First Draft of PS - Please be very harsh

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Anonymous User
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First Draft of PS - Please be very harsh

Postby Anonymous User » Sun Oct 14, 2012 8:26 pm

Whenever I spend time in Bulgaria, my second home, I am asked what I want to do after school. I always answer in the same way – I would like to build up knowledge and experience abroad and later return and see if I can apply my skills at home. When I was younger, people would smile and commend me for my optimism. Now that I have matured yet repeat the same wish, some have expressed their surprise and even indignation. Why would I do such a thing when all of the best and brightest are leaving? And what would I, as an American, be able to contribute to a country that I left when I was a mere toddler? These questions began to trouble me just at the time when my career plans started to come into focus. I was baffled by the blatant contradiction: on the one hand, Bulgarian society was bemoaning the crippling brain drain that was affecting all professions, yet on the other, the community, including my own friends and colleagues, were ridiculing those wanting to do something about it. It seemed like half a century of dictatorship had imbued a national sense of fatalism that was paralyzing progress and snuffing out hope wherever it appeared. What is more, it had bred hostility towards the outside, towards those who ‘could never understand.’ Whereas the community was always proud of the accomplishments of the diaspora – they were Bulgarian achievements away from home – the fear of uncomfortable change meant resistance towards their return. Normally seen as a Bulgarian living abroad, I rapidly became an American with Bulgarian roots when bringing up the possibility of return. As I have grown, I have come to attach little importance to nationality, so this play on identities was less hurtful than the haunting fear that I might not be accepted at home despite my best intentions and efforts.

Fortunately, this has only reinforced my commitment to return in the long term. Significant amounts of time spent in the country in the past three years, including a stint interning at a governmental organization, have shown me that attitudes are changing. Even more significantly for me, reflecting on the challenge of return has led me to more cultural sensitivity and respect for history. I have delved deeper into the history of my home, for example by attending a week-long academic conference dedicated to the victims of communist dictatorship held at a harrowing former prison. What is more, I am now much more aware of the difficult road ahead and the challenge, while at times daunting, is as exciting as ever.

My commitment to return is rooted both in an ambition to overcome challenges and in respect for my origins. I owe my position to my nurturing ‘Bulgarian’ upbringing in an open and accepting environment in the United States. Though I have spent fifteen years in the US, I cannot forget the defining role my home away from home has played. I have grown up alongside both my parents and grandparents speaking Bulgarian, listening to the stories of their childhood, and maintaining a strong bond with the culture despite the distance. Although I have thoroughly enjoyed my time both in the US and in Britain, I yearn to return to Bulgaria because it is an opportunity waiting to be taken. The country needs my generation to return, and I am preparing to answer that call.

I have spent the last few years preparing for this move, both directly and indirectly. I have done my undergraduate studies in Europe and have traveled during my time off in order to get a better sense of people’s experiences of growth and change around the world. I have also made a point of returning to Bulgaria regularly in order to build links for the future, for example by working at the central bank over the summer. In my studies, I have focused on politics and economics in preparation for my goal of working in public policy. Aiming to broaden my intellectual horizons and build legal expertise, I hope to return to the US to attend law school. I believe a strong legal foundation in a stimulating environment will prove invaluable for my work at home, especially given the central role the rule of law plays in transitioning states. Furthermore, the diversity of experiences afforded by an American graduate education coupled with my British undergraduate degree will add important perspective to my studies. While I know the task in front of me will not be easy and will require serious commitment and perseverance, this is how I hope to prepare for the path home.

jmart154
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Re: First Draft of PS - Please be very harsh

Postby jmart154 » Sun Oct 14, 2012 9:06 pm

This is a very well-written PS but I think the direction you are taking is not the appropriate one. It sounds like you want to obtain your law degree and then return back to Bulgaria - this is not something Law Schools look favourably upon. They want to accept students who are going to stay in the country (preferably even the same city) and make a difference there. The question they might ask after reading your statement is "Why here? Why isn't a law degree in Bulgaria sufficient?"

CanadianWolf
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Re: First Draft of PS - Please be very harsh

Postby CanadianWolf » Sun Oct 14, 2012 9:13 pm

Although I understand jmart's viewpoint in the post above, I disagree. Law schools are not focused on developing local talent; law schools seek to develop those who can make an impact whether locally or abroad.

Anonymous User
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Re: First Draft of PS - Please be very harsh

Postby Anonymous User » Sun Oct 14, 2012 9:16 pm

jmart154 wrote:This is a very well-written PS but I think the direction you are taking is not the appropriate one. It sounds like you want to obtain your law degree and then return back to Bulgaria - this is not something Law Schools look favourably upon. They want to accept students who are going to stay in the country (preferably even the same city) and make a difference there. The question they might ask after reading your statement is "Why here? Why isn't a law degree in Bulgaria sufficient?"


Thank you for this. The reason for this is that our universities are nowhere near as challenging and prestigious, hence the massive outflow of students to begin with. Maybe it's too big of a gamble, but my reasoning was that it would contribute to their diversity and potentially reflect well on the school if I succeeded in my career? It would increase their exposure to a whole new part of the world and it might strengthen their claim to successful global graduates. Or maybe this is just ridiculous thinking...

jmart154
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Joined: Wed Sep 14, 2011 6:30 pm

Re: First Draft of PS - Please be very harsh

Postby jmart154 » Mon Oct 15, 2012 12:43 am

Ok, now that I see it through your and CanadianWolf's perspective, I see it a bit differently. If that's your approach, stick with it :) As I said before, your sentences are well-formulated and clear. If I have a moment or two in the next day, I'll look over it again and see if there is anything I can pick out in particular.

Anonymous User
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Re: First Draft of PS - Please be very harsh

Postby Anonymous User » Mon Oct 15, 2012 9:27 pm

Bump. Anyone else? Too risky?

ssyouss
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Re: First Draft of PS - Please be very harsh

Postby ssyouss » Mon Oct 15, 2012 10:49 pm

First of well this is probably one of the most well written statements ive ever seen. You write way too well.

I just think it might be too risky.

Anonymous User
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Re: First Draft of PS - Please be very harsh

Postby Anonymous User » Fri Oct 19, 2012 7:40 pm

Anyone please? I'm getting quite anxious and haven't received much yet.




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