55%-60% scholarship at Loyola or Chicago-Kent; worth it?

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rzzza
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55%-60% scholarship at Loyola or Chicago-Kent; worth it?

Postby rzzza » Tue Mar 21, 2017 8:32 am

I took the LSAT twice and these two schools are the best I'm gonna do. I feel fortunate to be accepted to either one with scholarships that cover roughly half the cost of tuition. I'm aware of the competitive job market in Illinois and the fact that new hires are most likely to come out of superior schools in University of Chicago and Northwestern. Nevertheless, I want to ask you all for advice about not only which school is better to attend but also whether this scholarship amount will let me breathe easier upon graduation even if I don't end up pursuing a career in law right away or perhaps at all. I've seen some people claim that one shouldn't attend either of these schools unless nothing less but a full ride was offered. But I suspect the people who say these things have more appealing options open to them based on their LSAT/uGPA and are looking down their noses at this sort of dilemma from somewhat of an ivory tower. I intend to negotiate my scholarship and may be able to get it up by a few thousand dollars more, I'm an alumnus of Loyola and my median LSAT is a few points higher than either of these schools median LSAT according to this site's rankings. So maybe they'll give me more money, but obviously nothing near a 'full ride'.

So what do you guys think?

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UVA2B
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Re: 55%-60% scholarship at Loyola or Chicago-Kent; worth it?

Postby UVA2B » Tue Mar 21, 2017 8:43 am

What do you want to do with a law degree?

rzzza
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Re: 55%-60% scholarship at Loyola or Chicago-Kent; worth it?

Postby rzzza » Tue Mar 21, 2017 9:18 am

UVA2B wrote:What do you want to do with a law degree?


I don't have any good answer for that. I've always been one of those people who never knew what they wanted to do in life. I want to regard it as a generalist degree for now and if one specific field of law sparks my interest while I'm going through law school then I will specialize. I'm interested in a wide variety; public law, international law, sports law & criminal law. My career background is actually in sales and I feel like I can always fall back on sales again if the law school thing doesn't work out. By now, with my experience, I believe I can get an inside sales job that pays at least $50,000/yr + commission. So if I find myself in debt with no legal jobs willing to hire me my plan is to fall back on sales to pay off my debt and kinda go from there. Play it by ear. I'm told that it doesn't hurt to have a J.D. to your name as you go through life and if I have to spend a few years after law school working a non-legal related job to pay off my school debt it seems like it'd be worth it. Although the word on the grapevine the past several years is that the industry is over saturated with too many law students and not enough jobs for them all, I figure that a J.D. is much like any graduate degree and its value in society will fluctuate. Right now may be some lean times but I'm gambling that things will pick up in the future and a J.D. will become more valued again.

What appeals to me about Chicago-Kent is the strength of their legal writing program. What I like about Loyola is the fact that I'm an alumnus from their parent institution and that their name seems to carry more weight in Chicago & across Illinois. Despite being similarly ranked, it feels like Loyola is more well known & recognized by people. I don't know how large of a factor that really plays in post-graduate success tbh.

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Re: 55%-60% scholarship at Loyola or Chicago-Kent; worth it?

Postby RedPurpleBlue » Tue Mar 21, 2017 10:49 am

rzzza wrote: I don't have any good answer for that.


You really shouldn't be attending law school if you don't know what you want to do with your degree. Law school is not the time to figure yourself out like undergraduate school. It's shorter and specialized. You likely wouldn't go to a school that only offers engineering degrees if you wanted to figure yourself out, so you shouldn't do it with law school either.

rzzza wrote: I've always been one of those people who never knew what they wanted to do in life.


These are the exact type of people who generally end up regretting law school. Law school is not an endeavor to embark on in a willy nilly manner. You should be going for reasons beyond "I don't know what to do with myself, so why not go to law school." You should be going because it helps you get a specific career you want that can only be attained through a law degree or has a high likelihood of requiring a law degree.

rzzza wrote: I want to regard it as a generalist degree for now and if one specific field of law sparks my interest while I'm going through law school then I will specialize. I'm interested in a wide variety; public law, international law, sports law & criminal law. My career background is actually in sales and I feel like I can always fall back on sales again if the law school thing doesn't work out. By now, with my experience, I believe I can get an inside sales job that pays at least $50,000/yr + commission.


