwise) on the adcomm and that's what got him dinged.

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dutchstriker
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Re: Operation: Enduring Yale 250s

Postby dutchstriker » Thu May 20, 2010 11:03 am

I was accepted off the waitlist. I really don't know how much my 250 helped or hurt me.

-----
Alasdair MacIntyre, in Dependent Rational Animals, recognizes that humans are vulnerable creatures, dependent on others and formal institutions for protection. While acutely aware that any moral theory must account for this, MacIntyre’s own theory fails to do so.

His is a vision of small communities, each with its own teleology, history, and tradition, comprising the political structure in which virtues are developed and pursued. However, the practices toward which some virtues may be directed could themselves be based on exploiting vulnerabilities (e.g. the institution of slavery). Such practices can be coherently integrated into a tradition such that the community faces no resulting insoluble epistemological crises, thereby, according to MacIntyre himself, rendering any external critiques of the prevailing order futile.

MacIntyre’s desire to protect the vulnerable does not lead him to favor a political system incorporating natural human rights. Instead, he rejects the notion as a fiction on par with “belief in witches and unicorns.” For a moral concept to be meaningful, according to MacIntyre, it must be embedded within a context that confers intelligibility upon it. But the concept of human rights is in fact infused throughout the structure of modern liberal-democratic societies, such that the concept is not only intelligible, it grounds the intelligibility of much else. Furthermore, the concept of human rights functions to prevent the very object of MacIntyre’s concern: the exploitation of the vulnerable,
which in reality is every one of us.

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exdubliner
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Re: Operation: Enduring Yale 250s

Postby exdubliner » Wed Jun 09, 2010 5:25 am

I went for an obvious metaphor, hoping it would resonate with adcomms:

The day was hot.

Far above, a fiery ball of angry red broadcast shimmering waves of punishment to those who dwelt below. From such a lofty perch all judgments rendered were fair and impartial; any who entered its domain were equally subjected to its wrath.

Oblivious to such earthly distractions, the boy knelt in the sand. In his hands, long-forgotten worlds rose to new life. An epic battle raged between impossibly colossal beings. Today, in a backyard in Charlottesville, Virginia, plastic dinosaurs recreated in miniature a scene from eons past.

After a titanic struggle, the tyrannosaurus emerged victorious. Once again it had discovered the inevitable chink in the triceratops’ impregnable armor. The match decided, the boy carelessly tossed the two deadly opponents to the ground. Blinking away tears of perspiration, he turned to go indoors. As he did though, something caught his eye.

It was the Sun. Set like a jewel in the crystal blue sky, it beckoned to him. His attention thus ensnared, the boy evenly returned its glare. He paused then and calmly measured the distance between them. The thing seemed so tantalizingly close. Spotting a nearby hill, he began his ascent.

Climbing over the top, he reached out to claim his rightful prize. Inexplicably, it remained just out of grasp. If only there were a way to stretch just a little further. Without knowing, the boy began to bend his knees. Flexing his calves, he tensed.

Suddenly, for the first time in his life, the boy jumped.


...and missed. Which is fine, because the boy landed in Cambridge :)

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dbt
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Re: Operation: Enduring Yale 250s

Postby dbt » Tue Jul 20, 2010 12:21 am

My 250 - admit:

Often law is the embodiment of moral judgments. Yet members of the legal community understand that persuasion drives law, and that such persuasion may incorporate normative arguments: the world is X, but it should be Y. What power members of the legal community possess! How can I be sure that the position for which I advocate, the position which may upset the moral status quo, is the right position? How can I know that the world really should be Y?

Plato posited the existence of two worlds. The eternal contains the unchanging Forms, and the sensible contains the particulars that mimic the Forms. The various Forms include not only physical objects like the Chair, but also ethical concepts such as Justice and the Good. It is through interaction with the sensible world that we come to better understand the everlasting Forms. Perception, argumentation, and judgment lead us to realize ethical concepts.

But the forms remain intricately connected. To fully understand one requires understanding them all. None short of the omniscient is capable of such a feat. So, while we can seek a greater understanding of ethical concepts, there is room for relativistic reasoning. The world may reject torture with near unanimity, yet other ethical differences remain.

