Approaching the final draft: law and literature.

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downing
Posts: 272
Joined: Tue Jul 20, 2010 2:03 am

Approaching the final draft: law and literature.

Postby downing » Mon Nov 15, 2010 10:28 am

I'll use TLS's format to introduce my PS
Structure: personal narrative
Topic(s): intellectual interests and work experience
Thesis: literature informed my decision on law, and experience confirmed it

For some individuals it’s a moment of brilliant insight that drives them toward a unique personal goal; for me, it was the combination of a love of Jules Verne’s novels and the spirited lectures on British Literature by Dr. Lawrence which made the taxing business of deciding on a major simple. I chose to study English Literature – and through literature I found my way to law.

Old rabbis energetically arguing over the minutiae of Jewish rules and regulations; bearded scholars in suits poring over convoluted property laws in the original Aramaic; and myself, a curious and intrepid Jewish-Japanese-American, in a crowd of Ashkenazi Jews: those vivid memories resurfaced in my mind in response to lectures on the complex problems of ownership in Victorian era novels, and the presence of legal issues in Langland’s Piers Plowman – I saw that English literature was rife with references to legal matters; references that stirred my imagination, and which anchored theories to practicum. Moreover, the subject of law provided me with an intellectual link between the classes I took while in Yeshiva, and those that arose during my study of literature in college. I began to view law as a necessary social underpinning of any civilized society. By being regularly exposed to law, directly and indirectly, I grew determined to study law formally in an academic setting: my eyes were firmly set on law school.

After graduating from college I wanted more experience, and to make the transition to law school equipped with a better informed world view, so I began teaching in Korea. I was grateful for the opportunity, as I was able to apply the skills I gained as an English major to instruct and be a mentor to a diverse body of students, and learn the language of a rich culture.

I had the dual opportunity to work for established organizations, and of forming my own school with a Korean associate. In the past two years I taught children as young as four years old to adults in their fifties, managed a plethora of study groups, and founded a small academy in the city of Gwacheon. To start my academy, and when finding work at established academies, I had to advertise bilingually in Korean and English (vocally and in writing), and come to a basic understanding of laws pertaining to the acquisition of property and the drawing up of contracts. During the whole process I was struck by, and reminded of, the import knowledge of the law possessed. Abroad as well as domestically, legal issues have entered my life in an immediately consequential way. In overcoming obstacles in Korea, I kept constantly aware of the rules and regulations attached to my professional endeavors, and came to see jurisprudence as a strongly recurrent theme in my life: one that stemmed from my youth, and extended to the current; a theme that I hope to shape my future with.

One animated professor, and a voracious appetite for reading, combined to lead me to the study of literature. The careful study of literature, combined with observations derived from my past, led me to a scholarly interest in law. Finally, my myriad experiences living for years in a foreign country gave me the edge and confidence – the personality – I will need to excel in law school. Above all, what I learned was to be adaptable in new circumstances and settings; to embrace whatever society I find myself in, all while keeping a watchful eye open for pitfalls and opportunities. Indeed, on a few levels my consciousness was awakened through the blend of academic interests and my focus on praxis. It is now time that I welcome the prospect of contributing to a dynamic campus and legal community.

WayBryson
Posts: 179
Joined: Fri Sep 10, 2010 8:24 pm

Re: Approaching the final draft: law and literature.

Postby WayBryson » Tue Nov 16, 2010 12:37 am

Quick glance impression.

There is a little too much telling in this and not enough showing, though I don't think this is true to the point of fault. I also noticed that your comma usage in the first sentence of your conclusion is wrong.

"One animated professor, and a voracious appetite for reading, combined to lead me to the study of literature."

The two commas make "and a voracious appetite for reading" a parenthetical clause, when it is meant to be half of the subject of your sentence. Consider that "One animated professor combined to lead me to the study of law" does not make sense.

This instead:

"One animated professor combined with my voracious appetite for reading led me to the study of literature."

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downing
Posts: 272
Joined: Tue Jul 20, 2010 2:03 am

Re: Approaching the final draft: law and literature.

Postby downing » Tue Nov 16, 2010 2:11 am

WayBryson wrote:Quick glance impression.

There is a little too much telling in this and not enough showing, though I don't think this is true to the point of fault. I also noticed that your comma usage in the first sentence of your conclusion is wrong.

"One animated professor, and a voracious appetite for reading, combined to lead me to the study of literature."

The two commas make "and a voracious appetite for reading" a parenthetical clause, when it is meant to be half of the subject of your sentence. Consider that "One animated professor combined to lead me to the study of law" does not make sense.

This instead:

"One animated professor combined with my voracious appetite for reading led me to the study of literature."


Thank you. I'm going to fix that grammatical issue, and try to work on making the showing bit stronger.




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