It is very hard to be a generalist in law these days, unless you're at a very small firm where you need to be a sort of generalist. Those small firms, however, don't normally pay much more than $50,000 - $60,000/yr. starting, and your salary may not increase that much, even if you make partner. Financially, you might be better off taking a sales job at $50,000/yr. + commission and trying to advance through that route. It would save you three years of law school debt and lost earnings from having to study instead of work.

rzzza wrote: So if I find myself in debt with no legal jobs willing to hire me my plan is to fall back on sales to pay off my debt and kinda go from there. Play it by ear. I'm told that it doesn't hurt to have a J.D. to your name as you go through life and if I have to spend a few years after law school working a non-legal related job to pay off my school debt it seems like it'd be worth it.


If you're spending a few years after law school working a non-legal job, you're not really likely to necessarily ever get a legal job. Law schools are producing plenty of lawyers, and most firms would rather pass up someone who took non-legal work straight out of law school than a fresh grad who looks like they want to hop straight into firm life and stay there. Also, going to law school and being fine with a non-legal job makes little to no sense. It's the same as going to medical school and being fine with a non-medical job. Law school, like medical school, is a professional school. You should only be going if you've come to the point in life where you're only okay working in those specific professions.


rzzza wrote: Although the word on the grapevine the past several years is that the industry is over saturated with too many law students and not enough jobs for them all, I figure that a J.D. is much like any graduate degree and its value in society will fluctuate. Right now may be some lean times but I'm gambling that things will pick up in the future and a J.D. will become more valued again.


Yes, the market is oversaturated, and there has been little to no indication that the market will get any less saturated in the near future. Law schools are still producing far more graduates than there are legal positions, and that has been going on for years. Don't make the gamble that it gets any better, because it's one of the worst gambles you could make.

rzzza wrote: What appeals to me about Chicago-Kent is the strength of their legal writing program. What I like about Loyola is the fact that I'm an alumnus from their parent institution and that their name seems to carry more weight in Chicago & across Illinois. Despite being similarly ranked, it feels like Loyola is more well known & recognized by people. I don't know how large of a factor that really plays in post-graduate success tbh.


Loyola and Chicago-Kent both have very little weight in Chicago as law schools. Nearly 50% of each schools graduates end up unemployed, employed part-time or short-term, or in business positions (i.e. non-legal positions). That means you have a coin flips chance of even getting a real long-term legal job out of those schools in the first 9 months, if you even end up liking the law. Clearly, their brands don't hold that much weight if those are their outcomes. The only two heavy hitters in Chicago that have a great deal of weight behind their brands are UChicago and Northwestern. Beyond that, you'd be better off going to the University of Illinois - Urbana Champaign if you wanted a job in Illinois/Chicago. Only 30% of their grads end up in the aforementioned unemployed, PT/ST, and business positions.

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guynourmin
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Re: 55%-60% scholarship at Loyola or Chicago-Kent; worth it?

Postby guynourmin » Tue Mar 21, 2017 12:44 pm

rzzza wrote:
UVA2B wrote:What do you want to do with a law degree?


I don't have any good answer for that. I've always been one of those people who never knew what they wanted to do in life. I want to regard it as a generalist degree for now and if one specific field of law sparks my interest while I'm going through law school then I will specialize. I'm interested in a wide variety; public law, international law, sports law & criminal law. My career background is actually in sales and I feel like I can always fall back on sales again if the law school thing doesn't work out. By now, with my experience, I believe I can get an inside sales job that pays at least $50,000/yr + commission. So if I find myself in debt with no legal jobs willing to hire me my plan is to fall back on sales to pay off my debt and kinda go from there. Play it by ear. I'm told that it doesn't hurt to have a J.D. to your name as you go through life and if I have to spend a few years after law school working a non-legal related job to pay off my school debt it seems like it'd be worth it. Although the word on the grapevine the past several years is that the industry is over saturated with too many law students and not enough jobs for them all, I figure that a J.D. is much like any graduate degree and its value in society will fluctuate. Right now may be some lean times but I'm gambling that things will pick up in the future and a J.D. will become more valued again.

What appeals to me about Chicago-Kent is the strength of their legal writing program. What I like about Loyola is the fact that I'm an alumnus from their parent institution and that their name seems to carry more weight in Chicago & across Illinois. Despite being similarly ranked, it feels like Loyola is more well known & recognized by people. I don't know how large of a factor that really plays in post-graduate success tbh.


please don't go to law school

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Re: 55%-60% scholarship at Loyola or Chicago-Kent; worth it?

