(Hopefully) Final PS - Mind Giving it One Last Look?

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SNightHighlights

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(Hopefully) Final PS - Mind Giving it One Last Look?

Postby SNightHighlights » Wed Nov 02, 2016 8:45 pm

What was supposed to be a relaxing Saturday filled with video games on my Xbox became one of the most influential experiences of my life. My father woke me up at 6 a.m. and told me to find a tough pair of jeans, and meet him outside in half an hour. We spent that entire day cutting down dead trees for use as firewood. By dusk, my gloves had become a tattered mess. I was shell-shocked and angry at my father. We did not have a fireplace or intend to sell this freshly cut wood, so why had he taken my time from me and made me hurt? But at that moment, in the light of the bonfire created from felled limbs and brush grass, I felt an unexpected sense of satisfaction. I was witnessing the direct product of my hard work. My father sat next to me by the fire. With a firm voice he said, “Tyler, you are my only shot at leaving something good in this world. I know that you will do great things someday and help a lot of people. Work towards that by making yourself a better person every day - never be comfortable.”

Fast-forward to my college years. After a year and a half at a small regional State University, I transferred to a school with one of the lowest rates of grade inflation in the country. I learned what it meant to feel insignificant in a very large and unfamiliar environment. This was my first direct experience with learning how to not only survive, but to thrive in a competitive academic culture. Before I transferred, A’s had been easy enough to earn. If the work was finished and the directions followed, an A was all but guaranteed. But in my new environment, hard work was not enough. The expectation was that the work would not only be finished, but would be of the highest quality. At Purdue, an A truly represented exceptional work.

I had left behind comfort for an opportunity to prove that I belonged at an elite university. I was entirely alone on a huge, foreign campus. If I was going to succeed, I needed to learn not only how to work hard, but to work smart. Hours that might previously have been spent reading entire chapters of my textbook became a careful analysis of the patterns and tendencies that professors expended creating their exams. I became a frequent visitor in the offices of my Teaching Assistants. I quickly learned that they would be vital to my success. If there was a difficult assignment due, I was in their office with a list of questions, and I absolutely had a copy for them to proofread. The world of academia is incredibly collaborative. A professor knowing your name and face can be the difference between earning an A- or a B+. I have always taken my studies seriously, but it was during this first semester after transferring that I learned what it meant to be truly invested in my education. Just like that Saturday spent chopping down trees, my hard work yielded hard-earned rewards. I am certain that the semester of Spring 2016 will remain the single most challenging period of study in my undergraduate education. Transferring to a new school in the middle of winter was hard. It was not comfortable - but I knew that I belonged. The challenges of a legal education will follow the conclusion of my undergraduate studies. Law school was a part of my plan before I began college, and for me, there is no better career than that of a Lawyer.

My interest in the law started at a young age. I am an only child and being raised without brothers or sisters is an experience that has prepared me to be a mediator. I often found myself settling disputes in the household. If finances were tight or my parents were making an important decision, I was included without exception as the rational and neutral third party. There is a certain satisfaction involved with the resolution of a dispute. To me, there is something special about being able to negotiate so effectively that an opposing party that was once so staunchly opposed to one’s views yields and compromises. It might not be comfortable, there might be raised voices and unpleasant words, but cogent, compelling, and well-defended arguments always have the potential to prevail. When I grew old enough to think seriously about what I wanted to do with the rest of my life, a career in the law was a natural fit. My undergraduate studies in Corporate Communications kept that fit in mind, providing me with a solid foundation of demonstrable skills that are well-suited for real world legal applications. I have studied a wide range of curriculum that has improved my ability to think critically, use effective rhetoric, articulate, and research. Law is the best avenue for me to utilize my skillset in a field that allows me to see my efforts have a direct and positive impact.