Should the world be Y? I would like to say that I don't know. But I do know that I can count on legal actors to do their part in advocating their positions, and that humanity will continue to seek out the truth.

chopsticks3092
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Re: Operation: Enduring Yale 250s

Postby chopsticks3092 » Fri Jul 23, 2010 2:29 pm

After weeks of having no idea whatsoever what I was going to do with the 250, came up with this one. Admitted.

Economics is a science without values. Gini coefficients may indicate the level of income inequality in a society, but economic theory remains silent on whether inequality is good or bad. Does government spending crowd in or crowd out private investment? Go to the data, economists say. But the sign on the relevant correlation or regression coefficient neither constitutes nor implies a value judgment. For government spending may be good (or bad) for growth, but economists will also tell you that growth can be too fast (or too slow). With no direct answers, economics is indeed a "dismal science."

Philosophy, by contrast, is home to values. Ethics, after all, deals exclusively with morality and value theory. In philosophy, knowledge is implicitly good, justification desirable, rationality venerated and logical soundness commendable. Values abound everywhere—except, perhaps, in that most abstract of branches, metaphysics.

It is only when economics and philosophy come together that things become really interesting. Economics can inform philosophy: who can deny that there is a touch of efficiency to utilitarianism, or that there is something inherently economic about Dworkin’s equality of resources? Philosophy can also breathe life into economics. Rawlsian and libertarian accounts of justice produce fascinating results in models of effort, bequests and welfare. And armed with a theory of fairness, designing an equitable tax code becomes possible.

Upon learning of my double major in economics and philosophy, most people remark that it is an unusual combination. I, however, prefer to think of it as a perfect match.

advocate101
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Re: Operation: Enduring Yale 250s

Postby advocate101 » Wed Nov 10, 2010 1:08 pm

From the link, http://blogs.law.yale.edu/blogs/admissi ... tross.aspx it's clear one should not write above the 250 word count for their essay. However, am wondering if anyone has EVER been admitted with having written 251 or 252 essay? Thanks in advance.

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jtemp320
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Re: Operation: Enduring Yale 250s

Postby jtemp320 » Wed May 11, 2011 7:20 pm

Not admitted but I spent a lot of time on this so I thought I'd share in case it inspires anyone (with better #s) to write something that actually does get them in :D

250

Most of us rarely pause to appreciate the importance of the seventh cranial nerve, but it is critical for chewing, blinking, smiling, and frowning. When it fails, in a condition known as idiopathic facial paralysis, or Bell’s palsy, the landscape of the face is remapped - half of it frozen and unblinking.

An attack of Bell’s palsy is a sudden and often mysterious occurrence. No cause is readily apparent. Most patients recover within one year, but some are affected for the rest of their lives. Bell’s palsy sufferers, whose smiles become characteristic snarls, can feel self-conscious, isolated, even cursed.

Or at least that was the way I felt the day I awoke – having just graduated college and three thousand miles from home - to find my face distorted with no guarantee that it would return to normal. Within weeks Lyme disease was diagnosed as the cause of my Bell’s palsy and within months I recovered fully. During that time, despite my condition, I made lasting friendships, learned a great deal at my first job after college, and was stunned to find myself happier then I had been in years.

Far from a curse, these are the gifts that I believe Bell’s palsy granted me: a greater ability to see beyond the superficial, to accept and overcome challenging circumstances, and a realization that true satisfaction is internally generated. This is a perspective I am especially grateful for as I prepare to enter law school.

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memphisbelle
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Re: Operation: Enduring Yale 250s

Postby memphisbelle » Wed May 11, 2011 8:31 pm

Some of these are really beautiful...I hope that this thread continues. I'm planning to write one soon. Thank you for sharing. :D

thederangedwang
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Re: Operation: Enduring Yale 250s

Postby thederangedwang » Mon Jul 18, 2011 10:40 am

Please follow this format while giving your 250 word Essays

GPA:
LSAT:
Yale Decision (Admit, Deny, Waitlist)

The reason is there are a lot of essays here yet no context to put them in. I'm sure some of these essays are superb yet the applicants were ultimately rejected due to low scores, however, by not listing the scores, some readers may believe the actual essay was bad.

So please list your stats so we can fully appreciate your essays

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fingerscrossedxx
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Re: Operation: Enduring Yale 250s

Postby fingerscrossedxx » Fri Oct 21, 2011 5:01 pm

...
Last edited by fingerscrossedxx on Mon Nov 14, 2011 6:30 pm, edited 1 time in total.

