Attempt two. Little Help?

(Personal Statement Examples, Advice, Critique, . . . )
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bport hopeful
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Joined: Wed Dec 08, 2010 4:09 pm

Attempt two. Little Help?

Postby bport hopeful » Mon Jan 03, 2011 2:30 pm

“How is school going? What are you studying?” I had come to expect questions like these when returning home from college, and honestly, I hated it. I did not avoid this question because I was doing poorly or because I was unhappy with what I was studying. The real problem was that most people were not quite sure what to make of a B.S. degree in political science, and for the first year of my undergraduate studies, I tended to share these views.

For a long time, I questioned the usefulness of my course work. Law had become an interest of mine after a high school business law class, so I knew that I wanted to attend law school coming out of high school. So even though I found politics interesting, I did not think that knowing why the Soviets disbanded the Comintern brought me any closer to my goal of law school. I suppose I just saw undergraduate work as a necessary hoop to jump through on my way to law school. For me, this was a disheartening thought that caused me to gain a slight disinterest for my schooling.

Salvation came to me in a sidetracked professor’s lecture. While discussing the forces that influenced American political movements, a somewhat off topic question arose. Someone had commented on how their degree lacked utility. I was intrigued by the comment because I held the same concerns. My professor stopped class to address this student’s apprehension. He explained to us that a liberal arts degree is not vocational in the sense that we will learn information that will be applied to a career, but that we are becoming thinkers. He believed that one should spend their undergraduate career exercising their brain while building logical and reasoning skills. This explanation of my education truly resonated with me. I realized that I was not just jumping through hoops on my way to law school; I was training myself, so when I got to law school I would be ready for it.

This realization not only brought validity to my education, but also altered how I approached it. I decided that if I was going to exercise my thinking skills, then I would try to introduce myself to as many different kinds of thought as possible. As a result, I added a second major in philosophy and two minors; one in history and one in international studies. I greatly believe that this additional course work was extremely beneficial. I believe that my intellectual, logical, and discursive abilities have grown significantly over the last three and a half years.

I began to study philosophy and found that law was not just an interest of mine, but what I consider to be a noble institution symbolized by dignified work. Over the last several years, my studies in philosophy have caused me to think about what is important to me and what makes life significant. For me, the most important aspect of live is free will. Free will gives meaning to life as each person is in control of their own decisions. People’s control over their actions is a great power, and societal order only comes when the majority of people use this power responsibly. I see law as something to encourage people to use this power responsibly. For me, there is no greater work than working to uphold the law and I wouldn’t want to spend my life doing anything else. Because of my undergraduate studies, my interest in law has become a passion.

My undergraduate studies were extremely important to me. I believe that they allowed me to flourish intellectually and grow as a person. They also equipped me with the tools to excel in the future, as well as the zeal to stay driven while I achieve my goals.

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MrSparkle
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Joined: Mon Jan 03, 2011 3:06 pm

Re: Attempt two. Little Help?

Postby MrSparkle » Mon Jan 03, 2011 9:47 pm

New topic please. Your subject is probably what 99% of lib arts majors eventually figure out, and frankly does not reveal you to be unique.

mala2
Posts: 225
Joined: Wed Oct 20, 2010 4:39 am

Re: Attempt two. Little Help?

Postby mala2 » Mon Jan 03, 2011 10:03 pm

I agree new topic please

cubswin
Posts: 618
Joined: Mon May 25, 2009 4:40 pm

Re: Attempt two. Little Help?

Postby cubswin » Mon Jan 03, 2011 10:29 pm

Going to share my immediate reactions with you while I read. This means if a comment appears after the first paragraph, I haven't yet read anything after it, etc.

bport hopeful wrote:“How is school going? What are you studying?” I had come to expect questions like these when returning home from college, and honestly, I hated it. I did not avoid this question because I was doing poorly or because I was unhappy with what I was studying. The real problem was that most people were not quite sure what to make of a B.S. degree in political science, and for the first year of my undergraduate studies, I tended to share these views. So, you're applying to law school because you have a liberal arts degree and don't know what to do with it?