Postby cavalier1138 » Tue Mar 21, 2017 12:47 pm

Just to reiterate: you are exactly the kind of person who should not go to law school. And in case anything that's been said to that effect has sounded like an insult, it isn't. You're talking about entering a very specific profession on a whim. Don't do that.

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Thomas Hagan, ESQ.
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Re: 55%-60% scholarship at Loyola or Chicago-Kent; worth it?

Postby Thomas Hagan, ESQ. » Tue Mar 21, 2017 12:57 pm

Also going to pile on and say that you don't have to go to law school to "figure things out." This is exactly why people take time off during UG, after UG, and before law school. Gap years are much cheaper than law school.

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Re: 55%-60% scholarship at Loyola or Chicago-Kent; worth it?

Postby Halltheway » Tue Mar 21, 2017 4:18 pm

Yup. Definitely don't go. Wait and figure out exactly what you want to do. It is not worth the thousands you will owe and the time and pain you will suffer in law school, just to learn you don't even want to do it after a year. I know people in my section who did the same as you and came to law school and regret it. As annoying as it sounds, you honestly need to figure out if this is the right place for you. It's a huge commitment and shouldn't be taken lightly. At all.

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Re: 55%-60% scholarship at Loyola or Chicago-Kent; worth it?

Postby chicagoburger » Tue Mar 21, 2017 4:46 pm

If you are unsure about going to law school right now, and you know that you may still want to go to law school, say in 2022, you are better off going now.

The cost will only go up, given you can't improve your scores.

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Re: 55%-60% scholarship at Loyola or Chicago-Kent; worth it?

Postby Thomas Hagan, ESQ. » Tue Mar 21, 2017 4:48 pm

chicagoburger wrote:If you are unsure about going to law school right now, and you know that you may still want to go to law school, say in 2022, you are better off going now.

The cost will only go up, given you can't improve your scores.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qnYdteja7Y0

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Re: 55%-60% scholarship at Loyola or Chicago-Kent; worth it?

Postby Anon.y.mousse. » Tue Mar 21, 2017 4:49 pm

chicagoburger wrote:If you are unsure about going to law school right now, and you know that you may still want to go to law school, say in 2022, you are better off going now.

The cost will only go up, given you can't improve your scores.


STOP GIVING BAD ADVICE

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UVA2B
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Re: 55%-60% scholarship at Loyola or Chicago-Kent; worth it?

Postby UVA2B » Tue Mar 21, 2017 4:52 pm

chicagoburger wrote:If you are unsure about going to law school right now, and you know that you may still want to go to law school, say in 2022, you are better off going now.

The cost will only go up, given you can't improve your scores.


Just stop. Your illogical trolling and horrible advice is toxic for people actually trying to make smart decisions. The only benefit is if the person is wise enough to think your advice is BS, in which case the quality advice will look even more persuasive by comparison.

OP, you need to have a more concrete plan for law school than simply believing you'll figure it out once you get there. "Finding yourself" is not worth five or six figures debt and the risk of not getting what you want after the fact (or realizing you don't want any of it) would be personally and financially ruinous.

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Pomeranian
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Re: 55%-60% scholarship at Loyola or Chicago-Kent; worth it?

Postby Pomeranian » Tue Mar 21, 2017 5:02 pm

I would avoid these two (as well as DePaul). Not worth it unless for free, and even then I would probably not take that 50% chance of ending up unemployed.

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Re: 55%-60% scholarship at Loyola or Chicago-Kent; worth it?

Postby BigZuck » Tue Mar 21, 2017 6:19 pm

Btw I've only had a JD for like 9 months but if there's some intrinsic value to it beyond allowing you to sit for the bar/become a lawyer I sure as hell haven't see it. And if that intrinsic value exists I can almost assure you that it isn't worth 100K+

rzzza
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Re: 55%-60% scholarship at Loyola or Chicago-Kent; worth it?

Postby rzzza » Tue Mar 21, 2017 7:10 pm

I thought first year curriculum was pretty similar across all schools and 1st year students will often use the first year to figure out what they want to specialize in for years 2 and 3? You guys are telling me that pre-law students will usually know what type of law they want to practice before even enrolling in a school? I'd think it's far more common to have a general idea but as far as knowing 100% that you'll end up as some niche type of lawyer, how could it be easy to have that much foresight and clarity of vision in life when life tends to toss you curves?