TheFriendlyBarber
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Re: Operation: Enduring Yale 250s

Postby TheFriendlyBarber » Fri Oct 21, 2011 5:08 pm

advocate101 wrote:From the link, http://blogs.law.yale.edu/blogs/admissi ... tross.aspx it's clear one should not write above the 250 word count for their essay. However, am wondering if anyone has EVER been admitted with having written 251 or 252 essay? Thanks in advance.


Yes. 255. But I wouldn't push my luck if I were you.

melsaye
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Re: Operation: Enduring Yale 250s

Postby melsaye » Sun Oct 23, 2011 12:38 pm

Didn't post in the right spot. This thread is for applied students.
Last edited by melsaye on Sun Oct 23, 2011 1:11 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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kwais
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Re: Operation: Enduring Yale 250s

Postby kwais » Sun Oct 23, 2011 12:43 pm

melsaye wrote:Here is my 250 Yale, any opinions are much appreciated.

As I gave into temptation and bit into the juicy red apple, I thought of Yves. I’ve always had a weakness for apples and pretty eyes. Succumbing to Yves’ batting eyelashes was hardly an ethical dilemma. At worst it resulted in a quarrel that would serve as impetus to further impassioned dialectical pleasures.
Choosing to bite into a Red Delicious on the other hand, was a struggle of principles. Crunching away, I wondered if this was a Chilean, American, or Canadian Apple. The link between my personal tastes and the livelihoods of apple farmers was a thread in tension. Marx and Ricardo tore at the fabric of my conscience. Thoughts of comparative advantage, alienated labour, agricultural subsidies, product dumping, and WTO tribunals infested my mind. I tried to converge rationality and ethics by seeking refuge in the laws of supply and demand. My youthful atomistic morality had been replaced with a sophisticated ethic rooted in the economics of human relations and empathy. Justice was no longer just a Socratic abstraction, it was a measurable phenomenon. I hadn’t fallen from grace; I was merely plugging into humanity.
My coalescence with Yves was an exchange that affected only the both of us; it was not original sin. My biting into the apple was a pull at the continuum of the organic; it was an action with consequences for people I’d never met. It was a choice that demanded an awareness of the world outside of the untenable seclusion of Eden.


come on man, don't waste such precious space with a thesaurus exercise. say something!

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thelawschoolproject
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Re: Operation: Enduring Yale 250s

Postby thelawschoolproject » Sun Oct 23, 2011 12:43 pm

exdubliner wrote:I went for an obvious metaphor, hoping it would resonate with adcomms:



...and missed. Which is fine, because the boy landed in Cambridge :)



This made me feel better about life.

yoiav
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Re: Operation: Enduring Yale 250s

Postby yoiav » Sun Oct 30, 2011 12:28 pm

kwais wrote:
melsaye wrote:Here is my 250 Yale, any opinions are much appreciated.

As I gave into temptation and bit into the juicy red apple, I thought of Yves. I’ve always had a weakness for apples and pretty eyes. Succumbing to Yves’ batting eyelashes was hardly an ethical dilemma. At worst it resulted in a quarrel that would serve as impetus to further impassioned dialectical pleasures.
Choosing to bite into a Red Delicious on the other hand, was a struggle of principles. Crunching away, I wondered if this was a Chilean, American, or Canadian Apple. The link between my personal tastes and the livelihoods of apple farmers was a thread in tension. Marx and Ricardo tore at the fabric of my conscience. Thoughts of comparative advantage, alienated labour, agricultural subsidies, product dumping, and WTO tribunals infested my mind. I tried to converge rationality and ethics by seeking refuge in the laws of supply and demand. My youthful atomistic morality had been replaced with a sophisticated ethic rooted in the economics of human relations and empathy. Justice was no longer just a Socratic abstraction, it was a measurable phenomenon. I hadn’t fallen from grace; I was merely plugging into humanity.
My coalescence with Yves was an exchange that affected only the both of us; it was not original sin. My biting into the apple was a pull at the continuum of the organic; it was an action with consequences for people I’d never met. It was a choice that demanded an awareness of the world outside of the untenable seclusion of Eden.




come on man, don't waste such precious space with a thesaurus exercise. say something!


+1




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