For a long time, I questioned the usefulness of my course work. The value of a liberal arts degree doesn't lie in its "usefulness." Law had become an interest of mine after a high school business law class, so I knew that I wanted to attend law school coming out of high school. I took a business law class and it was a joke. This is a frivolous reason for wanting to attend law school. So even though I found politics interesting, I did not think that knowing why the Soviets disbanded the Comintern brought me any closer to my goal of law school. Because it's not supposed to. I suppose I just saw undergraduate work as a necessary hoop to jump through on my way to law school. For me, this was a disheartening thought that caused me to gain a slight disinterest for my schooling. I don't know your stats, but I assume that you are indirectly explaining bad grades. I also assume that this is an excuse, and that the real reason is because you drank too much, slept around, and skipped class.

Salvation came to me in a sidetracked professor’s lecture. While discussing the forces that influenced American political movements Possibly the vaguest lecture topic ever., a somewhat off topic question arose. Someone had commented on how their degree lacked utility. Again, nobody majors in History because it has utility. More importantly, use a masculine or feminine pronoun here. "Their" is a possessive pronoun, and using it as a gender-neutral pronoun is considered poor style (and ESPECIALLY poor since you are talking about an actual person and not just speaking in the abstract.) I was intrigued by the comment because I held the same concerns. My professor stopped class to address this student’s apprehension. He explained to us that a liberal arts degree is not vocational in the sense that we will learn information that will be applied to a career, but that we are becoming thinkers. He believed that one should spend their undergraduate career exercising their brain while building logical and reasoning skills. This explanation of my education truly resonated with me. I realized that I was not just jumping through hoops on my way to law school; I was training myself, so when I got to law school I would be ready for it.

This realization not only brought validity to my education, but also altered how I approached it. I decided that if I was going to exercise my thinking skills, then I would try to introduce myself to as many different kinds of thought as possible. As a result, I added a second major in philosophy and two minors; one in history and one in international studies. I greatly believe that this additional course work was extremely beneficial. I believe that my intellectual, logical, and discursive abilities have grown significantly over the last three and a half years. You are saying instead of showing, though this last line is admittedly difficult to show.

I began to study philosophy and found that law was not just an interest of mine, but what I consider to be a noble institution symbolized by dignified work. Over the last several years, my studies in philosophy have caused me to think about what is important to me and what makes life significant. FYI: Wittgenstein hates you. For me, the most important aspect of LIFE is free will. Free will gives meaning to life as each person is in control of their own decisions. This seems like an extremely superficial treatment of free will. People’s control over their actions is a great power, and societal order only comes when the majority of people use this power responsibly. I see law as something to encourage people to use this power responsibly. For me, there is no greater work than working to uphold the law and I wouldn’t want to spend my life doing anything else. Because of my undergraduate studies, my interest in law has become a passion.

My undergraduate studies were extremely important to me. Arg. I believe that they allowed me to flourish intellectually and grow as a person. What if I don't believe that? They also equipped me with the tools to excel in the future, as well as the zeal to stay driven while I achieve my goals.


MrSparkle hits the nail on the head. Ad-comms assume you got that type of shit out of your liberal arts degree. Most people applying have similar degrees. You want to stand out in some other way. This probably won't sink your application at schools where you are a lock, but it's not going to do you any favors.

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bport hopeful
Posts: 4913
Joined: Wed Dec 08, 2010 4:09 pm

Re: Attempt two. Little Help?

Postby bport hopeful » Mon Jan 03, 2011 11:14 pm

I am not unique. I am screwed. I cannot think of what to write about.

Not talking about bad grades/not an excuse.

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stintez
Posts: 307
Joined: Fri Apr 02, 2010 12:55 pm

Re: Attempt two. Little Help?

Postby stintez » Mon Jan 03, 2011 11:33 pm

MrSparkle wrote:New topic please. Your subject is probably what 99% of lib arts majors eventually figure out, and frankly does not reveal you to be unique.

+1

LSATclincher
Posts: 476
Joined: Mon Nov 30, 2009 12:09 pm

Re: Attempt two. Little Help?

Postby LSATclincher » Mon Jan 03, 2011 11:37 pm

I said this before in another thread, and people disagreed. But I'll say it again. Take 2 weeks to come up with a good life story that has shaped you into a confident man/woman today. Once you think of that story, take a good month to tweak many times over. If you cannot think of a story in that 2 week time frame, take a year off, gain some experience, and come back into the fold as a more confident man/woman. Law school is a grueling journey. There is no rush to enter.

Good luck!




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