An attorney won't even take a pre-law student as an unpaid intern. I tried to apply for legal internships and the guy basically ushered me out of his office when he found out I hadn't even taken the LSAT yet. From what I understand, it's common for students to seek internships once they're already enrolled in law school and typically after their first year. So I don't know how it's reasonable to expect pre-law students to know with a certainty what kind of law they want to practice when they've been exposed to so little of it.

I appreciate your warnings but I'm determined to enroll in law school. I've never known what I wanted to DO for a career so if I sit around trying to figure it out I know I'll end up sitting around forever and ultimately doing nothing. I never set out to get into sales either but one part time job led to another and I built up enough experience to eventually have a resume decent enough to be offered $45-50,000+/yr type jobs. I never said I WANT TO BE A SALESMAN. It just happened. I think stories like that are FAR more common than the stories about people who always knew what they wanted to do, worked towards it all their life and did it. I could settle into a career in sales and just say this is what I'm gonna do, but I don't want to do it my whole life. I want a graduate degree to my name because regardless of what critics might say higher education does still open doors for you! Employers look at you differently when they see that graduate degree certification on your resume. Heck, my undergraduate degree in history of all things opened doors for me in the sales field despite history having nothing to do with sales! imo that's how life usually goes, it's unpredictable and you can seldom tell what circumstance or happenstance will lead you down which road.

I'm not the smartest person but I'm a hard worker & I'm dedicated. I'll get that degree. I'll leave law school with a J.D. and about $80,000-$90,000 in debt. It's a lot but could be a lot worse. Most people who earn a graduate degree will have sizeable debt, it doesn't necessarily mean getting the degree wasn't worth it. I live like a Spartan and I can always go back to sales to help pay off that debt. It's not like people aren't hiring for sales jobs.

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Re: 55%-60% scholarship at Loyola or Chicago-Kent; worth it?

Postby TakeItToTrial » Tue Mar 21, 2017 7:38 pm

rzzza wrote:I thought first year curriculum was pretty similar across all schools and 1st year students will often use the first year to figure out what they want to specialize in for years 2 and 3? You guys are telling me that pre-law students will usually know what type of law they want to practice before even enrolling in a school? I'd think it's far more common to have a general idea but as far as knowing 100% that you'll end up as some niche type of lawyer, how could it be easy to have that much foresight and clarity of vision in life when life tends to toss you curves?

An attorney won't even take a pre-law student as an unpaid intern. I tried to apply for legal internships and the guy basically ushered me out of his office when he found out I hadn't even taken the LSAT yet. From what I understand, it's common for students to seek internships once they're already enrolled in law school and typically after their first year. So I don't know how it's reasonable to expect pre-law students to know with a certainty what kind of law they want to practice when they've been exposed to so little of it.

I appreciate your warnings but I'm determined to enroll in law school. I've never known what I wanted to DO for a career so if I sit around trying to figure it out I know I'll end up sitting around forever and ultimately doing nothing. I never set out to get into sales either but one part time job led to another and I built up enough experience to eventually have a resume decent enough to be offered $45-50,000+/yr type jobs. I never said I WANT TO BE A SALESMAN. It just happened. I think stories like that are FAR more common than the stories about people who always knew what they wanted to do, worked towards it all their life and did it. I could settle into a career in sales and just say this is what I'm gonna do, but I don't want to do it my whole life. I want a graduate degree to my name because regardless of what critics might say higher education does still open doors for you! Employers look at you differently when they see that graduate degree certification on your resume. Heck, my undergraduate degree in history of all things opened doors for me in the sales field despite history having nothing to do with sales! imo that's how life usually goes, it's unpredictable and you can seldom tell what circumstance or happenstance will lead you down which road.

I'm not the smartest person but I'm a hard worker & I'm dedicated. I'll get that degree. I'll leave law school with a J.D. and about $80,000-$90,000 in debt. It's a lot but could be a lot worse. Most people who earn a graduate degree will have sizeable debt, it doesn't necessarily mean getting the degree wasn't worth it. I live like a Spartan and I can always go back to sales to help pay off that debt. It's not like people aren't hiring for sales jobs.


Sounds like you have it all figured out. Why did you even ask for advice?

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Re: 55%-60% scholarship at Loyola or Chicago-Kent; worth it?