From my perspective, the world exists in two primary states: the way that it should be and the way that it is. We should certainly strive to create the ideal world that we envision, but I believe that effective change is most meaningful when it occurs within the systems we have designed. I realize that as a lawyer I will most likely never be a savior of the disadvantaged and downtrodden, but I know that a law degree will give me an avenue to create meaningful change – even if it is in the form of a single brief that sets positive precedent. I would rather make tangible “real world” contributions than be an imaginary maverick.

Law school is arguably the largest single commitment of time, money, and mental energy that I will make in my lifetime. I have dedicated a great deal of thought toward evaluating whether a legal education is the right decision. I have considered if law truly is the best way to utilize my aptitudes, pursue my interests, and accomplish my goals, while maintaining an emphasis on self-improvement. I generally believe that multidimensional questions merit complex answers, but my answer to “why law” is simple. A legal career will not be easy. It will not be straightforward, and it certainly will not be comfortable – but there are no career paths that fit me as intrinsically as one in the law. Whether I work for the U. S. Attorney’s Office or the Judge Advocate Corps, a Vault 100 firm or a small private practice, I know that my education and experiences have provided me with an excellent foundation from which I can learn to effectively face the challenges of a demanding legal career. Being an attorney provides me with everything that I need in a career. A career in the law just feels right, and I know that it will provide me with an excellent avenue to ensure that I have opportunities to make a positive impact, face challenges that lead to personal growth, and of course, never be comfortable.

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OhMyLaw

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Re: (Hopefully) Final PS - Mind Giving it One Last Look?

Postby OhMyLaw » Wed Nov 02, 2016 9:34 pm

SNightHighlights wrote:What was supposed to be a relaxing Saturday filled with video games on my Xbox became one of the most influential experiences of my life. My father woke me up at 6 a.m. and told me to find a tough pair of jeans, and meet him outside in half an hour. We spent that entire day cutting down dead trees for use as firewood. By dusk, my gloves had become a tattered mess. I was shell-shocked and angry at my father. We did not have a fireplace or intend to sell this freshly cut wood, so why had he taken my time from me and made me hurt? But at that moment, in the light of the bonfire created from felled limbs and brush grass, I felt an unexpected sense of satisfaction. I was witnessing the direct product of my hard work. My father sat next to me by the fire. With a firm voice he said, “Tyler, you are my only shot at leaving something good in this world. I know that you will do great things someday and help a lot of people. Work towards that by making yourself a better person every day - never be comfortable.”

Fast-forward to my college years. After a year and a half at a small regional State University, I transferred to a school with one of the lowest rates of grade inflation in the country. I learned what it meant to feel insignificant in a very large and unfamiliar environment. This was my first direct experience with learning how to not only survive, but to thrive in a competitive academic culture. Before I transferred, A’s had been easy enough to earn. If the work was finished and the directions followed, an A was all but guaranteed. But in my new environment, hard work was not enough. The expectation was that the work would not only be finished, but would be of the highest quality. At Purdue, an A truly represented exceptional work.

I had left behind comfort for an opportunity to prove that I belonged at an elite university. I was entirely alone on a huge, foreign campus. If I was going to succeed, I needed to learn not only how to work hard, but to work smart. Hours that might previously have been spent reading entire chapters of my textbook became a careful analysis of the patterns and tendencies that professors expended creating their exams. I became a frequent visitor in the offices of my Teaching Assistants. I quickly learned that they would be vital to my success. If there was a difficult assignment due, I was in their office with a list of questions, and I absolutely had a copy for them to proofread. The world of academia is incredibly collaborative. A professor knowing your name and face can be the difference between earning an A- or a B+. I have always taken my studies seriously, but it was during this first semester after transferring that I learned what it meant to be truly invested in my education. Just like that Saturday spent chopping down trees, my hard work yielded hard-earned rewards. I am certain that the semester of Spring 2016 will remain the single most challenging period of study in my undergraduate education. Transferring to a new school in the middle of winter was hard. It was not comfortable - but I knew that I belonged. The challenges of a legal education will follow the conclusion of my undergraduate studies. Law school was a part of my plan before I began college, and for me, there is no better career than that of a Lawyer.

