PS: Draft One

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Anonymous User
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PS: Draft One

Postby Anonymous User » Sat Oct 19, 2013 11:48 am

Notes: This felt sincere as I wrote it. I often have difficulty writing much about myself but I think this was the right step in regards to the PS. I wonder if it's TOO honest in that my self-confidence at work just looks like utter shit prior to the discussed job. Even so, it was also honest to write that it's way, way better than it used to be.

________________________

I hear from many of my peers and elders alike that substitute teaching is an ideal job for those that are meandering between different career possibilities. Another way to put it: it's an appropriate position for the modern college graduate that is not quite sure what they want to do with their life. While I find truth in these statements, I have also found that substitute teaching has not only afforded me time to seek a suitable career, but it has also given me the confidence that I need in order to find a career at all.


Consider the night before my first day of substitute teaching. Having interviewed a couple weeks prior for the position, I anticipated that I would be debuting as a substitute fairly soon. However, the anxiety did not become 'real' until I received a call that night to come in the following day. My assignment? A 6th grade history class. Rolling and turning in bed, I was anxious for a couple reasons. The big one was that I had never before stepped into a position where I would be expected to lead a classroom, forget a classroom full of impressionable youngsters. Additionally, to conduct order in a classroom and to be the central figure would be something seemingly foreign to my introverted by nature personality. In school, I was always the one to sit in the back, out of the spotlight and out of the gaze of the rest of the classroom. I never saw this so much as a personality flaw, though - after all, it did not preclude me from offering my perspectives and participating in the college classroom. In any case, before I debuted the following day, I really thought to myself why I had signed up for this in the first place if I figured it was so antithetical to my personality. Of course, by the end of the next day, I realized that this was simply part of the maturation process. There are very few occupations, if any, where one is not required to step out of their comfort zone. If I couldn't do this, then how could I establish a successful career in the future?


Zip to the next day. I dress well and play the part of teacher, but let's see if I can execute it. I step into the classroom, feeling like I'm a kid again and it's my first day of school. Yes, this may sound cheesy, but it's the most accurate way I can describe how I was feeling that day. Sure, I wasn't going to make the administration call my mother so she could come pick me up, but even still, I had no idea how the day was going to go. That said, I read the plans as set out by the teacher I was filling in for, and got to work. I put the notes for the assignment on the board - it was regarding the Ancient Greeks. Great, I thought – topics I learned some about in college studying the Ancient Greek philosophers. Then, to each class, I had to hand out their assignment and guide them through it, offering suggestions to improve their answers and to otherwise help them in any way. Suddenly, all that anxiety was gone, and I started to feel like a professional, somebody who was ready to step out into the world and no longer meander like so many of us twenty-somethings understandably do. For an example, one question asked about Socrates and his contribution to Athens. Some students needed assistance with this one, and not only, to my surprise, was I able to articulate what I know about Socrates in a way comprehensible to a 6th grader, but the students found what I had to say interesting and they wanted to know more. To make such a sophisticated figure like Socrates, who is often not discussed in much detail until college, accessible to a 6th grader is something I found intrinsically rewarding.

Throughout much of my life, I've been told to strive for a career of solitude behind a computer desk. “You should become a writer.” “Why not major in computer science?” And true, these are careers that, with enough work, I think I could make a living in. But even so, given that I'm now comfortable with stepping in front of a classroom, I know I have a lot more options in front of me. Take an example. Before I started substitute teaching, I could hardly imagine myself as a trial lawyer. Having to communicate ideas in front of a judge? Having to keep regular contact with a client who, for instance, is significantly dependent on me to avoid criminal prosecution? And yet, given the confidence and public speaking ability that I've acquired in the classroom, I'm assured that I could handle such a career, and possibly even excel in it.


Yes, it is true that substitute teaching is an excellent option for those who are unsure of what they would like to do with their life, as it is not binding. Further, it also helps one to explore directly the career path of teaching. But even more than that, and most importantly for me, it is something that has transformed me from one that is hesitant to commit to a career to one that is welcoming of it. To one that embraces commitment and is looking forward to becoming a full-fledged professional. In summation, while I already had the analytical skills necessary to succeeding in law from studying [x], I now have the poise to plow ahead and use them in whatever setting I find most appropriate in law school and beyond.

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malleus discentium
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Re: PS: Draft One

Postby malleus discentium » Sat Oct 19, 2013 8:28 pm

Some textual notes:
I hear frommany of my peers and elders alike that substitute teaching is an ideal job for those thatwho are meandering between different career possibilities. Another way to put it:I would say "More cynically," because that's essentially what it is, and it makes clearer what the "truth" in the next sentence is it's an appropriate position for the modern college graduate thatwho is not quite sure what they want to do with their life. While I find truth in these statements, I have also found that substitute teaching has not only afforded me time to seek a suitable career, but it has also given me the confidence that I need in orderto find a career at all.