Postby zot1 » Tue Mar 21, 2017 7:43 pm

chicagoburger wrote:If you are unsure about going to law school right now, and you know that you may still want to go to law school, say in 2022, you are better off going now.

The cost will only go up, given you can't improve your scores.


Dude. Just because you're sinking it doesn't mean you should bring everyone else with you.

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Re: 55%-60% scholarship at Loyola or Chicago-Kent; worth it?

Postby zot1 » Tue Mar 21, 2017 7:48 pm

rzzza wrote:I'm not the smartest person but I'm a hard worker & I'm dedicated. I'll get that degree. I'll leave law school with a J.D. and about $80,000-$90,000 in debt. It's a lot but could be a lot worse. Most people who earn a graduate degree will have sizeable debt, it doesn't necessarily mean getting the degree wasn't worth it. I live like a Spartan and I can always go back to sales to help pay off that debt. It's not like people aren't hiring for sales jobs.


You might get the degree, but you still gotta pass the bar.

You're really willing to get into debt and then go back to an old job you already had pre-debt if you can't find work in the job you got into debt for?? Sounds legit.

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Re: 55%-60% scholarship at Loyola or Chicago-Kent; worth it?

Postby Johann » Tue Mar 21, 2017 7:52 pm

I'm a lot like you and went to law school not knowing what to do. It's true you don't have to know what law to specialize in but you should also consider that sports law and international law aren't law jobs as in they don't exist.

I actually wish I had continued a career in sales that I sort of started going down and was doing part time in college. Sales is way hotter than the legal market from now. Better work life balance, more flexible remote work, no student debt, better hourly wage rates, etc.

I think you should read this board about what lawyers actually do say to day. If it's still something you want to do, either school at that discount is fine. But the career is a grind whether you do law , JD advantage or non law required job. My advice would be to do something with computers, MBA after more sales work, or continue in sales. People that have technical backgrounds can absolutely clean up in sales.

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Re: 55%-60% scholarship at Loyola or Chicago-Kent; worth it?

Postby UVA2B » Tue Mar 21, 2017 7:57 pm

You don't need to have a specific plan of what niche area of law you want to practice in, but you should have some generalized ideas of your goals for the degree. At a minimum, you should know if you're more interested in the following: private firm work, and within that whether it's a big firm with a lot of attorneys and huge resources or if you'd rather be working at a smaller law firm that generally does less complex work for generally much lower pay; government work, and within that whether you want federal government work like the DOJ or SEC, or if you'd rather work on the state or local level as a public defender or district attorney doing criminal work; non-profit public interest, such as working for groups that do immigration work, civil rights litigation, etc. If you can't at least narrow your options down to these types of generalities, you absolutely shouldn't be going to law school. Having more concrete goals is always helpful because it helps shape your venture into the profession, but these are the bare minimum requirements of knowing your goals.

For the types of employment that will service the debt you're considering taking on comfortably, you will likely need either that big law firm type of work, or a full-time job that qualifies for Public Service Loan Forgiveness (note that the second option is decidedly more risky because the program could disappear, or you may not be able to stay in a job that qualifies for all 120 monthly payments of it).

As others have emphatically stated, law school is not a place you should go without knowing what type of job you want out of it, how much it will cost and how you expect to pay for it, and at least a general idea of what is driving you toward a career in the law. It is not a low-stress type of profession, and that stress is further compounded by it being so competitive to get employed in jobs that will service the massive debt incurred to break into it.

It's not that you should never go to law school. Just make sure you've thought everything through.

Also, your 1L is much less about figuring out what type of attorney you want to be and much more about transforming the way you think as a law student. 1L year will do little to nothing to help shape what area of law interests you and what type of job you most desire, because it doesn't give you much insight into the rest of the legal profession outside of academia.

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Re: 55%-60% scholarship at Loyola or Chicago-Kent; worth it?

Postby pyramidenergy888 » Tue Mar 21, 2017 8:21 pm

Go if you want to if you can go without debt... debt is like a chain hanging around your neck. Only undertake it with careful consideration.

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Re: 55%-60% scholarship at Loyola or Chicago-Kent; worth it?

Postby cavalier1138 » Tue Mar 21, 2017 8:42 pm

I cannot reiterate this enough: law school should not be your backup plan for when you're trying to find your way in life. I don't care how much go-get-'em-tiger attitude you can muster. It's a bad idea, and if these schools at these prices are your best options, then you've already shown that you're not the type to excel.

