Grammar Question

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Anonymous User
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Grammar Question

Postby Anonymous User » Thu Oct 18, 2012 2:40 pm

Which sentence is grammatically correct (not awkward), A or B?

A) Oftentimes a question can have added significance depending on who asks it.

B) Oftentimes, depending on who asks it, a question can have added significance.


*Also, if both sentences sound awkward and you feel there is a better way of saying it, by all means please comment!

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Bronte
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Re: Grammar Question

Postby Bronte » Thu Oct 18, 2012 2:57 pm

The significance of a question often depends on who asks it.

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VUSisterRayVU
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Re: Grammar Question

Postby VUSisterRayVU » Thu Oct 18, 2012 4:53 pm

Bronte wrote:The significance of a question often depends on who asks it.

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eyescream
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Re: Grammar Question

Postby eyescream » Thu Oct 18, 2012 5:57 pm

Anonymous User wrote:Which sentence is grammatically correct (not awkward), A or B?

A) Oftentimes a question can have added significance depending on who asks it.

B) Oftentimes, depending on who asks it, a question can have added significance.


*Also, if both sentences sound awkward and you feel there is a better way of saying it, by all means please comment!


Both are grammatically correct and fine. It's just a matter of style whether you want the question-asker to lead or the question. In example A, you could write: Oftentimes, a question can have added significance, depending on who asks it.

I would go with A, though, unless you're deliberately trying to slow the pace of the sentence. In which case, go with B.

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Bronte
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Re: Grammar Question

Postby Bronte » Thu Oct 18, 2012 6:11 pm

eyescream wrote:Both are grammatically correct and fine. It's just a matter of style whether you want the question-asker to lead or the question. In example A, you could write: Oftentimes, a question can have added significance, depending on who asks it.

I would go with A, though, unless you're deliberately trying to slow the pace of the sentence. In which case, go with B.


Both constructions are awkward, especially the second. At a minimum, the word "oftentimes" is a disfavored variant of the word "often." See Garner's Modern American Usage.

Anonymous User
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Re: Grammar Question

Postby Anonymous User » Fri Oct 19, 2012 3:59 pm

Thank you. I have one more grammar question:

"Consequently,my role as a son and an older brother has affected how I view myself and my relation to the world around me."

"Consequently. the way I view myself and my relationship to the world is shaped by my experiences as a son and older brother."


Is it just me, or do these sentences seem needlessly complex?

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Bronte
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Re: Grammar Question

Postby Bronte » Fri Oct 19, 2012 4:12 pm

Anonymous User wrote:Thank you. I have one more grammar question:

"Consequently,my role as a son and an older brother has affected how I view myself and my relation to the world around me."

"Consequently. the way I view myself and my relationship to the world is shaped by my experiences as a son and older brother."


Is it just me, or do these sentences seem needlessly complex?


I suggest: "My experiences as a son and older brother have thus affected the way I understand myself and the world." Note that, out of context, this sentence sounds like fluff.

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VUSisterRayVU
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Re: Grammar Question

Postby VUSisterRayVU » Fri Oct 19, 2012 4:25 pm

Bronte wrote:
Anonymous User wrote:Thank you. I have one more grammar question:

"Consequently,my role as a son and an older brother has affected how I view myself and my relation to the world around me."

"Consequently. the way I view myself and my relationship to the world is shaped by my experiences as a son and older brother."


Is it just me, or do these sentences seem needlessly complex?


I suggest: "My experiences as a son and older brother have thus affected the way I understand myself and the world." Note that, out of context, this sentence sounds like fluff.


All of these are verbose and passive.

"My experiences as a son and older brother affected how I understand myself and the world."

Wile E.
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Re: Grammar Question

Postby Wile E. » Fri Oct 19, 2012 4:36 pm

No need to use the word "oftentimes". It is awkward and verbose. Just use "often". Even better, don't use that at all. Also, no need for the "it" at the end. The most clear way to write this is: A question can have added significance depending on who asks.

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Bronte
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Re: Grammar Question

Postby Bronte » Fri Oct 19, 2012 4:47 pm

VUSisterRayVU wrote:
Bronte wrote:
I suggest: "My experiences as a son and older brother have thus affected the way I understand myself and the world." Note that, out of context, this sentence sounds like fluff.


All of these are verbose and passive.

"My experiences as a son and older brother affected how I understand myself and the world."


Yeah, I think you've improved on my suggestion. I would differ with you on a couple points though. For one, if my suggestion is verbose, it can't be very verbose because you only shortened it by three words. One of the words you removed--"thus"--changes the meaning of the sentence somewhat. Second, my suggested sentence is not in the passive voice. Each of our sentences is in the past tense (mine past perfect, yours past simple). Neither is in the passive voice.




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