My interest in the law started at a young age. I am an only child and being raised without brothers or sisters is an experience that has prepared me to be a mediator. I often found myself settling disputes in the household. If finances were tight or my parents were making an important decision, I was included without exception as the rational and neutral third party. There is a certain satisfaction involved with the resolution of a dispute. To me, there is something special about being able to negotiate so effectively that an opposing party that was once so staunchly opposed to one’s views yields and compromises. It might not be comfortable, there might be raised voices and unpleasant words, but cogent, compelling, and well-defended arguments always have the potential to prevail. When I grew old enough to think seriously about what I wanted to do with the rest of my life, a career in the law was a natural fit. My undergraduate studies in Corporate Communications kept that fit in mind, providing me with a solid foundation of demonstrable skills that are well-suited for real world legal applications. I have studied a wide range of curriculum that has improved my ability to think critically, use effective rhetoric, articulate, and research. Law is the best avenue for me to utilize my skillset in a field that allows me to see my efforts have a direct and positive impact.

From my perspective, the world exists in two primary states: the way that it should be and the way that it is. We should certainly strive to create the ideal world that we envision, but I believe that effective change is most meaningful when it occurs within the systems we have designed. I realize that as a lawyer I will most likely never be a savior of the disadvantaged and downtrodden, but I know that a law degree will give me an avenue to create meaningful change – even if it is in the form of a single brief that sets positive precedent. I would rather make tangible “real world” contributions than be an imaginary maverick.

Law school is arguably the largest single commitment of time, money, and mental energy that I will make in my lifetime. I have dedicated a great deal of thought toward evaluating whether a legal education is the right decision. I have considered if law truly is the best way to utilize my aptitudes, pursue my interests, and accomplish my goals, while maintaining an emphasis on self-improvement. I generally believe that multidimensional questions merit complex answers, but my answer to “why law” is simple. A legal career will not be easy. It will not be straightforward, and it certainly will not be comfortable – but there are no career paths that fit me as intrinsically as one in the law. Whether I work for the U. S. Attorney’s Office or the Judge Advocate Corps, a Vault 100 firm or a small private practice, I know that my education and experiences have provided me with an excellent foundation from which I can learn to effectively face the challenges of a demanding legal career. Being an attorney provides me with everything that I need in a career. A career in the law just feels right, and I know that it will provide me with an excellent avenue to ensure that I have opportunities to make a positive impact, face challenges that lead to personal growth, and of course, never be comfortable.


First things first, is this going to fit into 2-3 pages double spaced? This is the standard for most ls apps that I've seen.

Additionally, you're a good writer. My biggest concern though is that you try to fit too many things in. In a PS, you want a clear, memorable story that the admissions person will remember. And even after reading all of that, I'm not sure if there's something that really stands out to me. Hope this helps.

SNightHighlights

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Re: (Hopefully) Final PS - Mind Giving it One Last Look?

Postby SNightHighlights » Wed Nov 02, 2016 9:41 pm

*Double Post Deleted*
Last edited by SNightHighlights on Wed Nov 02, 2016 9:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.

SNightHighlights

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Posts: 81
Joined: Fri Oct 14, 2016 1:06 pm

Re: (Hopefully) Final PS - Mind Giving it One Last Look?

Postby SNightHighlights » Wed Nov 02, 2016 9:42 pm

Yeah it does fit on three pages. I also have a different version for schools that specify two pages. I wanted to keep a consistent theme of "never being comfortable" and then utilize numerous examples I've experienced (The woodcutting, the college transfer, childhood, etc.) so I know it could be a little bit busy. What I tried to do was transition from a story about challenges to discussing why I wanted to have a legal career. The goal was to really just express "me". I get what you're saying though, perhaps I could do a better job of making that theme explicit throughout the statement? This is also the long draft, so I can certainly "trim the fat" if you will.



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