I'd say "sorry" for that sounding harsh, but I'd much rather you feel bristly, defensive, and resentful instead of unemployed.

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Re: 55%-60% scholarship at Loyola or Chicago-Kent; worth it?

Postby chicagoburger » Tue Mar 21, 2017 10:20 pm

UVA2B wrote:You don't need to have a specific plan of what niche area of law you want to practice in, but you should have some generalized ideas of your goals for the degree. At a minimum, you should know if you're more interested in the following: private firm work, and within that whether it's a big firm with a lot of attorneys and huge resources or if you'd rather be working at a smaller law firm that generally does less complex work for generally much lower pay; government work, and within that whether you want federal government work like the DOJ or SEC, or if you'd rather work on the state or local level as a public defender or district attorney doing criminal work; non-profit public interest, such as working for groups that do immigration work, civil rights litigation, etc. If you can't at least narrow your options down to these types of generalities, you absolutely shouldn't be going to law school. Having more concrete goals is always helpful because it helps shape your venture into the profession, but these are the bare minimum requirements of knowing


Your "minimum need to know job types" have nothing to do with one's law school determination. Just like medical school, you don't really need to decide which area you want to focus, let alone if it's for profit or for government purpose.

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Re: 55%-60% scholarship at Loyola or Chicago-Kent; worth it?

Postby chicagoburger » Tue Mar 21, 2017 10:29 pm

cavalier1138 wrote:I cannot reiterate this enough: law school should not be your backup plan for when you're trying to find your way in life. I don't care how much go-get-'em-tiger attitude you can muster. It's a bad idea, and if these schools at these prices are your best options, then you've already shown that you're not the type to excel.

I'd say "sorry" for that sounding harsh, but I'd much rather you feel bristly, defensive, and resentful instead of unemployed.


You shouldn't be sorry for being a jerk. OP has every reason to excel given his choice matches his goals. OP is not going to be a Supreme Court judge. His choices are better than 70% of the students who go to those schools already. And more than half of the students from Loyola and Kent became lawyers.

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Re: 55%-60% scholarship at Loyola or Chicago-Kent; worth it?

Postby UVA2B » Tue Mar 21, 2017 10:37 pm

chicagoburger wrote:
UVA2B wrote:You don't need to have a specific plan of what niche area of law you want to practice in, but you should have some generalized ideas of your goals for the degree. At a minimum, you should know if you're more interested in the following: private firm work, and within that whether it's a big firm with a lot of attorneys and huge resources or if you'd rather be working at a smaller law firm that generally does less complex work for generally much lower pay; government work, and within that whether you want federal government work like the DOJ or SEC, or if you'd rather work on the state or local level as a public defender or district attorney doing criminal work; non-profit public interest, such as working for groups that do immigration work, civil rights litigation, etc. If you can't at least narrow your options down to these types of generalities, you absolutely shouldn't be going to law school. Having more concrete goals is always helpful because it helps shape your venture into the profession, but these are the bare minimum requirements of knowing


Your "minimum need to know job types" have nothing to do with one's law school determination. Just like medical school, you don't really need to decide which area you want to focus, let alone if it's for profit or for government purpose.


Good job, troll. You're baiting me because I was talking about medical school in another thread. That's high-level trolling for an inane dullard like you. Congrats. I'm still going to address your idiotic posts, simply because the volume of quality advice should drown out your illogical, misconceived efforts at trolling.

Given the level of knowledge you've already shown regularly on the subject of law school admissions, I should probably just defer to your astute judgment...or I could go ahead and keep giving solid advice based on more than pretense of my own confirmation bias like yourself.

I'm glad you fully understand how law school admissions and choosing your career works as a 0L, because EVERY single law student/graduate offering advice (read as: actually knows what they're talking about) vehemently disagrees with you.

The reason you need to have some semblance of an idea is because for the biggest sector of hiring, private firm work, happens after 1L year when you've only taken doctrinal courses with possibly one or two classes in your desired or interested field. These classes will do NOTHING to help you figure out what area of law you want to practice. You're not going to read a Contracts decision from 1910 and magically realize, "Yes! Corporate firm work! It all makes sense now!" That's complete lunacy.

Glad you're having fun being the banal reject of the on-topics. No one here who knows what they're talking about has ever agreed with you.




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