Consider the night before my first day of substitute teaching. Having interviewed a couple few weeks prior for the position, I anticipated that I would be debuting as a substitute fairly soon.However, But the anxiety did not become 'real' until I received a call that night to come in the following day. My assignment? A 6th grade history class. Rolling and turning in bed, I was anxious for a couple several/many reasons. The big one was that I had never before stepped into a position where I would be expected to lead a classroom,You never led group discussion in college? forget much less a classroom full of impressionable youngsters. Additionally, to conduct keep order in a classroom and to be the central figure would be something seemingly foreign to my introverted by nature personalitynature. In school, I was always the one to sit in the back, out of the spotlight and out of the gaze of the rest of the classroom. I never saw this so muchas a personality flaw, though - after all, it did not preclude me from offering my perspectives and participating in the college classroom. This does not agree with sitting "out of the gaze of the rest of the classroom" in my book.

In any case,before I debuted Don't use this word twice. the following day, I really thought to asked myself why I had signed up for this in the first place if I figured it was so antithetical to my personality. Of course, bBut by the end of the next day, I realized that this was simply it was going to be an essential part of the maturation process my maturation. There are very few occupations, if any, where one is not required to step out of their Don't use both "one" and "their" comfort zone. If I couldn't do this, then how could I establish a successful career in the future?


Zip to the next day. I dress well and play the part of teacher, but let's see if I can execute it. This is very informal. If that's what you're going for then okay, but I would change it. I step into the classroom, feeling like I'm a kid again and it's my first day of school. Yes, this may sound cheesy, but it's the most accurate way I can describe how I was feeling that day. No. Sure, I wasn't going to make the administration call my mother so she could come pick me up, but even still, I had no idea how the day was going to go. Eh. That said, I read the plans as set out by the teacher I was filling in for, and got to work. I put the notes for the assignment on the board- it was regardingthe Ancient Greeks. Great, I thought – topics I learned some about in college studying the Ancient Greek philosophers. Then, to each class, I had to hand out their assignment and guide them through it, offering suggestions to improve their answers and to otherwise help them in any way. Unnecessary detail. Suddenly, Was it actually sudden? Or was it progressive? Either way, explain here why and how it changed. The anecdote below is strong, but explain why it's something that effected the general change in your attitude that day. all that anxiety was gone, and I started to feel like a professional, somebody who was ready to step out into the world and no longer meander like so many of us twenty-somethings understandably do. For an example, one question student asked about Socrates and his contribution to Athens. Some students needed assistance with this one, and not only, to my surprise, was I able to articulate what I know about Socrates in a way comprehensible to a 6th grader, but the students found what I had to say interesting and they wanted to know more. To make such a sophisticated Har har. figure like Socrates, who is often not discussed in much detail until college, accessible to a 6th grader is something I found intrinsically rewarding.

Throughout much of my life, I've been told to strive for a career of solitude behind a computer desk. “You should become a writer.” “Why not major in computer science?” And true, these are careers that could provide for me a living, with enough work, I think I could make a living in. But even so, given that I'm now comfortable with stepping in front of a classroom, Retool this a bit to emphasize that the substitute teaching experience taught you a lot about you and your abilities in general, not just that you can "step in front of a classroom."
I know I have a lot more options in front of me. Take an example. Before I started substitute teaching, I could hardly imagine myself as a trial lawyer. Having to communicate ideas in front of a judge? Having to keep regular contact with a client who, for instance, is significantly dependent on me to avoid criminal prosecution? And yet, given the confidence and public speaking ability that I've acquired You didn't acquire it there--you just realized you had it in the classroom, I'm assured that I could handle such a career, and possibly even excel in it.

Yes, it is true that sSubstitute teaching is an excellent option for those who are unsure of what they would like to do with their life, as it is not binding. Further, it also helps one to explore directly the career path of teaching. But even more than that, and most importantly for me, it is something that has transformed me from someone that is hesitant to commit to a career to someone that is who welcomings of it. To someone that who embraces commitment and is looking forward to becoming a full-fledged professional. In summation, wWhile I already had the analytical skills necessary to succeeding in law from studying [x], I now have the poise to plow ahead and use them in whatever setting I find most appropriate in law school and beyond. This is a strong conclusion but I'd incorporate it a bit more seamlessly.

Some content thoughts:
*As I noted, this strikes me as overfamiliar (in particular the frequent direct addresses). If that's the tone you're looking for then okay, but I caution against it.
*The part about feeling first-day nerves is fine, but I would change the two sentences I noted. Just focus on the fact that you were nervous.
Last edited by malleus discentium on Sun Oct 20, 2013 2:37 am, edited 1 time in total.

Anonymous User
Posts: 273424
Joined: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:32 am

Re: PS: Draft One

Postby Anonymous User » Sat Oct 19, 2013 9:27 pm

Thank you so much for doing this. It's a big help.




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